Night driving glasses?

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I have suffered with the increasing effect of cataract w/o knowing it.
Diagnosed by Specsavers both eyes were done by the contracting out new style at Spa Medica, for free.

Less than a year later Specsavers diagnosed a worsening of eyesight due to the developing after effects of the ops. Specsaver said it was growing crystals behind the new lenses, SpaMedica said it was growing scar tissue?? Last week Spa Medica got around to lasering the right eye. My right eye is back to v good vision.

The night driving became a fear. I was doing all I could to avoid it
The yellow lens specs, cheapos of't net, were a fair help, but not a cure.
In fact a few weeks ago I was off to collect mum with the wheelchair capable Viano, to take her for her escape from her old persons prison. I didn't feel I could drive safely so returned home. In fairness that wasn't due to headlights though.

I can now drive at night w/o the aggro to my eyes I had, but yes the competition for the brightest headlights is a failure of our legislators by allowing it.
Some cars are worse than others, and I've found Minis are particularly bad, possibly due to their swept back design.

On a flat road I guess most LED headlights (on dipped) are acceptable, but v few of our roads are like that. If I, the victim, are lower, or the attacker is on a slightly upward incline, I get a face full.
Then there are those automatically dimming lights that must first see me before dimming. Too late, the bloody thing has seen me, so got me, over a rise, round a bend, even from a distance.

We have come to a point where manufacturers have super bright headlights (does that encourage those drivers to drive faster?) We have super bright DRL's rear lights, and definitely brake lights. But some how it seems some cars are having the indicators sited more discreetly, and can't compete with the vehicles own other lighting.

With a lot of the worlds advancements I don't see improved intelligence.

Just thought my story might be useful for other aging bods who drive while increasingly saying "ffs those fing lights".
Have had the cataract operation, the difference is amazing.
Before the operation had to stop driving at night and not safe above 40MPH in day time.
The DVLA eye sight test, I always passed the number plate test.
It's a appalling low standard and some thing should done about it.
 
Have had the cataract operation, the difference is amazing.
Before the operation had to stop driving at night and not safe above 40MPH in day time.
The DVLA eye sight test, I always passed the number plate test.
It's a appalling low standard and some thing should done about it.
It does seem rather inadequate. I know that in Switzerland for example you have to pass a proper eye exam that checks visual acuity and field of view.
 
I'll expand later on but there is absolutely no clinical basis for "night driving tints". The last thing you want to be wearing at night, in the dark, is a tinted lens. Any positive feedback is purely anecdotal and has never been substantiated in a peer reviewed journal.
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I generally don't have an issue with modern LED headlights....if they are aimed the right way it should not matter how bright they are and every car over three years gets its headlight aim checked at least once a year as part of the MOT...too high and its a fail. I suspect that most folks on here claiming to be blinded by modern LED or HID headlights are in fact being blinded by morons who believe that fitting aftermarket HID and LED bulbs in headlights designed for halogen bulbs is OK.....its not, and the reflectors or projectors cant correctly focus them into a sharp dip beam cutoff and its the light that bleeds over this line that causes the glare. They are all MOT fails now.....but its easy enough to pop the old bulbs back in for the test.......or have a "friendly" tester that turns a blind ;)eye......


A good pattern from the correct bulb in the correct housing with next to no light above the line.... this one has a kickup on both headlights, some its only on the left one and some modern headlights have a straight pattern with no kick up to the left at all..

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LEDs in Halogen housing......note how much light is bleeding over the cutoff line..(the swirls and blobs of light above the cutoff)......that's what dazzles you.

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I generally don't have an issue with modern LED headlights....if they are aimed the right way it should not matter how bright they are and every car over three years gets its headlight aim checked at least once a year as part of the MOT...too high and its a fail. I suspect that most folks on here claiming to be blinded by modern LED or HID headlights are in fact being blinded by morons who believe that fitting aftermarket HID and LED bulbs in headlights designed for halogen bulbs is OK.....its not, and the reflectors or projectors cant correctly focus them into a sharp dip beam cutoff and its the light that bleeds over this line that causes the glare. They are all MOT fails now.....but its easy enough to pop the old bulbs back in for the test.......or have a "friendly" tester that turns a blind ;)eye......


