DIY Diamond Cut Alloys

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T5R+

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So, wanted to buy some alloys off a fellow forum member but sadly could not happen. So like all “men” looked on Ebay and decided to purchase a set and then planned to have them powder coated in a colour of choice.

EBay approach…..intentionally, bought a used set, as planned to give them to a bodyshop to refurbish AND also choose a seller close to the in-laws home…………..wife can spend time there and I could go off and “buy car stuff”. ;) So clicked on Ebay and arranged collection to tie in with a visit to the family.



Off I went to pay for the wheels. This set of wheels had definitely seen better days……..


Y77EAtGm.jpg


HQtNXZOm.jpg


TXOcagom.jpg


L5jb8kvm.jpg



The next day examined the horror wheels and realised that they were a mixture of painted and non-painted finish. I actually liked the contrast. Naturally, concluded that powder coating would result in a single finish and I would loose the shiny part. Somehow ended up thinking “refurbing a battered set surely cannot be that hard” (no drink was involved, this time!).


Okay, off we go to Youtube. A few videos later and the non-drink-induced thought pattern is:

  • It looks reasonably straight forward
  • If “he” can do it, then surely, I can also do it
  • I already have a few bits and pieces in the garage (which means a few incorrect grades of wet-and-dry sandpaper BUT all “men” know that the plan is to buy more “stuff” to do a “proper job”)
  • Now, where is my Amazon log in


Bzck3Jhm.jpg


KGYq6Apm.jpg



The actual process…….

  1. Wash thoroughly inside and out the absolutely filthy and disgusting wheels and let dry.
  2. In my case - did not see the need for masking tape.
  3. Select the appropriate grade of sandpaper depending on state of wheel(s) then start on a test patch. Rub past any marks ie avoiding pressing down in the problem area and thereby creating a “well”.
  4. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 240grit
  5. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 400grit
  6. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 800 grit
  7. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 1200grit
  8. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 2000grit
  9. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 3000grit
  10. See later


Some people will go from 400 to 1000 to 2000 grit. Suspect that it depends on your experience and state of wheel. I am new to this process and may well have wasted time/money/materials being a novice.

3f1LsO5m.jpg


r6yp4oum.jpg


jyCspTzm.jpg


GyzBTvVm.jpg


tEDvzpPm.jpg


wnJj6wDm.jpg


I went for a mixture of dry sanding and also wet-and-dry in the middle part. (As much driven by the sandpaper that I had at my disposal).

TIP You need to be patient – not a virtue that I am blessed with. :mad:



STEP 10 – once your wheel is fully smooth, finish with a cloth using metal polish of choice (I just happened to have 🙄 a tin of Autosol in a storage box) and then buff with a microfibre/cloth.

Sytr1Gfm.jpg


mAHA99Lm.jpg


IA8chQem.jpg


2FN9JjDm.jpg


HmtKmyfm.jpg









Have not got around to the next 2 steps but will over the next few weeks





STEP 11 – the wheel is now ready to be lacquered/clear coat. (I just happen to have some rattle cans left over from my last mad idea:doh: ).



STEP 12 – to aid future cleaning the wheel can be sealed using whatever you decide. (Have some Poorboys “pink” wheel sealant and so should use it rather than buy a ceramic sealant :dk: ).



Overall, for a £150 have some reasonable wheels that I may try on one of the cars. Actually, enjoy doing stuff like this and so am pleased to have learnt something new and different to my day job.


8ELMoZCm.jpg


IA8chQem.jpg


DvKUey8m.jpg



Couple of thoughts:

If you are an intermediate DIYer then rest assured that you can undertake this task. If you are a tradesperson or skilled, then it should be a doddle.

The finish on MB wheels is not flat but ever so slightly raised due to machine finish (think of it as tiny sharp mountains on a landscape). Your finish will be flat/smooth.

Cost is not the driver for me but the desire to undertake a new and different task.
 
Fantastic job! What a turnaround, should be rightly chuffed with yourself.
 
They look new, preps the key. I spent a week sanding a bonnet and then sanded it again.
 
I’ve tidied up a few alloys in my day including a diamond cut one on the CLS
I’m not going to admit it was me wot damaged it but I did feel a little crunch one day.

I use a 3m disc which twists onto an arbor and fitted to the drill.
My son used to blend aircraft turbine blades with them and they are disposed after short use. He got some from work, officially signed out and they work with great effect.

