Have all motoring manufactures given up on SAFTEY?

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MSG2004

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Feb 5, 2005
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GLE, AMG Line
Hello.
Looking on the net for a new car, all cars that initially interested me are no longer of any interest.
This is because the fools (car design/profit team) put gimmickry before safety and have decided to go almost knob/button free

When these motor makers carry out customer service/want tests - the cars are stationary in a non-pressurised real world of driving in the dark, unlit motorways A/B roads in the pouring rain. Most will agree it is much easier to reach out for a knob as driving to turn the fan up/down and turn on/off temperature control of car seats

Using a hand held mobile is dangerous and against the law rightly so and texting even more so and we've all seen retards trying to text etc. But looking at, then touching the screen and hoping your finger is not moving by the movement in the car is as bad if not worse than the aforementioned.

Even the younger members of our family agree that some knobs in car should be a must (I don't mean drivers that are texting whilst trying to driver, lol)


Thankfully, in recent months some of the press is picking up on this.
 
This has been one of my bugbears for some time now.

There's a very good reason that motor vehicles have traditionally had tactile controls, which is so that they can be located and operated by the driver without taking their eyes off the road and with minimum distraction. Touch screen operated controls are a very poor substitute for that.
 
Totally agree , have a look at the total muppetry that is the fixed air vents in the Porsche Taycan EV . air can only be directed by entering a sub menu and swiping on the touch screen.

The people who signed this off should be banned for life for ever designing any kind of Human Machine interface.
 
I agree with all that's been said so far but add that there are buttons for climate on my Mondeo but they're so small that I still have to take my eyes off the road to see what I'm pressing so, more buttons please but at a decent size to use safely!
 
Does the automated stuff fall into this category of gimmick before safety?

Auto headlight that must see me before fading out those LED bits that dazzles me (but too late), or dimming those powerful LED's all together.
For dinosaur me the manual control of these means I see headlights approaching a horizon and dim in advance.
 
Odds on a touch screen’s cheaper…
I'm sure it is, and there's also the vast array of functions to control in a modern car which would make the button count rather high, but I still think that touch screen controls (for primary functions) in a car are a bad idea.
 
Odds on a touch screen’s cheaper…
Funny that, they are; must be a coincidence ;)

One factor is the age of the 'designers'. I recall reading about, I believe, Sir William Lyons in the '60s, saying that '60-year-old designers don't design for 20-year-olds and 20-year-old designers don't design for 60-year-olds. Having been closely involved in the styling/designing of all Jaguars up until that time, he wanted some input from younger people. I've no doubt the priciples still apply today.

Personally, I *hate* touchscreens in cars, a definite backward and dangerous step.
 
I was trying to Google about touch screens and accidents. Looks as though they (some media) have already noted this ie touch screens contributing to accidents in the USA that is

On the rare occasion i have to answer the hands-free phone while driving - I've noted I'm not paying 100% attention to the roads - calls were from doctors/hspts etc - to concentrate on important calls was hard and if i was able to find safe parking I would


How can those that set out safety for cars/driving allow almost 100% touch screen displays as clearly in my view, a touch screen is more dangerous than holding a mobile phone when answering a call

I'm actually certain there will be a few big accidents where the driver survived and admitted to having difficulty trying to demist their car screen when the weather conditions changed as the driver was driving.


I can see Tesla's reasoning as the cars were supposed to self-drive. But the others can't or are not allowed.

I'd be interested to find out how it was deemed safe to produce knobless cars. I think I know the answer, its as the other guy here said, "cheaper" to produce. Therefore, 2 fingers to safety

Euro NCAP and the like should factor in their touch screens and ease of use for the main items, namely: fan speeds, heat controls and their directions, heat/cool seats, window demist, hands-free/radio volume and station selection controls.
 
Much as they (touch screens) are annoying, less easy to use than physical buttons.....and, in my opinion, usually look cheap and tacky...hello EQE full width screen dash...yuck!)....I'm not aware of their owners dying whole sale. Figures I've have seen show only a very slight difference to analogue cars. My AC is all physical buttons...but there are about 20 of them....so apart from the most basic adjustments I still have to take my eyes off the road to adjust anything else....but I don't crash....because I'm not stupid!. I change it in queues, when waiting at lights, railways gates etc etc. If you crash your car using a touch screen I can't really see it being anyone's fault but the drivers .....certainly not the cars maker. Not to mention the car was like that when you bought it...if you don't like it or don't think you could trust yourself to drive it safely because of touch screen controls.....then buy something else.

