Does anyone use Contactless payment cards or other digital payment such as Apple PAy?

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I think the measures proposed require an check each time the cumulative spend reaches c£85 - not per individual transaction

I have to use my pin to verify every 10th transaction which is more than £85 in total
 
Don't get me wrong, a cashless society would be ideal to stop tax dodging, which is rife, and I have been in many a works canteen where the vending machines only take pre loaded employee cards , or one machine might take a bank card, but those are used more as a cost saving device and not having to have a contractor/employee sorting bags of coins etc. The same probably applies to your local sports center, as for the trendy coffee shop, well , these places charge so much for a cup of hot brown water at the end of the day they would need a Group 4 van to take all the loot away , so I can see their point ! :D.

But we must focus on why a cashless society could be a really bad thing for the normal man in the street.
 
One establishment is our new local council owned sports centre. Why don’t they take cash? Who knows but I’ve never seen any elderly or travellers in there.
The other is a trendy coffee shop in Mill Hill Broadway. Reason being is that they kept getting robbed. There are plenty more coffee shops in the same area.
Darrell, my question “why so?” was aimed at the “shame in them” comment.

If I ran or owned a business with a relatively large number of relatively small transaction values - like the ones you mention - then I wouldn’t want to accept cash either.

Cash presents a security risk - both for robbery and employee theft - it’s also inefficient, as it takes time to reconcile, secure, etc.
 
It's simple economics why businesses don't like cash. It's because the banks charge them to pay it into their account.

I'm almost cashless already. On the positive side of electronic payments you can easily monitor spending. For example I'm currently replacing a bathroom and all expenditure will be recorded electronically right down to the few pounds spent on numerous visits to Toolstation for pipe fittings etc. When it's finished I'll be able to add it all up and see if it meets my £2000 target for materials.

On my last visit to Toolstation where I had ordered and paid on line, the guy in front of me paid with a handful of cash. I imagine that's a rare event and the store man was clearly struggling trying to count up all the coins. It took 10 times longer than my transaction.

The worst aspect of cashless payments for me is that the banks have recently become paranoid about security and will block your credit card at the drop of a hat particularly if your spending pattern changes e.g. your are spending a few thousand on a bathroom.. I've taken to using Paypal even for larger items like a £500 bath because it never gets blocked and is charged directly to the credit card anyway. My credit card is then paid off in full automatically by a direct debit.
 
Darrell, my question “why so?” was aimed at the “shame in them” comment.

If I ran or owned a business with a relatively large number of relatively small transaction values - like the ones you mention - then I wouldn’t want to accept cash either.

Cash presents a security risk - both for robbery and employee theft - it’s also inefficient, as it takes time to reconcile, secure, etc.
That was my fault, I should have been answering the ‘shame on you’ comment as well.
 
They are excluding two of the most vulnerable groups in our society from accessing their services.

The elderly and Travelers

Be very , very careful sleepwalking into a cashless society.

Yeah, the ‘travelers’ around here are very vulnerable with their brand new Range rovers, mahoooosive houses & caravans. Poor souls.
 
And allow banks and government to offer negative interest on ANY money you have in ANY account. Beware the cashless society.

Not really, they’d still be competing against each other to offer the best possible interest rate to savers. People would shift funds around to whoever offered the best.

Although point taken. Beware of the unknown.
 
I use apple pay for online purchases that accept it but at the counter I don't really see the difference between pulling out my phone or my wallet, essentially the motion itself is the same.

I have a separate account with limited funds for contactless and day to day use which I top up when needed which gives me a bit security should I lose the card.

To be honest I can't really say I'm to bothered either way about cashless society but like me uncle always says if you want to buy something pay in cash then you'll find out just how much you really want it.

He takes the stance that it is far to easy to pay for anything and to be honest I agree to a point, everywhere you go society is designed to get you to part with your money you could easy spend a £100 walking down a high street without ever seeing a pound coin and when you get home it doesn't feel like you have physically spent anything.

If you had a £100 in cash and as you walked down the high street parting with physical money watching your wallet dwindle would you spend the same amount?

If I have £3 in my pocket I'll purchase just a coffee rather than a coffee and sandwich (or vice versa) for £4.50.
 
