condensation / misting in watches

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tjamesbo

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I've got this now in all of my watches (3 ) I always buy 3-5ATM minimum ,waterproof watches as I wear the watch 24/ 7 it stays on in the bath/ shower on when I windsurf and on in the sauna , not had a problem before even when batteries were replaced But even the timpson so many years guarantee didnt stop one misting ( cant find the receipt now ) but it seems to me that its unaffordable for me to return to manufacturer and anyone that fits a battery is not going to do it in a zero humidity day , in my mind it needs to be fitted when the humidity is low otherwise that humidity is in there just waiting to condense also i believe that some grease the seal with some kind of watchmakers / plumbers L.O.L. grease bit fed up as its on all of my watches now want to avoid it on the next one but my budget is limited and i do like a watch that has a bright colour not one for understated plain watches
any tips / advice ?
 
5 atm watches are just about splash proof rather than waterproof. Take them off when in the bath/shower/washing up.
 
couple are more than 5 cant remember exactly sure one was about 30 was a lot more than 3-5 tho
 
My watch has never leaked ... Mind you it's never been down 5000ft either! :cool: 🤣

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BreitlingSuperOcean-1.jpg
 
I’ve had 2 Garmin Triathlon watches that have leaked from swimming in the sea!!
Bear in mind if your sat at 1 bar of pressure at 33 ft on the Seabed, and then move your arm quickly the pressure on your watch will be a lot more than 1 bar!
Dynamic and Kinetic pressure comes into play.
It's a mathematical nightmare to work out, but that's why the Sports Diving Standard is 200 meters (20bar) for a watch.
That's 4 times the depth of an Air breathing Diver can go to safely.
 
30m / 3ATM is splash resistant. Is the case back pressed on or screwed on? If screwed on, remove and check the gasket, if it's a known brand like Casio, you can probably order a new gasket and some watch gasket lubricant like this: https://www.amazon.com/Seiko-TSF-45...qid=1698428333&sprefix=watch+g,aps,565&sr=8-7

Be sure it's silicone and not normal grease which could eat up the rubber. The reason for the grease is to maintain a seal and also to prevent the gasket from damaging as you screw it on.
 
Bear in mind if your sat at 1 bar of pressure at 33 ft on the Seabed, and then move your arm quickly the pressure on your watch will be a lot more than 1 bar!
Dynamic and Kinetic pressure comes into play.
It's a mathematical nightmare to work out, but that's why the Sports Diving Standard is 200 meters (20bar) for a watch.
That's 4 times the depth of an Air breathing Diver can go to safely.
I swim breaststroke in triathlons. Easy peasy.
 
If the watch was serviced under unsuitable conditions and moisture is trapped inside, condensation will appear from time to time. This has nothing to do with the watch rating.
 
If the watch was serviced under unsuitable conditions and moisture is trapped inside, condensation will appear from time to time. This has nothing to do with the watch rating.
Put the watch in the freezer for 10 minutes, then sit it face up on a radiator. If has any moisture in it, It'll Condence on the inside of the crystal.
If it does, whip the back off, and sit the watch face down on the radiator for ½ an hour.
Put it back together.
 
Put the watch in the freezer for 10 minutes, then sit it face up on a radiator. If has any moisture in it, It'll Condence on the inside of the crystal.
If it does, whip the back off, and sit the watch face down on the radiator for ½ an hour.
Put it back together.

If it's a divers watch, it should be closed with the air removed from inside, i.e. vacuum.
 
And how would you do that?
The only time a Vacuum is used by a Watchmaker is to test for leakage.
The watch goes in, a vacuum is pulled, then if the vacuum fails, then its because AIR is being drawn from the watch/seal.
I've worked on hundreds of Dive watches in my time. I've never worked in a Vacuum!
New to me?
 
The only time a Vacuum is used by a Watchmaker is to test for leakage.
The watch goes in, a vacuum is pulled, then if the vacuum fails, then its because AIR is being drawn from the watch/seal.
I've worked on hundreds of Dive watches in my time. I've never worked in a Vacuum!
New to me?

That's what I was referring to - I thought they were sealing them.
 
Hi , I have a Bulova watch that has a 300 metre depth on the face.

However , I can swim if required or go snorkeling all day but I really think that the watch would be crushed at 300 metre depth / and the diver !

It's accurate to 28 seconds over a 6 months period.

It's still an American brand but now owned by the Japanese but assembled in Hong Kong.

Boluva was used as the back up watch by NASA on the moon shots !
 

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