Meat and milk from cloned animals

Anyone concerned about cloned meat or milk in the foodchain?

  • Doesn't bother me in the least

    Votes: 27 60.0%
  • Might need to research it a bit before deciding

    Votes: 10 22.2%
  • Wouldn't touch it with a bargepole

    Votes: 8 17.8%

  • Total voters
    45

trapperjohn

MB Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 19, 2008
Messages
7,305
Location
Lancashire
Car
124 300D 24V Estate
Moo.

Seriously not worried one little bit. Is the art of animal husbandry not to repeat the best specimen example of breed time and time again. God knows what the AI man has been shoving into cows for years.
 

ringway

MB Enthusiast
SUPPORTER
Joined
Nov 29, 2008
Messages
7,164
Location
In a World of My Own.
Car
2017 Audi RS6 Avant. Audi A6 Avant 3.0 Bi TDI - A Fantastic Car! Range Rover Supercharged - Lovely!
I've just emailled Hugh Heferner about this.
 

trapperjohn

MB Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 19, 2008
Messages
7,305
Location
Lancashire
Car
124 300D 24V Estate
Its a load of old bulls really.
 

iscaboy

Active Member
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
604
Location
Devon
Car
W124 E300 D (1991)
most grain (all your bread, pasta, breakfast cereals, etc) is cloned and has been for years, if you shop at a big supermarket you can guarantee it.

cloning is dangerous because it is a monoculture, ask the irish about the spud famine.

what you SHOULD be worried about is chemicals and drugs used in food production, processing, packaging, and also from the environment... things like hormones don't get filtered, so women take the pill, take a piss, and (this is fact) it builds up in sea fish to such an extent that the fish start changing sex, and then those fish are caught and cooked and fed to humans...

Just look at any group photo taken between say 1950 and 1970, try and spot the obese bodies, you won't find any.
 
Last edited:

DITTRICH

MB Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 16, 2004
Messages
1,681
Location
London
Car
S205 C200SE & W202 C230K
cloning = duplicating something (natural) that already exists.
If one type of clone became predominant, this would reduce diversity in the gene "pool" and then some disease (say) kills all the clones because they aren't immune to it. Lack of diversity is an elevated risk to the population of cows but not to us as they are clones of a natural cow. Genetically modified animals are the ones to worry about as they are not natural. And as the above post says, the chemicals are to be feared more than anything else.
 

iscaboy

Active Member
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
604
Location
Devon
Car
W124 E300 D (1991)
One good example of cloned every day food.

Bananas.

Every single banana we eat is a clone, they are all Cavendish variety, and there are already signs that this monoculture will lead to them being destroyed as a crop within 20 years, thanks to the fact that any parasite or disease will have universal efficacy.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2001/07/0726_wirebanana.html
 

lancebond

Active Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2010
Messages
431
Location
Newcastle
Car
S203 C220 CDI
more meat for everyone!! clone away.

plus if they screw up, it means one chicken will provide enough legs for eight people!
 

Mr E

MB Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 22, 2004
Messages
1,591
Location
Sussex
Car
57 W211 E280 AG
One good example of cloned every day food.

Bananas.

Every single banana we eat is a clone, they are all Cavendish variety, and there are already signs that this monoculture will lead to them being destroyed as a crop within 20 years, thanks to the fact that any parasite or disease will have universal efficacy.

Lack of Sex Life Threatens Banana Crops
Did you actually read the article properly?

Yes, 90% of the dessert bananas produced are Cavendish. Dessert bananas constitute 15% of the bananas consumed, therefore 86.3% of bananas are not Cavendish.

By the strict definition of cloning as asexual reporoduction then yes, bananas are clones. There was a genetic mutation that turned the had black seeds into mush, but made it more edible. This meant plants had to be propogated via cuttings, budding, etc - in exactly the same way that many horticultural strains are produced and maintained today. For example, I've quadrupled the number of strawberry plants in my garden this year by propogating the suckers - which is exactly what banana farmers do.