EDIT....just checked...there are 15 separate controls on my AC.....I doubt I'll make it to work alive tomorrow with that level of distraction!

We live in a society where everyone blames their mistakes on someone or some thing else.....not keen myself! Sure screens don't make things easier.....but they're not a major catastrophe either....

.......personally i just prefer look of real buttons and more importantly real dials!
 
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Agree with the above. Our Tiguan has touchscreen for sat-nav and Car Play etc. Using it whilst driving is a pain compared to the armrest ‘puck’ controlled COMAND system in our Mercedes.
 
One manufacturer has relented due to customer feedback. Using touch screens because they are cheaper doesn't help the bottom line if it means you sell fewer cars. Buyers do have a vote on this.

Volkswagen brings back physical buttons for all new cars | Autocar

More seriously than my previous post, I remember sitting in a new electric Skoda at a show in Manchester a little while back and couldn't work out how to turn the radio volume down. I was with friends and once I'd finally found the control each of us invited another to do the same. All stumped. Some bizarre sliding set up along the bottom of the large central touchscreen. Brush a finger far left for down, far right for up. No control on the steering wheel either. Bizarre.
 
More seriously than my previous post, I remember sitting in a new electric Skoda at a show in Manchester a little while back and couldn't work out how to turn the radio volume down. I was with friends and once I'd finally found the control each of us invited another to do the same. All stumped. Some bizarre sliding set up along the bottom of the large central touchscreen. Brush a finger far left for down, far right for up. No control on the steering wheel either. Bizarre.
I don't understand how this sort of thing gets signed off. It's like the actual purpose of the car has been forgotten or at least put in the background in favour of making the cabin look like something out of Star Trek. Perhaps in a world of autonomous cars, the monkey holding the steering wheel or 'driver' will have more time and attention span to play with touchscreen gizmo technology, whilst of course being fully in control of the vehicle at all times even though they are not.
 
I don't understand how this sort of thing gets signed off. It's like the actual purpose of the car has been forgotten
Quite.

I watched the What Car? video review of the latest incarnation of the Tesla Model 3 which has dispensed with the steering column stalks. This means that you have to use the touch screen to select from P-R-N-D rather than having a physical drive selector. "What happens if the touchscreen packs up?" asked the reviewer as a rhetorical question, and then pointed to a series of P-R-N-D selector buttons on the headlining above the rear view mirror.

So this height of ergonomic idiocy has not only made selecting the drive harder, it hasn't saved a penny either because they've duplicated the function with oddly sited physical buttons. Talk about a solution looking for a problem...
 
Quite.

I watched the What Car? video review of the latest incarnation of the Tesla Model 3 which has dispensed with the steering column stalks. This means that you have to use the touch screen to select from P-R-N-D rather than having a physical drive selector. "What happens if the touchscreen packs up?" asked the reviewer as a rhetorical question, and then pointed to a series of P-R-N-D selector buttons on the headlining above the rear view mirror.

So this height of ergonomic idiocy has not only made selecting the drive harder, it hasn't saved a penny either because they've duplicated the function with oddly sited physical buttons. Talk about a solution looking for a problem...
Cars are not aircraft…
 
One manufacturer has relented due to customer feedback. Using touch screens because they are cheaper doesn't help the bottom line if it means you sell fewer cars. Buyers do have a vote on this.

Volkswagen brings back physical buttons for all new cars | Autocar
Ah yes, VW Group.
Who's HMI boffins decided that on the latest iteration of the SEAT Leon, not only would they move all the HVAC controls from physical buttons to a menu driven selection, but also it was a great idea that the haptic sliders for the temperature controls, which lurk somewhere at the bottom of the touchscreen unit, are not illuminated at night.
 
"cheaper" it is ad this is confirmed via many articles in the media
However, are there no regulations in the UK re safety that could easily determine that
cars that are almost button/knob less are dangerous?
 

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