A letter from Blagoveshchensk!

Discussion in 'OT (OFF Topic) Forums' started by grober, Jan 9, 2015.

  1. grober

    grober MB Master

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    Perth, Scotland
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    W204 C200CDI Estate
    Came across this post on the Alfa Romeo forums. Its an automated translation from the Russian but despite that has a certain charm all of its own while describing what its like to drive an Alfa Mito in Siberia!

    Now a little history of the Italian car in the harsh Russian winter.

    Trip to Bureysky District. January 2014.
    I once had to go to and then in Novobureysky Doldykan. It is about 280-290 km from my town. Nothing unusual there.
    Got up at 6:00 am, started the car. The thermometer -30°C exactly. Breakfast, washed, dressed and went. Time 6:40. Transmission frozen, rattles, engine behaves normally. Somewhere at 7:30 enables "D" and flew. Fly, turn, need to slow down, and almost no brakes. Pedal as tight without an amplifier. I press the clutch, barely barely surfing gear, release the pedal and she slowly returned to the original. Five seconds back.
    Little scared, stopped at the roadside and began to stomp the pedal and the gear lever to pull. Transmission and frozen brake clutch. I think, come to N.Bureysk friends help.
    Food. mission like medieval carts, hand coolant drops to 80C. Turn the heater fan speed by 1. Temperature began to rise. I looked at the dashboard, and there behind shows -36°C. I have to N.Bureyska half way (110km), and there just below the frost -40°C. I was not mistaken. Came to Bureya. Friend was not at home, no one to help, well, I'm not angry sobo. Food to the nearest shop, climb in the trash, take out a cardboard box and a pair of nylon ropes. Street -41C, numb hands without gloves, scarf snot instead can be used, even to this breeze.
    Well cut cardboard, tied the strings and went to Doldykan (15 km north).
    Prizzhayu in Doldykan, engine temperature did not rise above 80°C, fan on the stove on 1. Gearbox switches with great difficulty, clutch barely works. Cardboard torn off by the wind. Overboard -46°C.
    Colleges watered me tea, warmed. I sit and think what to do, it is necessary to return home. See nowhere and saw a plastic bag lying in the corner. It dawned on me. In the trunk was a roll of tape. Take the package to run the car, open the trunk and exactly roll of lies. Well to celebrate, and let me tape to seal the intake and for-cooler. Scotch breaks in the cold again, I untwist, smooth, glue and glue. A pack just put the holes in the grille, giving the air flow, the two nostrils that would leave the machine choked.
    All the way back I was warm and calm, because the heater warmed by hot air and transmission, though not entirely clear but does not work better. Clutch became better work. Here and on arrival home Russian hero long thought, why he did not do in the fall.

    "Vashe zrodovye"!! :thumb:
     
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  2. ItalianTuneUp

    ItalianTuneUp MB Enthusiast

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    Hampshire
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    Interesting account of life in the severe cold.

    I'm glad I live in the south of England and not there!
     
  3. GLK

    GLK MB Enthusiast

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    Fascinating ... and here I am worry about my battery when it drops down to -2ºC at night :rolleyes:

    BTW, in the middle of the story there, when it says "Food" and "Food to the nearest shop" it supposed to be Driving / Drove - the automated translation confused two Russian words with the same spelling: EDY - as in I'm driving, and EDY - as in I'd like some food; although the main forms for both are different: EZDA - as in Nice driving, and EDA as in Here's some food ... Not confusing at all ... now try to present your PhD thesis in it! :eek:
     
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