eBay fun

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At 9:30 this morning I received an email from eBay saying "Congratulations, your item sold and has been paid for". Not having sold anything on eBay for several years I just took it as yet another of those email scams and deleted it. At 10:27 I received another one, followed a couple of minutes later by a third. When I checked the sender's details they looked genuine as eBay so I logged on to my eBay account. Yikes - I've sold half a dozen Amazon Echo Dots at £15 a go! Help - how do I stop this.

For the next far too long I scoured eBay for information on how to stop a listing that's not mine. In the end I had to lie and say it was out of stock before anything would let me stop it. But now I had half a dozen buyers expecting their Echo Dots (whatever they are) and eBay charging me for the advertising. I needed to speak to someone and now. Could I find a contact number for eBay? Could I f***.

Eventually after trying numerous ways of making contact via countless options, a chat box popped up. Yes, I'm getting there. Hang on, I'm in a queue of about 5 minutes. Ten minutes later Marvin said "Hi, how are you today?" Resisting the obvious response I explained the problem and after apologising for my troubles he transferred me to Diana. Diana was also concerned about my health - by now dwindling - but a few lines later (on our keyboards, not white powder!) she said she'd transfer me to someone in another department who would get my issue resolved. Phillip also wanted to know how I was, but I held back and repeated what had happened. He checked everything then asked about an email address that was used to set up the listing. It wasn't mine. He then said that it appeared that my personal email address had been hacked and I needed to change my password immediately before doing anything else.

I went into my BT account and after a few attempts that failed for reasons way beyond me, I managed to change my password (that I'll need to change one all my devices of course). Then back to the eBay chat where Phillip said he'd wait and … It had timed out! So I had to start again; at least only waiting a couple of minutes this time. My old mate Marvin was there and I happily (!) recounted what had happened after I last chatted with him. He was genuinely apologetic before putting me straight through to Maria in the right department. During the minute or two it took to chat with Maria, I received a long email from eBay (presumably sent by Phillip) detailing everything I needed to do to change my eBay password and reset PayPal links. Thankfully Maria was very much on the ball and knew just what was happening. She told me to ignore the long list of instructions I'd just received and instead follow those on an email she was sending me. A few seconds later it arrived with a nice simple link to follow to change my eBay password. It worked and less than a minute later I had a new password - simples.

I checked my PayPal account and there was absolutely nothing there about money going in or out. Phew. After I'd changed the email password on my devices, more emails started to arrive from eBay confirming that each individual buyer had their money refunded and at no cost to me. Double phew! All now appears to be OK. Anyone want an Amazon Echo Dot?
 

Bellow

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There's an Amazon Prime scam on the go.
I took a phone call yesterday implying that while buying on Amazon I'd accidentally signed up for Amazon Prime (this did actually happen a couple of years ago and was rectified at the time).
This time, I'm told that Amazon have deducted £79.99 for AP and that because it was accidental and has to be refunded, I need an authorisation code to take to Amazon to enable it. So, my caller than gets me to open a Google page (all the time enquiring copiously as to the type of device I'm using) and gets me to open a ''quicksupport' site and instructs me to download the app. No thanks and bye bye.
 

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There's an Amazon Prime scam on the go.
I took a phone call yesterday implying that while buying on Amazon I'd accidentally signed up for Amazon Prime (this did actually happen a couple of years ago and was rectified at the time).
This time, I'm told that Amazon have deducted £79.99 for AP and that because it was accidental and has to be refunded, I need an authorisation code to take to Amazon to enable it. So, my caller than gets me to open a Google page (all the time enquiring copiously as to the type of device I'm using) and gets me to open a ''quicksupport' site and instructs me to download the app. No thanks and bye bye.

Had that call a few times. I do have a Prime account, so I just hit the big "off" button on the phone. Annoyingly, these calls come on the house line and are identified only as "International". So I can't find a way of stopping them, despite being on the TPS.

My daughter calls us on the house line, as does one friend. But 90% of the calls are scams/TPS breachers. If it didn't come with t'internet package I wouldn't bother with it at all.
 

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We don't have a phone attached to our phone line, and haven't done for about 5 years now. I wouldn't bother having it at all, but perversely it makes the overall package cheaper.
 
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gaz_l

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I had a similar thing a year or two back, got home from work to find I'd sold 40 or 50 pressure washers I hadn't listed! But eBay were very good (and quick) about sorting it all out.

Just shows what people's greed is like, though - who genuinely expects to get a £150 pressure washer for £36. Surely that must ring some bells with the buyer? Idiots.

Cheers,

Gaz
 

Bellow

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Had that call a few times. I do have a Prime account, so I just hit the big "off" button on the phone. Annoyingly, these calls come on the house line and are identified only as "International". So I can't find a way of stopping them, despite being on the TPS.

My daughter calls us on the house line, as does one friend. But 90% of the calls are scams/TPS breachers. If it didn't come with t'internet package I wouldn't bother with it at all.