A good pattern from the correct bulb in the correct housing with next to no light above the line.... this one has a kickup on both headlights, some its only on the left one and some modern headlights have a straight pattern with no kick up to the left at all..

View attachment 152906

LEDs in Halogen housing......note how much light is bleeding over the cutoff line..(the swirls and blobs of light above the cutoff)......that's what dazzles you.

View attachment 152903
But with the much higher intensity of light if one of those is approaching me, as it goes round a left hand bend I'm in the high intensity zone.
Then add the car being on an upward incline, or.....
tbh there are a few situations where these lights will scorch the retina, or feel like it.

Some years ago while travelling on an unlit rural road, it being long hill toward Buxton. Leaving Fernilee thre is a road, from a shortcut, that joins the main carriageway, at an acute angle from the left. A little further there is a right hand bend (for me). A car came toward me round the bend, I could see naff all, so I went to high beam. This was just in time to see a light coloured car with it's nose out, for a better view from the shortcut toward me on the main carriageway. Said retina burner was just passing my door, allowing me to lurch to the right to avoid car on my left. flippin' close it was.

Had I creamed said car on the left I would have been held to account.
The only answer to prevent me, and others, from similar situations is for us not to use the roads when dark. Trouble there is as I see that as a fu attitude toward me I feel a likewise response is justified.

We can't reverse the millions of LED equipped cars 'already' on our roads. But to legislate that their beam be angled down a few more degrees would be more than reasonable imho.

Are the legislators all young, with perfect eyesight?
Don't some of them suffer similar and realise this just 'aint all a positive development?
Don't some realise that bright light is only a great advantage, if over head, and high in the sky.
Dusk and dawn are dangerous times for the well sighted also, cos the flippin' light is in the wrong place.
 
There's nothing proven I'm aware of as the issue tends to be internal, so your eyes, not the environment. As has been said lens opacities are the main issue along with uncorrected refractive error. Also a multitude of other ophthalmological issues which an individual may or may not be aware; corneal scars, dystrophies, vitreous floaters, epiretinal membranes etc etc.


Best option is a correct, well dispensed prescription with a good anti reflection coating. By good I mean one that isn't as bright as the sun when you look at them. The whole point is that they are an "anti" reflection coatings so as there will be some reflection from these coatings (but only about 0.8% of incident light not 10% without) you want this to be as little as possible so the coloured reflection on the lens should be as dim as possible. All reputable lens manufacturers make a decent coating; HVLL from Hoya, Crizal Sapphire from Essilor, Seemax Next from Nikon for instance. Some do driving AR coatings, Essilor Drive, Nikon seacoat drive for instance which reflect at a slightly different wavelength. They are fine but I can't say I've had spectacular feedback over and above a more general purpose MAR coating.


Obviously keep them clean and even more obviously actually wear them. Also a clean, unscratched windscreen.


Yellow lenses reduce the incident light to your eye by about 10-20% . They predominantly affect the shortwave length light but this is only apparent where there is a level of background illumination so built up areas at night. When there dark, unlit roads you are driving with said 10-20% loss of illumination which just might be the difference between seeing someone dressed in dark clothing step out in front of you and not.


Both motoring associations (AA) and optical research depts (Schepens in Boston)have done work and none have shown any significant reduction in glare using them and there are clearly disadvantages.


That abstract is interesting, I haven't seen it before. But it doesn't really address what we are talking about and I note it's conclusion is to look at the headlights not the spectacle wearer. The statement "novel polarized glare reducing eyeglasses" is both intriguing and concerning. Glare reducing - glare from where? This is the crux of all of this. Full text


Polarized - for night driving? By it's very definition a fully polarising lens can only be a 50% transmission lens. The legal tint limit for driving at night is 25% so straight away anything novel it has used is illegal anyway. I'll investigate the whole text but it seems they put a polarised filter on the headlights too, but they did use an 89 Merc 300TE for their experiments!


Sadly, currently at least, there is no easy fix or the big companies would be there like a shot. Current offerings from them are limited in their use and effectivity.


I believe there is some work being done to stop the ever increasing brightness of the headlamps but that's not my field.
 
Yellow lenses reduce the incident light to your eye by about 10-20% . They predominantly affect the shortwave length light but this is only apparent where there is a level of background illumination so built up areas at night. When there dark, unlit roads you are driving with said 10-20% loss of illumination which just might be the difference between seeing someone dressed in dark clothing step out in front of you and not.
The yellow ones I use are quite shallow (low lens height) and perched further down my nose I can either look through them or over them - with nothing more than a tilt of my head. This is a continuous process dictated by the prevalence of oncoming traffic.
 
