Night driving glasses?

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I would never buy anything like this from Amazon they have no quality control in process at all.

Proper safety specs have to have a higher ocular specification than your prescription specs.

Buy from a specific safety company ideally... like mine :)

Bargain!
 
That's pretty nonsense..and much like saying Sainsburys have no quality control....Amazon don't make anything.........they are just like eBay or your local shop.....just an agent selling products made by others. Like most shops....they have good and bad products......just need to do your research.
Sainsburys etc do have quality control they monitor their producers vigorously, as do all supermarkets AMAZON don't!

I personally have bought a product from AMAZON which was counterfeit and had it confirmed by the manufacturer, but then I could have told them that the moment I received it.

They sell "safety footwear" that doesn't conform to EN20345 people by it and think they are buying a certified product, it has a toe cap etc but hasn't gone through the rigorous safety testing "proper" safety footwear has.

I've had employees of customers (large international companies) have accidents in them their employers have come to us complaining because we are contracted to supply their footwear only to be told they have bought some crap from Amazona and that's not our fault.

AMAZON are an international company they should have some responsibility for what they sell.

We are a small business we don't manufacture anything but every product we sell has been checked to make sure it complies with the relevant safety standards and is certified as such.

Please don't tell me I'm talking nonsense!
 
I would never buy anything like this from Amazon they have no quality control in process at all.

Proper safety specs have to have a higher ocular specification than your prescription specs.

Buy from a specific safety company ideally... like mine :)

Ok, what do you recommend for a varifocal wearer? I have prescription sunglasses, but they are just that - sun glasses, way too dark for night driving, so disregard those. I don’t feel like shelling out another couple of hundred quid for prescription night driving varifocals when the clip on ones I bought via Amazon make a huge difference.
 
AMAZON are an international company they should have some responsibility for what they sell.
But that's the point.... you are not buying from Amazon.... its their sellers..... and they ARE liable if they sell sub standard products..... and when billions of items sell under their banner you are bound to get a few wronguns..... personally I've never had a issue with an Amazon sourced item.... but have had a few with ebay.....but ebay or PayPal have always quickly refunded me. Anyway.... back on topic!

Edit.... from Amazon....

What is the Amazon Pay A-to-z Guarantee?​

We want you to buy with confidence anytime you purchase products on the Amazon.co.uk website or use Amazon Pay. That is why we guarantee purchases from third party sellers when payment is made via the Amazon.co.uk website or when you use Amazon Pay for qualified purchases on third party websites. The condition of the item you buy and its timely delivery are guaranteed under the Amazon Pay A-to-z Guarantee.
 
Sainsburys etc do have quality control they monitor their producers vigorously, as do all supermarkets AMAZON don't!

I hate Amazon. Nevermind the shit, counterfeit products …. But the whole business model and treating staff as slaves 🤢
 
I personally have bought a product from AMAZON which was counterfeit and had it confirmed by the manufacturer, but then I could have told them that the moment I received it.
Was it sold by and dispatched by Amazon or was it a third party?

Whilst possible, I’d be surprised if Amazon sold the counterfeit item. I’d not be a surprised if another business sold an item using Amazon’s platform.
 
Was it sold by and dispatched by Amazon or was it a third party?

Whilst possible, I’d be surprised if Amazon sold the counterfeit item. I’d not be a surprised if another business sold an item using Amazon’s platform.
No I checked it had come from an Amazon warehouse.
 
But that's the point.... you are not buying from Amazon.... its their sellers..... and they ARE liable if they sell sub standard products..... and when billions of items sell under their banner you are bound to get a few wronguns..... personally I've never had a issue with an Amazon sourced item.... but have had a few with ebay.....but ebay or PayPal have always quickly refunded me. Anyway.... back on topic!

Edit.... from Amazon....

What is the Amazon Pay A-to-z Guarantee?​

We want you to buy with confidence anytime you purchase products on the Amazon.co.uk website or use Amazon Pay. That is why we guarantee purchases from third party sellers when payment is made via the Amazon.co.uk website or when you use Amazon Pay for qualified purchases on third party websites. The condition of the item you buy and its timely delivery are guaranteed under the Amazon Pay A-to-z Guarantee.
I don't agree, you order from a company called AMAZON, who are stocking a product supplied from another source its up to Amazon in my view to ensure what they are stocking is up to standard.

As for the safety footwear issue I mentioned it should be up to Amazon to ensure descriptions aren't misleading, you are placing an order with Amazon no one else.

The A-To Z Guarantee is a bunch of gobbledygook! They cant guarantee it they don't even evaluate the products.
 
Ok, what do you recommend for a varifocal wearer? I have prescription sunglasses, but they are just that - sun glasses, way too dark for night driving, so disregard those. I don’t feel like shelling out another couple of hundred quid for prescription night driving varifocals when the clip on ones I bought via Amazon make a huge difference.
If what you have work for you stick with it, all I'm saying is be wary of what you buy from Amazon, all is not what it appears.
 
