Liqui Moly

Discussion in 'Parts, Maintenance & Servicing' started by GillyC63, Jan 24, 2020.

  1. GillyC63

    GillyC63 Active Member

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    Evening all

    Just wondering if anyone has used this oil & if so their thoughts on it.
    Seems a popular choice in the US.
    :)
     
  2. Rorywquin

    Rorywquin Hardcore MB Enthusiast

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  3. Teego

    Teego Hardcore MB Enthusiast

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    Don't trust the Americans falling for marketing BS.
    For your C63 I'd stick to Mobil1.
     
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  4. Gazwould

    Gazwould Hardcore MB Enthusiast

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    There's always better products but it's not snake oil .

    "Tungsten Disulfide (WS2) and Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) are two of the most popular industrial dry film lubricants. Both are similar in terms of appearance, color, and high chemical durability. Both are dry lubricants, non magnetic, and are compatible with liquids such as paint, oil, fuel, and solvents. They can be applied on almost all surfaces for industrial purposes including iron, steel, plastic, aluminum, and copper. While both come from the same chemical family, there are certain differences that make them unique and thus, suitable for different industrial applications.

    Differences between Tungsten Disulfide and Molybdenum Disulfide

    Though they are similar in many properties, one can find a few differences between the two lubricants that set them apart.
    • Co-efficiency of Friction: Tungsten disulfide is perhaps the most lubricious material known to man. It is known to be a very low Coefficient of Friction (COF) at 0.03. Molybdenum disulfide also comprises good friction capabilities. It can provide a friction coefficient of up to 0.05. Both can be easily applied onto various metallic surfaces. This is the reason why the automotive industry is one of the most popular applications of both Ws2 and MoS2.
    • Weight and Density: For a dry film lubricant coating, the higher the molecular weight, the more stable it is. Tungsten disulfide has been found to have a molecular weight of 248, while molybdenum disulfide is 160.08. A similarity is also found in their respective densities. Ws2 has a density of 7500 Kg.m-3, while MoS2’s density is 5060 Kg.m-3. As they come from the same chemical family, Mos2 can be replaced by Ws2 in an industrial application.
    • Thermal Stability: Tungsten disulfide has the ability to operate in high air conditions. Beginning with a low COF of 0.01, its air thermal stability rate can increase up to 1100oF. With MoS2, it is slightly different. The basic COF is also 0.01, but it only provides an air thermal stability rate of 600oF. However, MoS2’s coefficient can be raised to 0.05, in which case, the thermal stability rate of MoS2 increases to 1100oF.
    • Load Bearing Capacity: This is one area where tungsten disulfide has a bigger advantage over molybdenum disulfide. On an average, Ws2 can provide high load bearing capacities between 200,000 and 400,000 psi at COF of 0.024 for coated films. MoS2 has the capability to provide load bearing capacities of up to 250,000 psi.
    • Temperature Range: This feature is always considered when choosing one of the dry film lubricants for industrial applications. The temperature range of a dry film lubricant is based on two aspects – ambient and vacuum temperature. Tungsten disulfide can operate anywhere between -273oC to 650oC. As Ws2 performs better in extreme applications, it has the ability to provide a vacuum temperature range from -188oC to 1316oC. Molybdenum disulfide has a vast difference in its ambient and vacuum temperatures. In an ambient atmosphere, it operates between -185oC to 350oC. Its temperature range increases in a vacuum atmosphere between -185oC to 1100oC.
    Miscellaneous Advantages of Ws2:

    It is obvious to see that tungsten disulfide has a better edge over molybdenum disulfide. Other aspects that make Ws2 more suitable for industrial applications are:
    • It has a coating thickness of up to 0.5 microns.
    • Unlike MoS2, tungsten disulfide has the ability to provide good resistance against corrosion.
    • It has good electrical properties, making it a good option for semi conductor applications.
    • Tungsten disulfide can be used in a variety of applications including aerospace, military, semi conductor, automotive, and medicine.
    Depending on the application and the expected results, one should always give preference to tungsten disulfide for its strength, versatility, and durability."
     
  5. alabbasi

    alabbasi Hardcore MB Enthusiast

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    Liqui moly is a decent oil. As far as Cera Tec, that's an additive, not an oil. I have no idea how well it works, I suspect that if there's nothing wrong with your engine, you will not notice a difference and neither should you.
     
  6. saff

    saff Hardcore MB Enthusiast

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    Kent loves it!
     
  7. markjay

    markjay MB Club Veteran

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    I used Liqui Moly's Molybdenum Disulfide engine oil additive for many years.

    I stopped using it about 20 years ago, when oils became more sophisticated.

    I felt that modern engine oils are hi-tech products in themselves and probably don't need to be improved by aftermarket additives.

    But back in the seventies and eighties it was very common.

    Liqui Moly have since expanded into other products, but I haven't tried them so no idea if their engine oil is any good.
     
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  8. martini

    martini Member

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    Stick to Mercedes oil type recommendations. Never use any additional additives.
    The video above shows a single cylinder side valve lawnmower engine. Which does not have an oil filter. As far as I know Mercedes don’t make a single cylinder engine.
    If you want to prolong the engine life, simply change the oil and filter more often than recommended.
    In summary if you are tempted to use an oil additive...Don’t
     
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  9. Gazwould

    Gazwould Hardcore MB Enthusiast

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    I don't use Mercedes spec oil , I use VW because of it's higher anti wear , 2 turbos and a timing chain / tensioner , there's alot to protect .
     
  10. markjay

    markjay MB Club Veteran

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    Personally, I don't know enough about modern engine oil technology, and I am therefore not brave enough to try and improve on the car manufacturer's recommendations... and so I feel that it would be arrogant on my part to suggest I know better.

    That said, if you are savvy about the chemistry of modern lubricants, then by oil means read the spec sheets and use whatever engine oil you think is best for your car.
     
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  11. Azeem

    Azeem Hardcore MB Enthusiast

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    I have used Liqui Moly oil during my last two oil changes. I switched from Mobil delvac 5w40 to Liqui moly 10w40 (semi synthetic) for cost savings. I haven't noticed any performance difference between the two so far.
     
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  12. markjay

    markjay MB Club Veteran

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    The downside of using Liquid Moly though was that it turned fresh honey-coloured oil instantly into pitch black oil....... :(
     
  13. Azeem

    Azeem Hardcore MB Enthusiast

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    But it isn't liqui moly only, any fresh oil (including Mobil) put into diesel engine instantly turns black. That has been my experience so far
     

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