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The increasingly technical and physical demands of driving an F1 CAR seems to be leading to younger and younger drivers. As such there are interesting parallels to be drawn with fighter pilot training.
What is the "optimal" age of a fighter pilot?
Appart from the obvious better reaction times and physical fitness the less obvious one is the cerebral ability to rapidly assimilate new information and utilise it which begins to gradually tail off at a surprisingly young age----23+ Experience and training can often compensate of course but the younger brain always will have have that inbuilt advantage.
 
The increasingly technical and physical demands of driving an F1 CAR seems to be leading to younger and younger drivers. As such there are interesting parallels to be drawn with fighter pilot training.
What is the "optimal" age of a fighter pilot?
Appart from the obvious better reaction times and physical fitness the less obvious one is the cerebral ability to rapidly assimilate new information and utilise it which begins to gradually tail off at a surprisingly young age----23+ Experience and training can often compensate of course but the younger brain always will have have that inbuilt advantage.
Some very quick drivers simply run out of ‘bandwidth’ in the race. Grosjean, Stroll are both examples of that.
 
So which one of us had the top 3 in Sprint qualifying all Mercedes powered.:dk:
I didn’t, but those conditions are a great leveller and don’t allow the drivers to get away with being over aggressive. Maybe Mercedes have ‘softer’ torque demand/throttle response settings which cost them pace in the dry, but help when it’s wet.
 
I didn’t, but those conditions are a great leveller and don’t allow the drivers to get away with being over aggressive. Maybe Mercedes have ‘softer’ torque demand/throttle response settings which cost them pace in the dry, but help when it’s wet.
It seems that the 'torque demand' pedal in the current crop of F1 cars is almost infinitely adjustable via software, so I suspect it tells us more about the the foot controlling the pedal on this occasion.

Not heard of Jesus Savez, was he any good? 🤭

He has been around a little while now, even prior to Monaco 1977....about 1977 years before....

monaco_jesus_saves.jpg
 
Only on Ch4 highlights, MB have a way to go, they way MV blew past Lewis in the DRS pass and then ran away was ridiculous.
 
Only on Ch4 highlights, MB have a way to go, they way MV blew past Lewis in the DRS pass and then ran away was ridiculous.
I did think Hamilton could have made it a little more difficult, but 1.5s a lap quicker than the rest of the field… Different formula. Would be so interesting to know what RB have found, because they really have a car and Max is taking full advantage.
 
Once MV went off into his own race, there was a decent race.

He must get really bored out front

(Admittedly he did have to work / actually race today to get there, but after he did....)
 
I’m sad enough to have watched it live……and I’m now back in front of my tv after being out with the dogs …
 
Some very quick drivers simply run out of ‘bandwidth’ in the race. Grosjean, Stroll are both examples of that.
I think we saw an example of this after the safety car today when Stroll appeared to have run out of bandwidth and into Ricciardo.... :dk::doh:
 
I think we saw an example of this after the safety car today when Stroll appeared to have run out of bandwidth and into Ricciardo.... :dk::doh:
What a lucky boy is he, to have Daddy buy him an F1 team...


Lance 'Baldrick' Stroll; quite literally a waste of space.
 
What a lucky boy is he, to have Daddy buy him an F1 team...


Lance 'Baldrick' Stroll; quite literally a waste of space.
It could be that Lance is one of the quickest 100 drivers in the world, but that's not really good enough when there are only 20 seats in F1.
You need a great deal more than to be sporadically quick.
 
It could be that Lance is one of the quickest 100 drivers in the world, but that's not really good enough when there are only 20 seats in F1.
You need a great deal more than to be sporadically quick.
Indeed. He might be ok in Indycar, but F1 is just too much of a challenge for drivers like him. It just has too many dimensions to keep in balance, especially when driving the car takes up too much processor time. The likes of Max, Lewis, Alonso (some great driving from him today and a BIG save which probably gave his underpants a bit of a shock) only use 10-20% of their brain to drive the car. The rest of their mental capacity is used to analyse what’s going on around them, checking the big screen to see what’s going on elsewhere and of course moaning on the radio…
 
I wonder just how much Fernando's heart rate increased in that moment ? Not to mention the involuntary bowel movement 💩
I doubt it even registered given he was able to apply exactly the right amount of ‘oppo’ in nanoseconds, and lost hardly a tenth in lap time. He has done it a few times before,(!) and with that comes the learning of how much opposite lock to apply, how quickly and the even trickier bit, when and how fast to remove it.
My guess he would have been more annoyed with the time lost than anyway upset by that incident. They are a different species!
 
I’m sad enough to have watched it live……and I’m now back in front of my tv after being out with the dogs …
Same here. I also joined in for the Max Verstappen show and I don't know why I bothered.
In fact I turned off and went to prepare the veg for dinner when the safety car came out, such was the lack of excitement.

When Crofty gets animated over a pit stop and tyre choice you know F1 just doesn't cut it for the spectator any more.
MotoGP all the way for me from now on. Now that really is edge of the seat racing.

I'm off to Brands Hatch in two weeks for the GT racing. It's a first after the BSB event last year. Hope its just as good a spectacle.
 
Go faster sandwiches ;)
That could well be the secret of Max and the Red Bull car, but I'd like to offer an even more far fetched theory....
Correlation
I believe that under the direction of Adrian Newey, the Red Bull team are the leaders in getting the 'holy trinity' of the mechanical modelling, the wind tunnel running and the CFD to correlate with the real car 'on track' behaviour.
I'm currently preparing a column on this subject for the publication Racecar Engineering and I'm having a great deal of trouble getting any of my contacts in F1 talking about the subject. That indicates to be that I'm stepping into a very sensitive area!
The fact that Mercedes are continually surprised by their pace (or lack of it) at any given venues and Red Bull aren't tends to support this.
So I believe that it is nothing physical on the car that you can see, but a process and understanding of the car that is making the difference.

Of course I could be wrong....but I know after 40 years in motorsport that understanding what the car is doing is the key to going quickly.
 
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Same here. I also joined in for the Max Verstappen show and I don't know why I bothered.
In fact I turned off and went to prepare the veg for dinner when the safety car came out, such was the lack of excitement.

When Crofty gets animated over a pit stop and tyre choice you know F1 just doesn't cut it for the spectator any more.
MotoGP all the way for me from now on. Now that really is edge of the seat racing.

I'm off to Brands Hatch in two weeks for the GT racing. It's a first after the BSB event last year. Hope its just as good a spectacle.
I think Mr Chandhok put it well.

Appreciate the dominance up front and enjoy the battles behind.

Perfect analogy. Awesome racing throughout the field today.

AND a McLaren p2. 🥳
 

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