The guy that called me called from 01655 183912 and took me to this site >> TeamViewer – The Remote Connectivity Software and wanted me to click the blue 'download for free' button on the lower left. No Amazon branding in sight.
 

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We don't have a phone attached to our phone line, and haven't done for about 5 years now. I wouldn't bother having it at all, but perversely it makes the overall package cheaper.

In rural Scotland, the snails go door to door because it's faster than sending a text.....
Landline here is essential.
 

PXW

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The guy that called me called from 01655 183912 and took me to this site >> TeamViewer – The Remote Connectivity Software and wanted me to click the blue 'download for free' button on the lower left. No Amazon branding in sight.

In that case it might be worth making an online report at Information reports | Action Fraud

They probably can’t do anything practical but they will create an information report, all of which go to the police to help them monitor cybercrime. And since your guy has an identifiable phone number they do at least have a starting point.
 

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Dont talk about Amazon . I went to use it 7 days ago only to be told my password was wrong .
So i then go into a cercular roundabout way with the One Time Password after about 16 OTP i eventualy got in to reset my password ,,good ,,,and yes yopu guessed it,, it was refused yet again .Phone up by use of the free number and speak to a virtual no brainer , only to find out the phone number is no longer used for support . I gave up in the end they can stuff Amazon from now on ..
 
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moonloops

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My daughter calls us on the house line, as does one friend. But 90% of the calls are scams/TPS breachers. If it didn't come with t'internet package I wouldn't bother with it at all.

There are a couple of BT phones you can buy that have call screening. Basically unless the caller is known by the phone it challenges the caller, at which point most of them hang up.
 
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There are a couple of BT phones you can buy that have call screening. Basically unless the caller is known by the phone it challenges the caller, at which point most of them hang up.
My wife uses our landline for her business so we can’t have call screening or she’ll risk missing calls from customers wanting to make appointments. It’s always fairly easy to detect the rogue calls so immediately after putting the phone down on them we dial 1572 and get them blocked by BT.
 

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There's an Amazon Prime scam on the go.
I took a phone call yesterday implying that while buying on Amazon I'd accidentally signed up for Amazon Prime (this did actually happen a couple of years ago and was rectified at the time).
This time, I'm told that Amazon have deducted £79.99 for AP and that because it was accidental and has to be refunded, I need an authorisation code to take to Amazon to enable it. So, my caller than gets me to open a Google page (all the time enquiring copiously as to the type of device I'm using) and gets me to open a ''quicksupport' site and instructs me to download the app. No thanks and bye bye.

Got round to checking bank accounts today. No deductions of £79.99. Definite scam.
 
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Bellow

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In that case it might be worth making an online report at Information reports | Action Fraud

They probably can’t do anything practical but they will create an information report, all of which go to the police to help them monitor cybercrime. And since your guy has an identifiable phone number they do at least have a starting point.

Done - and thanks for the prompt.
The website I was guided to (by the scam caller) is no longer available.
 
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markjay

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In that case it might be worth making an online report at Information reports | Action Fraud

They probably can’t do anything practical but they will create an information report, all of which go to the police to help them monitor cybercrime. And since your guy has an identifiable phone number they do at least have a starting point.

ActionFraud is a database, they can generate a Crime Reference Number or an Incident Reference Number for you, but they are not part of the police.

The police can access the ActionFraud database if they need to do so for their investigations, but in the majority of cases the police do not get notified of fraud complaints logged with ActionFraud.

ActionFraud will automatically report to the police fraud incidents where more than £100,000 have been taken.

The database also has algorithms in place, that will generate an automated report in the event that certain identifying details such as telephone numbers (but only if they are UK telephone numbers) and email addresses are referred to in a large number of unrelated fraud reports. The rationale behind it is that these sort of fraud complaints are worth investigating because ther's a more relastic chance of solving them (as opposed to majorty of frauds and scams).

But other than the above, fraud complaint will just lie dormant in the ActionFraud database.

Also, if there was a fraud attempt that failed, i.e. no monies were taken, you will be issued with an Incident Reference Number, and not with a Crime Reference Number. These is a bit cheeky, because this means that attempted fraud is not logged as an alleged 'crime', but as an incident, which obviously helps crime figures. Also, when another party is involved, e.g. a bank, ActionFraud might insist on issuing an Incident Reference Number, on the premise that the bank will report it to ActionFraud their end, which will create a duplication in crime reports (and figures).

Sadly, I know how ActionFraud works more than I would like to...
 

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ActionFraud is a database, they can generate a Crime Reference Number or an Incident Reference Number for you, but they are not part of the police.

The police can access the ActionFraud database if they need to do so for their investigations, but in the majority of cases the police do not get notified of fraud complaints logged with ActionFraud.

ActionFraud will automatically report to the police fraud incidents where more than £100,000 have been taken.