I've taken to using Paypal even for larger items like a £500 bath because it never gets blocked and is charged directly to the credit card anyway. My credit card is then paid off in full automatically by a direct debit.

Be careful using Paypal as a front to a credit card as it can remove some of your rights as you are no longer directly contracted to the supplier. This means that you may not be able to go to your credit card company for recompense if something goes wrong.

One of the disadvantages of cashless is that if a card get stopped then it can cause issues. Always advisable to have more than one provider means of Payment. Some of the challenger banks are doing good work in bringing extra protections such as the ability to turn the card on and off. Some unfortunately like Revolut are also bringing problems where they are just blocking peoples accounts and taking months to do anything about it, not covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme, let alone the fact they are being investigated for money laundering practices and have the worst complaints per customer ratio of anyone.
 
British habits with cards are not the same as Europeans.

In France, contactless doesn't always require a PIN above the £30 level, and in Italy it's amazing how many places either won't accept cards - basically they're running on the black economy. I often pay for small bar / cafe items by cash and in Italy, you can often see them sweeping away the cash and unrecorded turnover.

The shocker about contactless in the UK, which is the standard way of paying for anyone under 30, is how they barely look at the total. Especially in London, they simply don't know how much they've paid for something. Fine if you're on £100k a year, but a bit foolish for anyone on average salary.

.
 
Be careful using Paypal as a front to a credit card as it can remove some of your rights as you are no longer directly contracted to the supplier. This means that you may not be able to go to your credit card company for recompense if something goes wrong.

I did wonder about that. I've tried talking to the bank saying look I'm about to do a project and my spending will go up but they won't or can't take anything like that into account any more. Basically you are at at the whim of a computer algorithm that decides to block your card or not. I know they are trying to stop fraud but last time my card was blocked it had already passed 2 factor authentication. I mean what's the point of having two factor if the computer ignores it and overrides with a block. It cost them because I withdrew all my savings and got £180 in compensation after I put in a formal complaint. I would have moved bank as well but I suspect most are as bad as each other.
 
I did wonder about that. I've tried talking to the bank saying look I'm about to do a project and my spending will go up but they won't or can't take anything like that into account any more. Basically you are at at the whim of a computer algorithm that decides to block your card or not. I know they are trying to stop fraud but last time my card was blocked it had already passed 2 factor authentication. I mean what's the point of having two factor if the computer ignores it and overrides with a block. It cost them because I withdrew all my savings and got £180 in compensation after I put in a formal complaint. I would have moved bank as well but I suspect most are as bad as each other.
The account probably wasn't blocked to protect you but to protect them under anti money laundering processes.
 
I use contactless for all purchases under £30 and have recently added my card to Google Pay to try it out. So far so good but I wish they would raise the limit or make it limitless like ApplePay (no I don't use Apple products)
As stated already, there is no limit on Google Pay. If your told it's £30, that's the retailer setting that limit, not Google Pay. If you don't like it find a retailer that does not set a limit and your fine.
 
I always find it amazing when anywhere in Italy or Greece DOES take cards........
Nearly all the places we visited last summer in Skiathos and Athens were taking cards without a problem and I’m talking about bars, cafes, tavernas and even gyros places and the water ski schools. Admittedly most of their card readers were tucked away in a little cupboard but they were there.
I think (but can’t be certain) that Greek businesses have to take a particular percentage of their income in electronic money.
 
As stated already, there is no limit on Google Pay. If your told it's £30, that's the retailer setting that limit, not Google Pay. If you don't like it find a retailer that does not set a limit and your fine.

Well every day is a school day lol. I thought this was the case but obviously some conflicting posts. I'll try it next time I spend over £30. Thanks
 
Not really, they’d still be competing against each other to offer the best possible interest rate to savers. People would shift funds around to whoever offered the best.

Although point taken. Beware of the unknown.
Yeah, the ‘travelers’ around here are very vulnerable with their brand new Range rovers, mahoooosive houses & caravans. Poor souls.
I was a tongue in cheek post...but if we did go cashless they would claim that they as a 'minority race' were being discriminated against !
 

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