No I checked it had come from an Amazon warehouse.
Was the seller Amazon too? The reason I ask is that Amazon provide the logistics for a large number of businesses and individuals, but they’re not actually the seller - they just provide the e-commerce platform, store and deliver it.

Beneath the “Add to basket” and “Buy now” buttons on the Amazon app and website you’ll see who the seller is, and who dispatches it (ie who does the logistics) - see below for examples.

This means you bought it from Amazon:

1707733179364.jpeg

This means you bought it from another business (not Amazon) but they used Amazon’s e-commerce platform and logistics service:

1707733263609.jpeg

This means that you bought it from another business (not Amazon), but they used the Amazon e-commerce platform only (and didn’t use Amazon for logistics:

1707733335672.jpeg
 
Can't remember to be fair it was a while ago now, I was in correspondence with Amazon about it for a while and they conceded they had shipped the product from their own warehouse and were very concerned about the issue, especially as I had the correspondence form the manufacturer confirming the product they had sold was counterfeit.
My issue is, if they are promoting products they should have some control over what they are promoting whether it comes form their warehouse or not.
Its ok to say buyer should be aware but not all buyers are a savvy as others.
It all boils down to responsibility as far as I'm concerned, they are happy to make billions but cant be ****d to make sure what they are promoting is legit or even safe in some instances.

Found it; it was longer ago than I thought, looks like it was sold by Amazon.
But as I say, as far as I'm concerned that shouldn't make any difference I placed an order with Amazon.
 

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So, as far as I understand from people's posts here, the yellow/amber glasses don't do any good for night driving. Right? Is that a safe summary/assumption?
 
Also, I would like to say that, regarding normal sunglasses, using them in direct sunlight, they practically don't do anything! When Polaroid created the first polarized glasses (And then, everyone else copied them of course), the intention was to absorb the energy of one of the two coefficients of the light wave. That is the horizontal one. The horizontal coefficient is the one that has the most energy when you get sun light after it's reflected on surfaces. So, your polarized glasses are designed to work against reflected light; not direct light!
Having said that, you might find it easier to look directly at the sun because the same sunglasses are tinted at a level of darkness of your choice, regardless of the polarization.
I hope people find this physics fact useful :)
 
I acquired eye wear from an outlet store in Portsmouth ( Oakley ) and the manager made it very clear to me that the eyewear was not for night driving.The plastic lens had a very slight yellow tint / similar to the type of eye protection that professional cricketers use / used.

I would suspect that with the rise of SUVs has not helped dazzling oncoming drivers due to increased headlights height.
 
I acquired eye wear from an outlet store in Portsmouth ( Oakley ) and the manager made it very clear to me that the eyewear was not for night driving.The plastic lens had a very slight yellow tint / similar to the type of eye protection that professional cricketers use / used.

I would suspect that with the rise of SUVs has not helped dazzling oncoming drivers due to increased headlights height.
Increased headlights height of a car should only make a difference if you are right in front of it and its height makes the difference. Otherwise, the emitted light should illuminate up to a very specific range, measured by those mirror things they have in garages when they test the headlights during MOT. So, even a truck should illuminate that specific range instead of 'leaking' light to the rest of the world.
The problem with dazzling headlights is not the rise of SUVs in my opinion... is the lack of proper MOT checks on headlights.
 
Increased headlights height of a car should only make a difference if you are right in front of it and its height makes the difference. Otherwise, the emitted light should illuminate up to a very specific range, measured by those mirror things they have in garages when they test the headlights during MOT. So, even a truck should illuminate that specific range instead of 'leaking' light to the rest of the world.
The problem with dazzling headlights is not the rise of SUVs in my opinion... is the lack of proper MOT checks on headlights.
Not necessarily shoddy MOT checks, as it’s newer cars that seem to be worst.
 
Not necessarily shoddy MOT checks, as it’s newer cars that seem to be worst.
Mot checks are only effective during the test, as soon as it has passed the owner simply swaps bulbs/headlight units and run for another year.
I wish there was a solution because I have noticed an increase of occasions where I am being dazzled on rural roads(normally accompanied by the deafening roar of the boy racer exhaust, blow off valve whistle
and popcorn after burn).
 
Increased headlights height of a car should only make a difference if you are right in front of it and its height makes the difference. Otherwise, the emitted light should illuminate up to a very specific range, measured by those mirror things they have in garages when they test the headlights during MOT. So, even a truck should illuminate that specific range instead of 'leaking' light to the rest of the world.
The problem with dazzling headlights is not the rise of SUVs in my opinion... is the lack of proper MOT checks on headlights.
Well the problem of headlight dazzling is on the increase and more SUVs are on the road. Consequence or not but the problem is increasing day on day.
 
Well the problem of headlight dazzling is on the increase and more SUVs are on the road. Consequence or not but the problem is increasing day on day.
Or night on night...... 😇
 

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