Recent purchase thread

Londonscottish

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One of those jobs on my Round Toit list. What did you use to seal the blocks?

I used the Wickes sealer. I did the edging bricks by hand with a brush then used a Wickes telescopic-pole-roller and bucket for the majority. You don't need to, but I've given it two coats to get a deeper sheen and more protection. Once the joints are done I think it'll look great. And, more importantly stay that way longer. Yesterday evening I could see the rain beading on it.

Part of it is quite shaded so was going a bit green. I've washed my cars on it a lot so all the black water from the wheels would have been settling on it, etc etc.

Now it should be easy to keep in looking good with a quick blast with the pressure washer.

Be careful what you buy - some of them are water based and/or a bit rubbish. This one came with good reviews and really worked for me.



wickes sealer.jpg
 

ChrisHGTV

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That is a harmonic damper and its purpose is to damp torsional vibrations present in the crankshaft that would if left undamped eventually break the crankshaft.
Yes I was reading that the rubber part gives the effect of a larger mass? But in absence of any replacements with the rubber part available I hope this solid version doesn’t cause a catastrophic failure of some sort!
 

Bellow

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Yes I was reading that the rubber part gives the effect of a larger mass? But in absence of any replacements with the rubber part available I hope this solid version doesn’t cause a catastrophic failure of some sort!
First, I'd be grilling the supplier for assurance that it will not cause a crank failure and a commitment in writing to make good any damage caused. When that isn't forthcoming, return it and pursue other options.

Maybe a V6 is less troubled (then why did Alfa fit a damper?) but on straight sixes and V8s the damper is vital to prevent crank breakage.
You are very possibly compounding the situation by eliminating the dual-mass flywheel. Is the supplier of the crank pulley aware of this intention?
 

ChrisHGTV

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First, I'd be grilling the supplier for assurance that it will not cause a crank failure and a commitment in writing to make good any damage caused. When that isn't forthcoming, return it and pursue other options.

Maybe a V6 is less troubled (then why did Alfa fit a damper?) but on straight sixes and V8s the damper is vital to prevent crank breakage.
You are very possibly compounding the situation by eliminating the dual-mass flywheel. Is the supplier of the crank pulley aware of this intention?
Yes it's a tricky one - the main problem is there are no original spec pulleys available anywhere, even used. They are like hen's teeth! And though my existing one is holding together, it could fail at any point. A couple of companies have started making these solid ones - there is basically one available for the 3 litre (mine) and one for the 3.2 GTA (available from two companies though i'm sure there is only one manufacturer). I've asked AHM Motorsport about theirs (for the 3.2) and the implications of ditching the DMF for their solid flywheel. They very much know their stuff, my main concern is they specialise in race engines so longevity might not be their primary concern! It's interesting that earlier Alfa V6's and later V6's didn't use a DMF - i think it was more an "en vogue" thing in the late 90's. Ultimately i guess the choice is use the existing damper and hope it doesn't fail, use the solid one and hope it doesn't cause a failure, or leave it on the drive! I'll see what AHM say....
 

Bellow

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Yes it's a tricky one - the main problem is there are no original spec pulleys available anywhere, even used. They are like hen's teeth! And though my existing one is holding together, it could fail at any point. A couple of companies have started making these solid ones - there is basically one available for the 3 litre (mine) and one for the 3.2 GTA (available from two companies though i'm sure there is only one manufacturer). I've asked AHM Motorsport about theirs (for the 3.2) and the implications of ditching the DMF for their solid flywheel. They very much know their stuff, my main concern is they specialise in race engines so longevity might not be their primary concern! It's interesting that earlier Alfa V6's and later V6's didn't use a DMF - i think it was more an "en vogue" thing in the late 90's. Ultimately i guess the choice is use the existing damper and hope it doesn't fail, use the solid one and hope it doesn't cause a failure, or leave it on the drive! I'll see what AHM say....
The DMF is a separate issue and relates more to transmission - though in concert with elimination of the front damper - I wouldn't want to go there.
Ask AHM Motorsport by what calculation eliminating the front damper is deemed acceptable. Mere hope that it will be OK is not an answer. The actual calculation is a hugely complex one and very probably beyond their capabilities.

Better I think to stick with the existing pulley with the damper (while continuing to search for new-old stock - they will be out there and when you find them - buy all of them!). There are a couple of safeguards you can initiate. Firstly, when they start to fail the outer hub starts to slip on the inner. Often, there are ignition timing marks on the outer. Check periodically with a strobe light that the marks are in the correct place. If no marks, scribe marks on the inner and outer and keep an eye on them. Tippex makes them much easier seen.

To counter the possibility of the outer parting company consider discs bolted to either side of the inner hub that overlap the outer where the rubber is such that if the outer tries to shift it cannot move axially. You'll likely have to have them machined and they must not interfere with the outer pulley. Alternatively, overlapping large washers bolted to the hub. Watch for balance with either set up (and use Loctite on the bolts) - especially the latter. That would safeguard against the worst type of failure only leaving you stranded without serp belt drive to auxiliaries.
Marking it and monitoring is probably safe enough for now at least (unless you intend doing long cross continental journeys in search of a pulley). They do slip before they part company.
 

knighterrant

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I used the Wickes sealer. I did the edging bricks by hand with a brush then used a Wickes telescopic-pole-roller and bucket for the majority. You don't need to, but I've given it two coats to get a deeper sheen and more protection. Once the joints are done I think it'll look great. And, more importantly stay that way longer. Yesterday evening I could see the rain beading on it.

Part of it is quite shaded so was going a bit green. I've washed my cars on it a lot so all the black water from the wheels would have been settling on it, etc etc.

Now it should be easy to keep in looking good with a quick blast with the pressure washer.

Be careful what you buy - some of them are water based and/or a bit rubbish. This one came with good reviews and really worked for me.



View attachment 112572
Thanks. I'm running out of excuses now.

I just had a look on Amazon and saw that Silka also do a patio seal. Have a look at their wonderful deals if you buy 2 or better still 3 cans! :eek::rolleyes:

Screenshot 2021-05-04 at 14.57.16.png
 

Bobby Dazzler

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I used to do alot of paving for many year's and always used resiblock sealant abit more expensive but very durable (always resand before sealing) and always 2 coats in my experience 👍
How long does it last, and how does it age? Does it leave inconsistencies across the paved area?
 

Spider10

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We used to do it yearly, the 1st coat you apply will seem like its using alot which it will as concrete blocks act like a sponge, there won't be any inconsistencies the more coats over time will take less.
Once you have used it you will wounder why you haven't before just be aware on new paving let the salt come out of the blocks before sealng (ie the white stuff)
Allways sand 1st,a roller is the best way to do it
1 more thing the moss, weeds etc don't come from the bottom, they come from muck,seeds etc in the joints
 

Happytalk73

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A Rotary Laser Level kit for site work.

 
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