JCB & Mercedes

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",,, proving the wider appeal of hydrogen combustion technology by installing one of its hydrogen engines into a Mercedes Sprinter van."
I do wonder what sort of fuel storage they have used.
If it only takes up the space previously occupied by the Derv tank, and offers decent range without too much additional weight then that will be good.
 
Now all we need a few thousand hydrogen refuelling stations ;)


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Still not investing in JCB shares.... but I do bid them good luck!
 
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Now just got to find a way of making hydrogen that isn't only only 10% as efficient as running the car directly on electricity......not to mention find LOTS of spare electricity (made from renewable sources) to make the stuff in the first place! Cant see it happening in my lifetime.
 
I am sure they could find a way that's better than raping the earth for rare earth metals using massive diesel powered plant equipment to make small batteries. Then shipping it around the world several times, and using huge amounts of carbon to produce the green Ev's we drive. Which use more power to charge combined than to produce hydrogen. ;-)

The biggest hurdle isn't the technology, infrastructure or cost, its the politics and nobody can get rich quick from hydrogen. BEV's are simply adapted old tech from the old IT UPS systems to power cars instead of back up power supplies for servers, hospital etcs.
It was relatively quick to implement and Tesla woooed everybody with their model S and free super charging for life..

We were sold a pup with BEv's..
 
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Now just got to find a way of making hydrogen that isn't only only 10% as efficient as running the car directly on electricity......not to mention find LOTS of spare electricity (made from renewable sources) to make the stuff in the first place! Cant see it happening in my lifetime.

I have no view on Hydrogen either way. However, I wouldn't bet on it for the simple reason that no one is currently building a national refuelling infrastructure, while there are new electric car chargers popping-up every day. When they'll start adding Hydrogen fuelling pumps to existing petrol stations, or start building new Hydrogen refuelling statios, then I'll accept that Hydrogen may have a future in the UK.
 
Now all we need a few thousand hydrogen refuelling stations ;)


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Very true, we also need a few hundreds of thousands more of "battery powered" EV chargers to stop the queues forming while people have a coffee and wait an hour to charge their car (as their life ebs away).. just saying.
 
I am sure they could find a way that's better than raping the earth for rare earth metals using massive diesel powered plant equipment to make small batteries. Then shipping it around the world several times, and using huge amounts of carbon to produce the green Ev's we drive. Which use more power to charge combined than to produce hydrogen. ;-)

The biggest hurdle isn't the technology, infrastructure or cost, its the politics and nobody can get rich quick from hydrogen. BEV's are simply adapted old tech from the old IT UPS systems to power cars instead of back up power supplies for servers, hospital etcs.
It was relatively quick to implement and Tesla woooed everybody with their model S and free super charging for life..

We were sold a pup with BEv's..

Almost :)

UPS systems mostly use Lead Acid batteries to this very day - Li-ion batteries started to appear in UPS systems only a couple of years ago and it's still a niche market.

Li-ion initially replaced NiCad in rechargeable batteries, and later became widely used in laptops. In fact, the first electric car that Elon Musk built was powered by a huge stack of laptop batteries.
 
Which use more power to charge combined than to produce hydrogen. ;-)
No....hydrogen is very inefficient.....takes LOADS of electricity to make and I mean loads. If you burn it in a ICE car its between 20 to 40% efficient (sane as a petrol engine)..if use use it to generate electricity to power the car (as in fuel cell cars)....it just gets worse. If you use electric to power the car directly its about 90 plus percent efficient. Put the electricity through all the stages to make hydrogen and burn it in an ice car....its around 10% efficient. The numbers just don't add up. And these days making an EV makes hardly any more carbon than building an ICE car. And of course hydrogen burning cars still produce NOX. With current technology and with the percentage of electricity we generate with renewables (about 50%), hydrogen cars just don't add up. Maybe one day.....but with current tech and electricity generation its a no go....both financially and environmentally.

 
No....hydrogen is very inefficient.....takes LOADS of electricity to make and I mean loads. If you burn it in a ICE car its between 20 to 40% efficient (sane as a petrol engine)..if use use it to generate electricity to power the car (as in fuel cell cars)....it just gets worse. If you use electric to power the car directly its about 90 plus percent efficient. Put the electricity through all the stages to make hydrogen and burn it in an ice car....its around 10% efficient. The numbers just don't add up. And these days making an EV makes hardly any more carbon than building an ICE car. And of course hydrogen burning cars still produce NOX. With current technology and with the percentage of electricity we generate with renewables (about 50%), hydrogen cars just don't add up. Maybe one day.....but with current tech and electricity generation its a no go....both financially and environmentally.


Hydrogen as an energy source will likely be the very long term solution, given that Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, and so once we figure it out we'll never be short of energy. But whether Hydrogen will be used as fuel in cars (combustion or fuel cell), or just in power plants generating electricity, remains to be seen.
 

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