Smart Meter

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I don't have a smart meter, and I don't want one. There have been too many issues for my liking with inaccurate bills, etc... and I see little value in knowing what it costs to watch TV, as it isn't going to change anything.
 
We've had smart meters for some years, in two houses. As already mentioned this should cost you nothing - both for the original installation and any other work that's required over the years. We are with OVO currently and have had both smart meters and the in-house display (IHD) unit replaced this year for free.

Obviously meter readings are picked up automatically, which is more convenient than having to send them in yourself or having someone come round to read them. But you can also choose the frequency with which data is sent, from monthly down to half-hourly. If you select the latter you can see a detailed breakdown of your energy use during the day, which can potentially be interesting/useful. E.g. for us yesterday:

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(we have solar panels so daytime electricity usage is very low).

The IHD mentioned above connects wirelessly to the meters and shows energy usage and cost in real time (and historically, if you want). If you're not interested you can put it back in the box and stick it in a drawer :D

The downside is that as with any technology there's more to go wrong than with old/dumb meters. Our gas and electricity meters are on opposite sides of the house - the gas meter communicates with the electricity meter, and that sends the data to your energy supplier (and the IHD). We had intermittent issues with the gas meter losing connection, which meant no readings were going through for that. Eventually they replaced both meters - overkill, but as mentioned it didn't cost us anything. We've had problems with the IHD since then - initially the tariff rates on it were wrong, and when they sent down an update to fix that it lost connection and stopped working completely. They've had a few goes at fixing that remotely - last try is today, after which they'll send us another new one if necessary (free again).

Ultimately though if any of the 'smart' stuff fails the worst that can happen is that you have to read the meter(s) manually and submit readings as before - not really a big deal. We were doing that on the gas meter for a while, till the replacement one was fitted.
 
Just for clarity please..:
When you say the readings "falsely showed that there was no gas use" & that they assured you that it was reporting the use to them.
Was there no use being shown on the IHD, or was there nothing being registered on the meter's own register.?
There was no indication on the IHD that gas was being used (with boiler on or cooking on the hob). Selecting 'meter reading' on the IHD menu, the reading was the same as the reading displayed on the meter, which never changed week on week. The electricity side of the IHD continued to display and record consumption as normal.
 
I’m reading two concerns.

The smart bits might break, and cost me money to replace. If the smart bit breaks then you just submit readings manually, and even then are no worse off than having a traditional meter. Members report that they’ve been replaced FOC.

The supplier might cut me off if I persistently don’t pay the bill. They’d actually get a court order to replace it with a smart PAYG meter and even then it would only be if you ignored their letters and made no attempt to pay.
 
Our gas meter is a smart meter (the old one developed a leak, and was replaced FOC with a smart meter by the supplier). Our electricity meter is still the old one, as we had no particular reason to initiate its replacement, which means that the new smart gas meter can't really send any data back to the network and we're still reading both meters manually.

I am neither in favour not against smart meters.... I am not too interested in seeing my consumption statistics, and I'm OK with submitting a manual reading once a month, but at the same time, when the electricity meter next needs replacing it will be replaced with a smart meter.

As for reliability, I am aware that there's a potential for issues with new tech, but that's true for many other areas of life and I'm not the type that hangs on to their Nokia phones because the battery lasts a whole week (no offense meant to those who do, it's just that I am not one of them), and at the same time I don't queue all night outside the Apple shop every year in October - instead, when the new tech comes my way, I accept it.
 
Our gas meter is a smart meter (the old one developed a leak, and was replaced FOC with a smart meter by the supplier). Our electricity meter is still the old one, as we had no particular reason to initiate its replacement, which means that the new smart gas meter can't really send any data back to the network and we're still reading both meters manually.
That doesn't make any sense?
Why would a smart meter for gas need a smart meter for electricity before it could pass on any readings? They have to work independantly or if you had different gas and electric suppliers you would be sending your usage readings to a company who you were not even a customer of.
 
One big potential fun item of smart meters that is seldom mentioned is that if suppliers wish to invoke different prices for high and low demand times, with a smart meter they can, but with an ordinary meter they can't. We all make breakfast around 7-10am and dinner 6-8pm, so what would you do if your supplier decided to up the tariff between those times??
 
I’m not at home at the moment so I can’t check but I’m sure our gas smart meter ‘sender’ has a battery so that it can send readings irrespective of the electric smart meter.
I’m sure there were complaints in the Press a while back that only the supply company can change the battery and it would be part of some sort of regular maintenance (perhaps that only applies if you only have a gas smart meter).
 
That doesn't make any sense?
Why would a smart meter for gas need a smart meter for electricity before it could pass on any readings? They have to work independantly or if you had different gas and electric suppliers you would be sending your usage readings to a company who you were not even a customer of.
i forget which way round it is, but one of our meters sends it’s readings via the other, or so the engineer told me.
 
i forget which way round it is, but one of our meters sends it’s readings via the other, or so the engineer told me.
The electricity meter has the responsibility for transmission of data to the network, the gas meter sends its info to the electricity meter for onward transmission.
 
