Can you replace a reversing bulb with a brighter one?

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As my wife sometimes say, if you cannot say anything nice don't say anything at all.

How sweet.

Maybe THIS forum would answer your question and suit better...
 
^ Thanks I will let my wife have that link.

We have a 10 month old and a 4.5year old it could be a good forum.

At least thats something useful you have added, athough the link didn't work...

:)
 
A reversing lamp bearing an approval mark is not limited to 24w

Although I'm not 100% sure what that actually means?

The Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations 1989

Thanks whitenemesis.

Going through the link... as one does.... it seems there is no max wattage requirement for dipped or main headlights? I always thought that the 100W variety were for off-road use only, and that the maximum allowed for road use was 55W... but that appears not to be the case. Interesting.
 
Interesting info...

thanks
 
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Hi,
I was only thinking tonight when I was reversing that they were not very bright. But I,m gonna do initially is to replace my existing lamps like for like as over time the glass of the lamps discolour (go black). You could try an l.e.d. replacement bulb.
 
I can remember back in the sixties when sticking a spotlamp on the back was considered a cool move. You could certainly see to reverse and also dissuade those who forgot to dip on approaching from behind. All mandraulically operated in those days :D
 
I may be wrong, however, I think reversing lights are only an indication to other road users that you are reversing, and not meant to illuminate your intended route.
 
The answer to the question is 'yes' - you can. Whether you 'should' is a different matter entirely. I very much doubt you would melt any lamp holders given the relatively small wattages involved. CANBUS errors are possible, but I would say unlikely.

I may or may not have fitted 100W main beam lamps to my car. Given that I am not going to be driving into oncoming traffic with them still on means that I am not going to cause a nuisance with them. But I can see better on the occasions that I need them. They did not cause any housing problems, or CANBUS/fuse issues.

Also, I may or may not have ever driven over the speed limit... Etc ...
 
I may be wrong, however, I think reversing lights are only an indication to other road users that you are reversing, and not meant to illuminate your intended route.

Interesting and if correct would give more weight to the need to fit brighter or more reversing bulbs.

In an urban environment with streets lights there maybe little need for this but how about everywhere else?
 
I can remember back in the sixties when sticking a spotlamp on the back was considered a cool move. You could certainly see to reverse and also dissuade those who forgot to dip on approaching from behind. All mandraulically operated in those days :D

Ah - the good old Mini. 100W spotlamp mounted on the boot lid, angled ever so slightly upward. Manually operated of course. Me? Never! ;)
 
Interesting and if correct would give more weight to the need to fit brighter or more reversing bulbs.

In an urban environment with streets lights there maybe little need for this but how about everywhere else?

I think in a total black out the standard light would assist. The view from a rear view mirror only begins several feet from the rear of a vehicle,this would require quite a bright floodlight, especially in a road with street lighting. I think a very bright light could cause an accident, not by dazzling but causing alarm in oncoming vehicles, bright white lights are normally from the headlights of vehicles coming at you. In days of old I have fitted spot lights on the rear of several cars I have owned,however, these were shining directly down under the rear of the bumber, the light then spilled out and illuminated the road without any danger of dazzling anybody.
 
I've never had a problem reversing in dark country lanes just using reversing lamps, as it's dark outside ones eyes adjust so you need less illumination anyway.
 
I've never had a problem reversing in dark country lanes just using reversing lamps, as it's dark outside ones eyes adjust so you need less illumination anyway.

I concur.
 
I remember helping my father out by fitting Morris minor bulb holders into his corroded Austin Cambridge side lights, what a good boy! The following week he duly chastised me as the new lights were 10W when they should have been 5W and burned out his wiring!!
 
On smarts (related to MB), with the double filament tail light bulb, if they are installed incorrectly connecting the filaments to the wrong circuit, all sorts of electrical issues ensue.

Use the decades old trick of using the hazard lights for extra illumination. Simple, effective.
 

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