Cheeky Broadband question

Peter D

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Just noticing how many IT attend this site, here's one you may be able to help me with.

A client needs 4 positions within their house to connect to broadband. Assuming BT place there equipment at the front door, what cabling would we need to run between each point and type of connection, standard, RJ45? We assumed cabling to be standard phone, 2 pair or above?

I may have 30 years in electrical construction, but have no idea on this one; you learn something "hopefully " new every day.
 

RichardM

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Why not go for a wireless network? It will be a lot earlier.
 

Shude

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Originally posted by Peter D
A client needs 4 positions within their house to connect to broadband. Assuming BT place there equipment at the front door, what cabling would we need to run between each point and type of connection, standard, RJ45? We assumed cabling to be standard phone, 2 pair or above?
You want RJ45 sockets wired up to CAT5 cable. Wireless is good, but a few lengths of cable is cheaper, faster, a LOT more secure and a lot easier to set up :)
 

RichardM

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Re: Re: Cheeky Broadband question

Originally posted by Shude
You want RJ45 sockets wired up to CAT5 cable. Wireless is good, but a few lengths of cable is cheaper, faster, a LOT more secure and a lot easier to set up :)

I'd question that running cabling throughout a building is a lot easier to setup than a wireless network! Most wireless routers are very easy to setup and providing its done correctly can be made secure.
 

sym

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Re: Re: Re: Cheeky Broadband question

Originally posted by RichardM
I'd question that running cabling throughout a building is a lot easier to setup than a wireless network! Most wireless routers are very easy to setup and providing its done correctly can be made secure.

agree - although the wireless router that I have just installed is not ideally placed, and I really need to run a cable from my broadband connection to a more suitable location for the router . . . doesn't seem to work too well at the moment as located downstairs in the house, and I find that signal is really poor upstairs . . . think the router needs to be higher up !

S.
 

RichardM

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Mine is upstairs and works anywhere in the house and garden, I haven't tried installing it downstairs.
 

sym

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yeah - basic radio transmission principle I think . . . . I need a mast on the roof really (...perhaps that wouldn't be too secure actually LOL :D)
 

scotth_uk

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A quick look at my linksys wireless router's syslog is normally enough of a reason to turn most people off wireless networks.

Access attempts about every ten minutes.

Still, if correctly configured and thought given to placement it seems to work well enough to keep the enthusiast happy.
 

Alps

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that way your neighbours can share your connection too ;)
 

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Personally, I would go the hard rute and install the Cat5 - less to go wrong and the "clients" cant fiddle with the settings and screw things up so easily hense far less support in future.
 

sym

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Originally posted by scotth_uk
A quick look at my linksys wireless router's syslog is normally enough of a reason to turn most people off wireless networks.

Access attempts about every ten minutes.

Still, if correctly configured and thought given to placement it seems to work well enough to keep the enthusiast happy.

:eek: mine is a Linksys too . . . mind you, don't think either of my neighbours would know what to do with a PC, let alone "borrow" my wireless network !
 

Tan

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I have a similar dilema in my new office, because its a live work unit hard cables would be very difficult to hide so will look ugly, i have decided to go the wirless route. It is slightly more expensive but not by a huge amount. The best thing is that your client can then have access anywhere rather than just in four specific locations.

I hard wired two rooms at home but now due to the moving around of furniture cant use those points so will either have to rewire or go wireless.

BTW: For the guys that have gone wireless, what kit do you use? i have almost decided on the Netgear DG824M and usb wireless adapters unless anyone can recommend any other kit.

Regards

Tan
 

Big Ed

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Personally use a bit of both at home - have 100MB CAT5 from my study connected into a switch in the loft, with another connection from that switch going to my wifes study downstairs (need some decent bandwidth to the server in the loft for transferring DV files).

Also use an old Netgear 11Mbps wireless access point in my study to allow wireless access to the internet for both our laptops in the lounge or garden - speed works out fine since my ADSL becomes the bottleneck here. Have a few WEP problems using the built-in wireless in my Thinkpad at the same time as the Netgear PCMCIA card in my wifes laptop, so my network isn't the most secure at the moment :crazy: but our house is slightly out of the way, and I have kept an eye in the logs and haven't had anyone try and have a go in a couple of years now...

I haven't tried any of this new-fangled 54Mbps wireless stuff, so can't comment on the relative speed compared to Ethernet, but if it's just for Internet activities, rather than moving large chunks of data around, would have thought even wireless like mine would be up to the job.
 

scotth_uk

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I have a cheapo Linksys WAP11 AP, which works tremendously. It has removable/interchangable aerials, which is great for expanding the range in the future. I paid £100 for it a year ago and I imagine that they would sell for £40 on ebay these days.

The AP is then connected into a 10mbps port on a Cisco 1720 which also terminates the ADSL and the 100mb LAN. IOS Firewall, access-lists and IDS ensure first line defense. Cost WAY too much, but works a treat.

I chose Cisco Aironet 352 PCMCIA cards for my laptops, which are alongside the best in the business.

Keep in mind too, that the 54mbps draft standard is a load of old bollocks. It's definately faster, but not 5x.

Off topic: if anyone wants some 24 port Cabletron 10mbps switches, I have a few that are about to learn what the inside of a bin looks like. Full 19" rack width.
 

scotth_uk

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I haven't tried any of this new-fangled 54Mbps wireless stuff, so can't comment on the relative speed compared to Ethernet, but if it's just for Internet activities, rather than moving large chunks of data around, would have thought even wireless like mine would be up to the job.

Aint that the truth!

Don't attempt to drag 600mb+ files over a wireless link.
 

fuzzer

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Ive got a cable modem going into my loft through a Linksys Broadband router and then into a linksys Switch. The switch is connected via a patch pannel to the network sockets in every room and even some waterproof ports in the garden ( hehe) Ive got about 600m of cat 5e cable behind my walls in my house for both data and voice lines all going into Modular Wallboxes.

It was worth the Week long install as its really fast accessing my servers and moving files about.:bannana: :bannana:
 

AJTHOMAS

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Opted for D-Link equipment, good price at the time...

DI-614+ Broadband Router, 4 ports plus Wireless AP.
DWl-650+ PCMCIA Cards for the Laptop

Can't fault the wireless for plug'n'play simplicity.

Router is configured via the inbuilt web server and has the usual DNS, NAT, Firewall etc. built in and pre-configured.

Came with a free driver update to run the wireless link at 22mb with 256 bit encryption !
 
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Shude

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Originally posted by fuzzer
Ive got a cable modem going into my loft through a Linksys Broadband router and then into a linksys Switch. The switch is connected via a patch pannel to the network sockets in every room and even some waterproof ports in the garden ( hehe) Ive got about 600m of cat 5e cable behind my walls in my house for both data and voice lines all going into Modular Wallboxes.
Floodwiring is so much cooler than wireless fuzzer, good work!

My aim would be to have a couple of CAT5 cables and at least one COAX going into each room in the house for network and TV use, if you are re-decorating a room it makes a lot of sense to wire it up like that. In the loft or a spare room you have "node 0" which is where your rack of hubs/routers/switches/line terminators etc will live. You can then patch phones, PCs, internet fridges, TVs etc into whatever network you want without having to trail any wires around :)
 

Big Ed

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I'm disappointed - no one has mentioned installing air-conditioning, a 30AMP power supply, Cisco 6500's to run their backbone, or 42u server racks in their lofts yet - if a job's worth doing......

:D :D
 

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