All varieties of banana are suceptible to the fungus mentioned in the article, not just Cavendish. This is why the work into understanding the genome is important. The bit that was not reported is also the work going into understanding the genome of the fungus, so that this can be attacked too.

Most people who propogate plants, etc, would not consider this to be "cloning" in the same sense as animal cloning. Asexual reproduction is not only common in the natural world, but is also genetically stable. Much of the fruit we eat today is produced through propogation, or asexual reproduction.

When it comes to higher-order animals, asexual reproduction is very uncommon. What is done in the lab to clone a sheep, cow, pig or whatever is not an extension of a naturally-occuring process. It produces genetically unstable offspring.

Perhaps there is something instinctive in the way we feel about animal cloning - my grandfather would never counternance animal cloning and would say so while grafting apple trees.

BTW, I'm no banana fetishist - my caribbean in-laws are banana and sugar cane growers and are much better placed to comment than any of us are (good job they are visiting :) _
 

jasonyw

Banned
Joined
May 3, 2009
Messages
632
Did you actually read the article properly?

Yes, 90% of the dessert bananas produced are Cavendish. Dessert bananas constitute 15% of the bananas consumed, therefore 86.3% of bananas are not Cavendish.

By the strict definition of cloning as asexual reporoduction then yes, bananas are clones. There was a genetic mutation that turned the had black seeds into mush, but made it more edible. This meant plants had to be propogated via cuttings, budding, etc - in exactly the same way that many horticultural strains are produced and maintained today. For example, I've quadrupled the number of strawberry plants in my garden this year by propogating the suckers - which is exactly what banana farmers do.

All varieties of banana are suceptible to the fungus mentioned in the article, not just Cavendish. This is why the work into understanding the genome is important. The bit that was not reported is also the work going into understanding the genome of the fungus, so that this can be attacked too.

Most people who propogate plants, etc, would not consider this to be "cloning" in the same sense as animal cloning. Asexual reproduction is not only common in the natural world, but is also genetically stable. Much of the fruit we eat today is produced through propogation, or asexual reproduction.

When it comes to higher-order animals, asexual reproduction is very uncommon. What is done in the lab to clone a sheep, cow, pig or whatever is not an extension of a naturally-occuring process. It produces genetically unstable offspring.

Perhaps there is something instinctive in the way we feel about animal cloning - my grandfather would never counternance animal cloning and would say so while grafting apple trees.

BTW, I'm no banana fetishist - my caribbean in-laws are banana and sugar cane growers and are much better placed to comment than any of us are (good job they are visiting :) _
That like marrying your cousin repeatedly through the generations leading to less resistance to diseases, that why the Roman law does not allowed it.:eek:
 

corned

MB Enthusiast
Joined
May 2, 2008
Messages
3,894
Location
Living in error with Maude at Cap Ferrat
Car
car

Benzowner

MB Enthusiast
SUPPORTER
Joined
Jun 21, 2004
Messages
2,745
Location
Bristol
Car
Qashqai Acenta Premium 1.6Diesel
It seems ok to cross bread to produce a cow that produces more milk or a more beef but some seem to get upset when we take a short cut. Interestingly, the produce comsumed was from an offsprong of the cloned beast, they have not said if the offspring was the result of two cloned anilmal or one cloned and one natural. Personally if it produces good steaks then thats ok with me.:D:D
 

jocasta

Active Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2007
Messages
64
Location
Hertfordshire
Car
SLK 350 Obsidian Black
Didn't we eat BSE infected meat for years because our cattle were being fed other animal remains....:crazy: that was worrying!
 

Mr E

MB Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 22, 2004
Messages
1,591
Location
Sussex
Car
57 W211 E280 AG
That like marrying your cousin repeatedly through the generations leading to less resistance to diseases, that why the Roman law does not allowed it.:eek:
It is in the animal world, due to genetic instability. Not so in the plant world, where a more stable genome doesn't tend to produce the mutations in quite the same quantity.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top Bottom