That doesn't make any sense?
Why would a smart meter for gas need a smart meter for electricity before it could pass on any readings? They have to work independantly or if you had different gas and electric suppliers you would be sending your usage readings to a company who you were not even a customer of.

This:

The electricity meter has the responsibility for transmission of data to the network, the gas meter sends its info to the electricity meter for onward transmission.
 
One big potential fun item of smart meters that is seldom mentioned is that if suppliers wish to invoke different prices for high and low demand times, with a smart meter they can, but with an ordinary meter they can't. We all make breakfast around 7-10am and dinner 6-8pm, so what would you do if your supplier decided to up the tariff between those times??

I would imagine that the heavy electrical consumers are washing machines, tumble driers, vacuum cleaners, kitchen ovens, and also electrical heaters for those who have them. The kettle and the toaster will probably only be used briefly. With regards gas, it's probably the bolier that's the heavy consumer, less so the hob when frying eggs (and some kitchens will have induction hobs). Also, what's stopping the supplier from upping the tariff between certain hours as things stand? I don't think the meter is an issue.
 
Also, what's stopping the supplier from upping the tariff between certain hours as things stand? I don't think the meter is an issue.

They have no way of determining billing for tariffs with just one traditional meter.

A long while back we used to have separate night time electricity tariffs - so called 'white meter' or 'economy 7' where there was a separate meter that counted consumed units during the hours of the lower tariff.

A smart meter that records consumption and time of consumption does allow more complex charging.
 
A smart meter that records consumption and time of consumption does allow more complex charging.
Which is a massive benefit as you can load shift high usage appliances to off-peak.

I pay 7.5p/kWH for 6 hours a day, and 38p for the rest… 👌

Great for charging ⚡️ the 🚙 and scheduling the washer dryer, dishwasher etc…

Not to mention once our home battery setup is implemented all usage will effectively be off-peak…
 
Which is a massive benefit as you can load shift high usage appliances to off-peak.

Back in the old days of big coal and nuclear stations then it made sense to have cheaper night tariffs because you basically wanted to send the baseload power somewhere.

These days it's more complicated. With a substantial increase in EVs it may well be possible that domestic night tariffs become more expensive than day tariffs.

Or we could see a system of declared tariffs based on weather forecasts.

Or we could have a complex situation where we have houses with solar cells and domestic high capacity batteries and/or EVs that are used as domestic battery storage to smooth the pricing. It might get to the point where the property market gets upset by a situation where new builds are significantly better than older housing stick. It possibly becomes logical to offer 'house scrappage' schemes where owners are encouraged to scrap their existing house to replace it with something more energy efficient with in built energy management.
 
The electricity meter has the responsibility for transmission of data to the network, the gas meter sends its info to the electricity meter for onward transmission.
That's just bollocks, plenty of gas smart meters are installed and working where there are no electric smart meters installed. Gas networks and electric networks are totally independent of each other and they do not send details of meter readings to each other.
 
That's just bollocks, plenty of gas smart meters are installed and working where there are no electric smart meters installed. Gas networks and electric networks are totally independent of each other and they do not send details of meter readings to each other.
+1
 
Back in the old days of big coal and nuclear stations then it made sense to have cheaper night tariffs because you basically wanted to send the baseload power somewhere.

These days it's more complicated. With a substantial increase in EVs it may well be possible that domestic night tariffs become more expensive than day tariffs.

Or we could see a system of declared tariffs based on weather forecasts.

Or we could have a complex situation where we have houses with solar cells and domestic high capacity batteries and/or EVs that are used as domestic battery storage to smooth the pricing. It might get to the point where the property market gets upset by a situation where new builds are significantly better than older housing stick. It possibly becomes logical to offer 'house scrappage' schemes where owners are encouraged to scrap their existing house to replace it with something more energy efficient with in built energy management.
If this became the norm then I’m sure the electric board/suppliers would find a way to ‘force’ all households to upgrade.
 
That's just bollocks, plenty of gas smart meters are installed and working where there are no electric smart meters installed. Gas networks and electric networks are totally independent of each other and they do not send details of meter readings to each other.

This is how it works for us - the gas meter is a smart meter but it cannot send data back to the network. We need to also replace the electricity meter to a smart meter if we want the meters to send data. Also, the gas and electricity meters are in different locations, and it has been explained to us that due to the distance this may or may not work.

If you're asking what happens when the gas and electricity are supplied by different suppliers, then the answer is that I don't know. I am guessing that either the electricity supplier transfers the relevant usage data to the gas supplier, or perhaps in these circumstances the gas reading remains manual even if the meter is a smart meter (as is currently the case for us, not having a smart electricity meter). Or, perhaps there are several types of smart meters on the market - I don't know.
 

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