Not sure if this is relevant... but it's something I tripped over on another forum. It's to do with the heat range of LED/HID bulbs and that the cooler ranges can adversely affect vision in wet conditions - sort of flattens and masks features apparently. Can't verify the veracity of the claims but might it be that someone with overly cool LED/HIDs is actually straining to see and thus more susceptible to the glare form others' lights?
 
1970s -80s and early 1990s I use to drive around 35K a year and did not have any problems with lights to at the time.
Speed limits are the same, many are actually lower so why ultra bright lights in a densely populated country?
SUVs and BMW Mini are particularly bad.
I believe there is government enquiry going on about car headlights and about time too.
 
Also a clean, unscratched windscreen.
That's a good point. Mrs S recently had to have the windscreen replaced on her car due to major stone damage. Prior to that , the original screen had a reasonable dusting of 'road rash' type small chips and abrasions.
The difference between the new and old screens when driving at night is quite remarkable; not nearly as much flare from oncoming headlights.
 
Well I am pleased the op had a success with his cateract surgery,this whole question of driving with eyesight that has not been checked for years,shows how full of loop holes the DVLA's system is ,with their pathetic forms which just allow people to say all is good with their health and eyesight without a medical.
I just had a complete check up of my eyes,even down to have stuff put into both eyes that stung badly for about 15 mins and after checking the prescription glasses I have from 4 years ago they said that my eyesight had not changed at all,which was good to know,and yes I could pass the DVLA/Police eyesight test,but like a few people on here I still hate those high powered headlights at night,but I still use what I was told years ago and that was look away from them,it seems to work.
My night driving now is nowhere near what I did years ago,now in winter it might be twice a week in summer maybe once,but even that short exposure to driving at night I still see drivers who are braking going into gentle bends,because they cannot see,I think this just as bad as being drunk or drugged behind the wheel,so I can only hope the DVLA will soon make medicals to renew your licence at 70,as for younger drivers,I suppose the DVLA will have to come up with a plan to make it that every say 10 years they have to have a eyesight test for their licence to continue.
 
There is no reason why headlights have to be so white/blue apart from the manufacturers trying to make their cars more "modern"
But white- blue is known to be the most distracting and painful light bandwidth when a softer yellow light puts out equally as much lighting but is far less distracting and painful to drivers.

I find it hugely distracting and dangerous as do most people I speak with, young and old.. There is a petition been drawn up for this to be discussed in parliament with an aim to legislate for safe car lighting systems.


 
There is no reason why headlights have to be so white/blue apart from the manufacturers trying to make their cars more "modern"
But white- blue is known to be the most distracting and painful light bandwidth when a softer yellow light puts out equally as much lighting but is far less distracting and painful to drivers.

I don't have Xenons on my current car - and I thought I'd really miss them with night driving. I don't.

My view now is that Xenons and LEDs are often too bright. The only reason I ever feel I'd like to have them is because of the effects of oncoming vehicles with Xenons.

As regards night driving glasses - I can recall back in the 1970s they used to be 'a thing' and there would be adverts. I think they were debunked by the mid 1980s.
 
My night driving now is nowhere near what I did years ago,now in winter it might be twice a week in summer maybe once,but even that short exposure to driving at night I still see drivers who are braking going into gentle bends,because they cannot see,
I see that in broad daylight. Less about vision, more about those who use the brake pedal as a sookie cloot.
 
I’ve found the yellow night driving glasses sold on Amazon are like a gentle tonic bath to tired eyes. Worth a punt at £6 if your eyes don’t react well to the latest million candle power LED thing coming the other way.
I would never buy anything like this from Amazon they have no quality control in process at all.

Proper safety specs have to have a higher ocular specification than your prescription specs.

Buy from a specific safety company ideally... like mine :)

 
I would never buy anything like this from Amazon they have no quality control in process at all.
That's pretty nonsense..and much like saying Sainsburys have no quality control....Amazon don't make anything.........they are just like eBay or your local shop.....just an agent selling products made by others. Like most shops....they have good and bad products......just need to do your research.
 

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