Downloading films

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R2D2

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I have just realised that my laptop can write DVDs :eek: I wondered then can I download films that I have on video and replace them with my own DVD.

Pardon my naivity but how, what, when and where plus any problems or guidance?

Cheers
Guys
 
You need a VCR, some kind of video capture device (like a decent TV card) and some software.

Oh, you optionally need a seriously fast processor, loads of memory and a massive HDD otherwise you're talking about it taking days to encode movies rather than hours or minutes ;)
 
Sorry, I mean rather than copy them all, which will take ages, can't I download them and make a DVD.
 
Sorry, I mean rather than copy them all, which will take ages, can't I download them and make a DVD.
Yes, sorry it is more than possible for you to download a movie from various sources and burn as DVD.

Simply owning the VHS tape does not legally entitle you to burn DVDs of the same title. Strictly speaking it is not a legal matter but entirely civil.

It is not recommended that this sort of discussion is carried out on a public forum, whether technically legal or not!
 
Yes, sorry it is more than possible for you to download a movie from various sources and burn as DVD.

Simply owning the VHS tape does not legally entitle you to burn DVDs of the same title. Strictly speaking it is not a legal matter but entirely civil.

It is not recommended that this sort of discussion is carried out on a public forum, whether technically legal or not!

your assuming he is talking about copyright feature films. I read this as being that he's made a movie on his camcorder and put it onto VHS. Then wants to transplant it into the pc to write to dvd.
 
Why is the legal issue surrounding this so complex when Apple etc are all making Mp4 players etc selling the fact that you can watch films on them. Thefore having to copy a film inorder to be able to do this.
 
Sorry. I didn't realise this was a "difficult" area.
 
your assuming he is talking about copyright feature films. I read this as being that he's made a movie on his camcorder and put it onto VHS. Then wants to transplant it into the pc to write to dvd.
This gave it away:
Sorry, I mean rather than copy them all, which will take ages, can't I download them and make a DVD.
He wants to "download" them rather than "copy" them from existing tapes.
 
your assuming he is talking about copyright feature films. I read this as being that he's made a movie on his camcorder and put it onto VHS. Then wants to transplant it into the pc to write to dvd.

If that is really what he wants to do it is easier to transfer if through an ordinary DVD recorder from the Video player.;)
 
";) " ?? What do you suggest I do then?

Yep, first thing I did when I got my £70 DVD recorder was plug in my old VHS and dub my home movies!
You can always later upload these DVDs to a PC if you want to edit, share etc.

Shude - I think you will find that the whole issue of copyright theft is a far more open debate than it was and given the proliferation of licensed video downloads no longer are the two things intrinsically linked.
 
In answer to the original question I have just purchased the DVD's rather than copy the videos. The quality of tapes is shocking when you have been used to DVD.
 
If you mean by downloading films you actually mean feature films then yes you can do it but laptop dvd burners are notoriuosly crap for doing it. I have an AMD 64 bit laptop with a 16 speed burner in it and it's hopeless for doing this. Also, don't use P2P for your movie source as it'll take days and days to download a movie this way, instead use a good fast FTP server.
 
I wouldn't really mentioning where to get the films, may be breaking rules of the forum. A laptop shouldn't be too bad but maybe reduce the burning speed down to 10x. My guess is the laptop burners have a smaller buffer than a desktop burner.

Now if you want to backup your DVDs then you can't go far wrong with DVD Shrink.
 
Why is the legal issue surrounding this so complex when Apple etc are all making Mp4 players etc selling the fact that you can watch films on them. Thefore having to copy a film inorder to be able to do this.

In theory you are supposed to OWN the films and music you plan to listen to on your mp3/mp4 player... and by own, I do mean own the copyright or the film in that format, not just the media...

Hence, buying a DVD or music CD, converting it to mp4 or mp3 format and putting it on your iPod is totally and undeniably illegal in certain countries.

What are you supposed to do? Well, you know that lovely collection of disks you have? Take a piece of paper, note down all the titles, log onto iTunes shop (if you're an iPod owner) and buy the tracks/cds/videos you want in mp3/mp4 format.

Just because something makes sense doesn't mean its always legal...
 
In theory you are supposed to OWN the films and music you plan to listen to on your mp3/mp4 player... and by own, I do mean own the copyright or the film in that format, not just the media...

Hence, buying a DVD or music CD, converting it to mp4 or mp3 format and putting it on your iPod is totally and undeniably illegal in certain countries.

What are you supposed to do? Well, you know that lovely collection of disks you have? Take a piece of paper, note down all the titles, log onto iTunes shop (if you're an iPod owner) and buy the tracks/cds/videos you want in mp3/mp4 format.

Just because something makes sense doesn't mean its always legal...
Rubbish, copyright law does vary from country to country but you never own the copyright.

You purchase a licence from the copyright holder along with the physical media or download (unless you do it illegally or from a country where the licence does not support your usage e.g. downloading from dodgy sites). It is this licence that tells you what you can do with it.

"Hence, buying a DVD or music CD, converting it to mp4 or mp3 format and putting it on your iPod is totally and undeniably illegal in certain countries." - In theory yes because of the licence that came with the media doesn't extend to this copying, but there in no case law or precedent to confirm this theoretical risk.

Were people pursued en masse when they copied LPs to cassette or dubbed films from the TV to VHS? It is the same principle in law as copying purchased physical material to an iPod. It is simply that this new format is a) better quality and b) easier to copy and share. Therefore copyright holders are concentrating their efforts on 1. illegal downloading and 2. Digital Rights Management (such as that you describe within iTunes) to prevent copying and distribution to multiple sources.

There is no suggestion that if you digitally encode physical material for your own use that you have legally purchased that you will be prosecuted.
 

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