I’ve polished many engine parts when I used to show some of my classics
 
Brilliant!! Job. :cool: :)👍
 
Wowsers, top job!
 
Amazing reeeeeeesult!! You missed the part where you cracked open a beer (or three) and sat back admiring your work! ;)
 
So, wanted to buy some alloys off a fellow forum member but sadly could not happen. So like all “men” looked on Ebay and decided to purchase a set and then planned to have them powder coated in a colour of choice.

EBay approach…..intentionally, bought a used set, as planned to give them to a bodyshop to refurbish AND also choose a seller close to the in-laws home…………..wife can spend time there and I could go off and “buy car stuff”. ;) So clicked on Ebay and arranged collection to tie in with a visit to the family.



Off I went to pay for the wheels. This set of wheels had definitely seen better days……..


Y77EAtGm.jpg


HQtNXZOm.jpg


TXOcagom.jpg


L5jb8kvm.jpg



The next day examined the horror wheels and realised that they were a mixture of painted and non-painted finish. I actually liked the contrast. Naturally, concluded that powder coating would result in a single finish and I would loose the shiny part. Somehow ended up thinking “refurbing a battered set surely cannot be that hard” (no drink was involved, this time!).


Okay, off we go to Youtube. A few videos later and the non-drink-induced thought pattern is:

  • It looks reasonably straight forward
  • If “he” can do it, then surely, I can also do it
  • I already have a few bits and pieces in the garage (which means a few incorrect grades of wet-and-dry sandpaper BUT all “men” know that the plan is to buy more “stuff” to do a “proper job”)
  • Now, where is my Amazon log in


Bzck3Jhm.jpg


KGYq6Apm.jpg



The actual process…….

  1. Wash thoroughly inside and out the absolutely filthy and disgusting wheels and let dry.
  2. In my case - did not see the need for masking tape.
  3. Select the appropriate grade of sandpaper depending on state of wheel(s) then start on a test patch. Rub past any marks ie avoiding pressing down in the problem area and thereby creating a “well”.
  4. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 240grit
  5. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 400grit
  6. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 800 grit
  7. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 1200grit
  8. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 2000grit
  9. Move onto next grade of sandpaper and repeat 3000grit
  10. See later


Some people will go from 400 to 1000 to 2000 grit. Suspect that it depends on your experience and state of wheel. I am new to this process and may well have wasted time/money/materials being a novice.

3f1LsO5m.jpg


r6yp4oum.jpg


jyCspTzm.jpg


GyzBTvVm.jpg


tEDvzpPm.jpg


wnJj6wDm.jpg


I went for a mixture of dry sanding and also wet-and-dry in the middle part. (As much driven by the sandpaper that I had at my disposal).

TIP You need to be patient – not a virtue that I am blessed with. :mad:



STEP 10 – once your wheel is fully smooth, finish with a cloth using metal polish of choice (I just happened to have 🙄 a tin of Autosol in a storage box) and then buff with a microfibre/cloth.

Sytr1Gfm.jpg


mAHA99Lm.jpg


IA8chQem.jpg


2FN9JjDm.jpg


HmtKmyfm.jpg









Have not got around to the next 2 steps but will over the next few weeks





STEP 11 – the wheel is now ready to be lacquered/clear coat. (I just happen to have some rattle cans left over from my last mad idea:doh: ).



STEP 12 – to aid future cleaning the wheel can be sealed using whatever you decide. (Have some Poorboys “pink” wheel sealant and so should use it rather than buy a ceramic sealant :dk: ).



Overall, for a £150 have some reasonable wheels that I may try on one of the cars. Actually, enjoy doing stuff like this and so am pleased to have learnt something new and different to my day job.


8ELMoZCm.jpg


IA8chQem.jpg


DvKUey8m.jpg



Couple of thoughts:

If you are an intermediate DIYer then rest assured that you can undertake this task. If you are a tradesperson or skilled, then it should be a doddle.

The finish on MB wheels is not flat but ever so slightly raised due to machine finish (think of it as tiny sharp mountains on a landscape). Your finish will be flat/smooth.

Cost is not the driver for me but the desire to undertake a new and different task.
GORGEOUS chrome like finish. I did this finishing with autosol on a CLK320 years ago, chrome finish on the spokes and sparkly silver in between. No power tool, all by hand. Was my therapy lol 👍
 

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