Police to be balloted on right to strike

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There was a pit closure program planned before the strike - that's what cost miners their jobs. The Government and the NCB told blatent lies when they denied that such a program existed and assured miners who carried on working that their jobs were safe and that such stories were nonsense.

We all know what happened afterwards.

Strike or no strike, the Government planned to close down the Uk coal industry - mainly to make the electricity genertating companies more attractive when they privatised them.

You may be right, Arthur Scargill however did nothing to make the process more remote.
Privatisation of all the national utilities was a mistake but like now the country was effectively broke and the sale of assets helped, but seeing how they've flourished since denationalisation makes one wonder how they could have contribute if managed properly by the government.
 
Expected the UK tax payer or consumer to subsidise his members indefinitely.

The UK tax payer is funding them to this day. It costs a lot of money to keep whole communties on benefits for a quarter of a century once you've destroyed their livlihoods.
 
The UK tax payer is funding them to this day. It costs a lot of money to keep whole communties on benefits for a quarter of a century once you've destroyed their livlihoods.

Rubbish.
more people than ever before have been allowed to claim benefits they didn't used to be entitled to, yet we have had some years of the lowest number of claimants.
Add to that that these areas got grants for redevelopment, they are now very busy economically.

Of course, some people never wanted to work and use that as a convenient excuse.

http://www.parliament.uk/documents/...y_issues/Key Issues Unemployment hotspots.pdf
 
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Rubbish.
more people than ever before have been allowed to claim benefits they didn't used to be entitled to, yet we have had some years of the lowest number of claimants.
Add to that that these areas got grants for redevelopment, they are now very busy economically.

Of course, some people never wanted to work and use that as a convenient excuse.

So all former mining towns are now very busy economically ? Rubbish.

Many miners never worked again after the pits closed and levels of drug abuse are high in many of these communities as are all the other social problems associated with long-term unemployment and deprivation.

Many of these areas were ignored and left to rot for 20 years after the strike and whilst recent years have seen attempts at expensive, tax-payer funded regeneration they haven't always been successful. Take a trip to Ollerton and see how many units remain empty in the Energy Village - and that is trumpeted as one of the success stories.
 
Nothing like some facts to spoil a good rant.

Exclusive - Ollerton's Sherwood Energy Village goes into liquidation | Newark Advertiser

For those that can't read the whole article.

Thirteen tenants have moved in bringing 1,500 jobs – five hundred more than were lost when the pit closed.

Tell us something we don't know. After years of stagnation a combination of grants and subsidies paid for by the taxpayer created the village. Further incentives were used to entice businesses in to it and whilst the figures look good on paper much of the capacity remains vacant after 3 years.

And as I have already said, this is trumpeted as one of the success stories and ignores the countless other former pit communities that haven't received such breaks from the taxpayer.

It's a shame that the energy companies who've made a killing out of us all since privatisation don't help to regenerate those communtites still waiting for similar big investment projects.
 
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Further incentives were used to entice businesses in to it and whilst the figures look good on paper much of the capacity remains vacant after 3 years.

Which of course is directly opposite of what has happened in the rest of the Country. :rolleyes:

Did nobody tell you, We've been in recession, lots of commercial buildings have been vacant...
 
Which of course is directly opposite of what has happened in the rest of the Country. :rolleyes:

Did nobody tell you, We've been in recession, lots of commercial buildings have been vacant...

Though most of these buildings would not have been funded by the taxpayer.

It is also interesting to note behind all of the figures that 3 whole buildings at this site are occupied by the County Council who have simply moved there from elsewhere.

But let's not spoil a good news story by worrying about a few inconvenient figures.
 
The decision to violently destroy every last ounce out of these communities for ideological reasons is what sticks in the throat.

The decision was to deal with the industry. The communities were collateral damage - there was no intent to violently destroy them or any other ideology.

The problem was the coal industry.

The supposed cost of subsidising the industry is a much used line trotted out by those that would have you believe that 'there was no other choice', when if you studied the figures you will see that the redundancy payments to miners alone cost £8bn.

If the redundancy payments cost £8 billion then it is perhaps a sign of either how generous the terms were or how uneconomic the industry was.

I've seen a lot of emotion and a lot of odd numbers presented over the years. There's a tendency to dramatically round up or down by the advocates on both sides.

I have sympathy for the miners but no sympathy for the strike and I despise the leadership who I think manipulated and misled their members for a variety of motives.
 
So all former mining towns are now very busy economically ? Rubbish.

Many miners never worked again after the pits closed and levels of drug abuse are high in many of these communities as are all the other social problems associated with long-term unemployment and deprivation.

Many of these areas were ignored and left to rot for 20 years after the strike and whilst recent years have seen attempts at expensive, tax-payer funded regeneration they haven't always been successful. Take a trip to Ollerton and see how many units remain empty in the Energy Village - and that is trumpeted as one of the success stories.

Have the people in these areas ruled out moving somewhere else? I mean, if it was an oil town & the oil ran out you would really expect everyone to stick around & suck on the State teat for the next generation or two would you?
 
Surely it's harder not to move when you're skint, unless you like being skint & the prospect of spending the next 5, 10 or 20 years skint appeals.

This country is full of enterprising immigrants who have moved here from different countries or even different continents with no English, no family, no friends. Some have prospered, some survived, some went home. At least they had the gumption to get off their ****s & make a bloody effort instead of moaning for the next 30 years about Thatcher!
 
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How do you move your family and possessions with no money?
 
This country is full of enterprising immigrants who have moved here from different countries or even different continents with no English, no family, no friends. Some have prospered, some survived, some went home. At least they had the gumption to get off their ****s & make a bloody effort instead of moaning for the next 30 years about Thatcher!


the blue brigade don't like those guys either
 
................ Police to strike , well i think that was at the start of this thread.If they do strike that will be the time to take the SL for a little road trip ;)
 
Surely it's harder not to move when you're skint, unless you like being skint & the prospect of spending the next 5, 10 or 20 years skint appeals.

Where did you suppose they move to?
 
The decision was to deal with the industry. The communities were collateral damage - there was no intent to violently destroy them or any other ideology.

The problem was the coal industry

I have sympathy for the miners but no sympathy for the strike and I despise the leadership who I think manipulated and misled their members for a variety of motives.

Of course it was ideological, the woman called miners 'the enemy within' for goodness sake!

Do you know any former miners? If you do, they will very likely tell you how Scargill actually tried to cool the talk of a strike, he was seen by many as a moderator for the miners.
 

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