The database also has algorithms in place, that will generate an automated report in the event that certain identifying details such as telephone numbers (but only if they are UK telephone numbers) and email addresses are referred to in a large number of unrelated fraud reports. The rationale behind it is that these sort of fraud complaints are worth investigating because ther's a more relastic chance of solving them (as opposed to majorty of frauds and scams).

But other than the above, fraud complaint will just lie dormant in the ActionFraud database.

Also, if there was a fraud attempt that failed, i.e. no monies were taken, you will be issued with an Incident Reference Number, and not with a Crime Reference Number. These is a bit cheeky, because this means that attempted fraud is not logged as an alleged 'crime', but as an incident, which obviously helps crime figures. Also, when another party is involved, e.g. a bank, ActionFraud might insist on issuing an Incident Reference Number, on the premise that the bank will report it to ActionFraud their end, which will create a duplication in crime reports (and figures).

Sadly, I know how ActionFraud works more than I would like to...

So I've just gone through the motions without any real benefit to anyone..
Trying to remain positive - at least there is a database that can be accessed to at least get a handle on the scale of frauds or attempted frauds. No problem was solved without first being identified as a problem.
 
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ActionFraud will automatically report to the police fraud incidents where more than £100,000 have been taken.

I've a vague recollection that Action Fraud will flag to the police if a single fraud aggregates £100k+

As an aside I was, at one time, on the D-list for details of scams against banks and other FS firms, they were truly imaginative.
 

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So I've just gone through the motions without any real benefit to anyone..
Trying to remain positive - at least there is a database that can be accessed to at least get a handle on the scale of frauds or attempted frauds. No problem was solved without first being identified as a problem.

Over the years I have reported fraud and fraud attempts to ActionFraud on several occasions. It was a requirement from the bank / lender etc that I provide them with a Crime Reference Number (or Incident Reference Number) before any refunds are made. I never heard anything back (nor was I expecting to).
 

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At 9:30 this morning I received an email from eBay saying "Congratulations, your item sold and has been paid for". Not having sold anything on eBay for several years I just took it as yet another of those email scams and deleted it. At 10:27 I received another one, followed a couple of minutes later by a third. When I checked the sender's details they looked genuine as eBay so I logged on to my eBay account. Yikes - I've sold half a dozen Amazon Echo Dots at £15 a go! Help - how do I stop this.

For the next far too long I scoured eBay for information on how to stop a listing that's not mine. In the end I had to lie and say it was out of stock before anything would let me stop it. But now I had half a dozen buyers expecting their Echo Dots (whatever they are) and eBay charging me for the advertising. I needed to speak to someone and now. Could I find a contact number for eBay? Could I f***.

Eventually after trying numerous ways of making contact via countless options, a chat box popped up. Yes, I'm getting there. Hang on, I'm in a queue of about 5 minutes. Ten minutes later Marvin said "Hi, how are you today?" Resisting the obvious response I explained the problem and after apologising for my troubles he transferred me to Diana. Diana was also concerned about my health - by now dwindling - but a few lines later (on our keyboards, not white powder!) she said she'd transfer me to someone in another department who would get my issue resolved. Phillip also wanted to know how I was, but I held back and repeated what had happened. He checked everything then asked about an email address that was used to set up the listing. It wasn't mine. He then said that it appeared that my personal email address had been hacked and I needed to change my password immediately before doing anything else.

I went into my BT account and after a few attempts that failed for reasons way beyond me, I managed to change my password (that I'll need to change one all my devices of course). Then back to the eBay chat where Phillip said he'd wait and … It had timed out! So I had to start again; at least only waiting a couple of minutes this time. My old mate Marvin was there and I happily (!) recounted what had happened after I last chatted with him. He was genuinely apologetic before putting me straight through to Maria in the right department. During the minute or two it took to chat with Maria, I received a long email from eBay (presumably sent by Phillip) detailing everything I needed to do to change my eBay password and reset PayPal links. Thankfully Maria was very much on the ball and knew just what was happening. She told me to ignore the long list of instructions I'd just received and instead follow those on an email she was sending me. A few seconds later it arrived with a nice simple link to follow to change my eBay password. It worked and less than a minute later I had a new password - simples.

I checked my PayPal account and there was absolutely nothing there about money going in or out. Phew. After I'd changed the email password on my devices, more emails started to arrive from eBay confirming that each individual buyer had their money refunded and at no cost to me. Double phew! All now appears to be OK. Anyone want an Amazon Echo Dot?
BUT , now that you've told all of us your new eBay password is 'simples' , you'll have to change it again !!!
 

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Over the years I have reported fraud and fraud attempts to ActionFraud on several occasions. It was a requirement from the bank / lender etc that I provide them with a Crime Reference Number (or Incident Reference Number) before any refunds are made. I never heard anything back (nor was I expecting to).

Likewise - but attempted frauds only in my case.
Raising awareness is the best that can be said for it I suspect.
 
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