Resizing digital pictures

Discussion in 'OT (OFF Topic) Forums' started by EDZ649, Jun 28, 2011.

  1. EDZ649

    EDZ649 MB Enthusiast

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    Can anyone help me with resizing some high resolution pictures (5mb each) so that they are small enough to upload to pistonheads i.e. 500kb but still keeping a good resolution?

    Thanks.
     
  2. grober

    grober MB Master

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  3. verytalldave

    verytalldave MB Enthusiast

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    Can easily be done with the free windows package that comes pre-loaded with windows.
    Open the image with your preloaded copy of MICROSOFT PHOTO EDITOR.
    Select the IMAGE icon from the task bar.
    Select the RESIZE option from the drop-down menu
    Shrink (or increase) the image to your required size.
    Save the resized image as a new file-name to avoid writing over the existing file.

    Simple.
     
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  4. renault12ts

    renault12ts MB Club Veteran

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    1 person likes this.
  5. OP
    OP
    EDZ649

    EDZ649 MB Enthusiast

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    I have tried this method on photobucket but the problem is whe it asks what size you want it doesn't give you the kb size.

    I have now managed to upload the full size pictures one at a time, albeit it took ages!

    Thank all.
     
  6. Palfrem

    Palfrem MB Enthusiast

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  7. silver_star

    silver_star Active Member

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    ^^ What he said!
     
  8. oldcro

    oldcro MB Enthusiast

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    Or E-mail the photos to yourself, the E-mail programme should give size options.
     
  9. The G.F.P

    The G.F.P MB Enthusiast

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    load it with windows paint

    image

    pick "resize/skew"

    then try 50 in each box

    then save as

    use another name to call it & save to desktop

    goto desktop, right button, properties and see the size
     
  10. Cabe

    Cabe Active Member

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  11. jepho

    jepho Active Member

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    Resolution is related to pixels per inch (cm if you use metric) and referred to as ppi. It has relevance to an image in two respects: 1. if you want to know if an image can be printed at a certain size. 2. If you want to reduce the image file size without losing too much detail from the image.

    The pixel is the smallest useful part of an image and it is this unit which is manipulated by colour changes and sharpening. Taking the example of printing an image, it is generally thought that 300 pixels per inch is an ideal resolution. It is supposed to be the resolution at which the eye cannot detect individual pixels at normal viewing distances.

    If you have an image that you want to print at say... 8 x 10 inches. Your image must contain at least 2400 pixels by 3000 pixels. Multiplying the inches of the length and then the height by the 300 pixels per inch required for printing and you have arrived at the minimum resolution (in pixels) that your image must contain.

    Screen sized images are different in that the pixel count can be anything you determine and the image will stay the same size but will lose resolution as the pixel count drops. A good general rule is to drop the pixel count to 72 ppi which will enable you to use smaller file sizes. Where you are saving for web display, you can go ahead an use jpeg images saved at a medium quality of around 8 where you do not want any transparent areas in your image.

    jpeg files are all 8bit (with the exception of jpeg 2000 files which are not widely used) and they do not support transparency. (where you can see the background of an object which is behind the image) To support transparency for 8bit image files, you should use something like portable network graphic file format (png).

    The example image below was sized to 300ppi to print at 10 x 8 inches and it contained enough pixels 3000 x 2400 to be 43.3 Megabytes in size. To display it on a web page it was sized to 72ppi. It now measures 720 x 576 pixels and when saved as a jpeg image (at quality of 8) it is now only 106.9 kilobytes in size.

    If I reduce the pixel count again, the image becomes smaller in pixel count but unrecognisable. At 40ppi it is now only 62kb in size. if you download it and look at it at twice the size, you will notice the heavy pixellation. Any image editing software should let you resize your image according to your needs.
     

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