Smart Meter

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I’m surprised that OVO would initiate the switch without your consent. If leaves the door open for people to switch other people’s electricity/gas supply, for example those with a grudge or dispute, or those people who go door to door asking you to switch.
Exactly, Rob. I explained the situation to them after the first bill, which was about £39 for five days (they don't even have my name!), and I've received a reminder since, so this could be fun. The agency is part of a national group, Countrywide, who have an arrangement with Ovo to refer new tenants to their supply, to assist with a smooth handover (ie obtain commission). They were totally out of order instructing Ovo, who were just as out of oder for accepting their instruction.

As I said, without smart meters, someone would have physically had to come to the property to provide final readings.
 
By reducing the pilot flame size I've cut that to 1.2 KWh per day saving over £100 per year.

Interesting, I wonder if that's possible on the Rayburn - I'll have to do a little research! As an aside the fridge in my old 2004 caravan didn't have a pilot light - it used the electronic ignition to fire up the burner when the thermostat tripped. Our newer 2020 one has a pilot light that runs the whole time - not exactly progress! I've noticed that we do get through gas a fair bit quicker, but it's a much bigger fridge so more likely down to that.

Our electricity consumption at home does go down to zero a lot of the time during daylight hours due to the solar panels (I actually need to get the ladders out and give them their annual clean as I've noticed the peak output is down a little). Overnight it drops to 0.04 - 0.10 kWh per hour as the fridge & chest freezer cycle, plus some phones on charge etc. We used 2.01 kWh in total yesterday:

1684143603482.png

While we were away last weekend the total usage was around 0.9 kWh per day (including some timer lights on in the evenings):

1684144394309.png
 
...As I said, without smart meters, someone would have physically had to come to the property to provide final readings.

True, though not in all cases.

Firstly, I live in a block of flats in Central London, the meters in these buildings are always located in one of communal areas (and not in each individual flat i.e. not in the Leaseholder's demise), the chaps who read the meters arrange access with the building's managing agents and without the tennants or leaseholders even knowing about it.

Then, even where the meters are physically inside the house, when the owner appoints a letting agent, they will often hand them a set of keys to allow them to arrange viewing with prospective tenants, and so they could arrange access for meter reading without the owner's knowledge.

So yes, in your particular case, not having smart meters would have protected you from unnecessary headache, but it won't make a difference in the majority of cases, and to my mind this is not a valid reason for avoiding smart meters in all circumstances.
 
Exactly, Rob. I explained the situation to them after the first bill, which was about £39 for five days (they don't even have my name!), and I've received a reminder since, so this could be fun. The agency is part of a national group, Countrywide, who have an arrangement with Ovo to refer new tenants to their supply, to assist with a smooth handover (ie obtain commission). They were totally out of order instructing Ovo, who were just as out of oder for accepting their instruction.

As I said, without smart meters, someone would have physically had to come to the property to provide final readings.
Ironically I have only switched a few times, and the first was to OVO. I can’t remember the switch to OVO or subsequently BG requiring a visit. The most recent example did require a visit because it was to replace meters at my request.
 
Just as an aside ... we were away recently, with the central heating & hot water turned off for 3 full days. Gas hob and Rayburn obviously not being used for cooking, so no gas usage? The smart meter data shows otherwise ... 10 kWh consumed every day (four times our average electricity usage at this time of year):

View attachment 140923

The detailed data from the smart meter shows a steady consumption throughout the day, which I can only assume is down to the two pilot lights in the Rayburn (one for the boiler and one for the oven):

View attachment 140924

So at the current rate of approx 10p per kWh turning off the pilot lights before a 2 week holiday would save around £14 on gas.
Could that be the daily rate for the rip-off charge standing charge?
 
Could that be the daily rate for the rip-off charge standing charge?

I did wonder about that initially but I don't think so ... would be very odd to include that in kWh used!
 
I've switched a few times, but none have ever required a site visit to see if the readings I've provided are accurate. The only time the switch went TU was attempting to go from BG to Scottish Power when, having already transferred the gas, SP realised their system could not handle my single price tariff and Economy 7 (which they wrongly said was Economy 10!!) meter, sorry, have to reverse the transfer. Took 6 months to sort out the mess.
 
I read my own meters and keep a spreadsheet record of readings and consumption.
It is quick, easy and obvious when my consumption pattern changes
I'm with Octopus.
Previously Eon and BG.
All as dual fuel suppliers
All have tried to foist smart meters on to me.
The latest was;
Your electricity meter will go out of calibration at the end of this year, we need to fit a new one and it will be a smart meter as the old style meters are no longer made.

OK, I said, come and fit it.
BUT, I would like written confirmation from you, PRIOR, to your fitting the new meter, that you will replace my fitted kitchen, to it's original condition, at your expense.
I sent photos
It went very quiet.
Suddenly, fitting a smart meter was no longer a priority.

The new generation of smart meters will allow suppliers to regulate the usage of each home.
This to allow, for example, reduction in voltage during periods of high demand.
This, we are told, to prevent blackouts.
But, it will also allow the powers that be to blackout an area large or small, for any given period of time, should the power that is, deem it necessary.

We have heard on this forum of a meter recording zero usage, when fuel was, in fact, being used.
Therefore, the opposite could also happen; spurious over reading of usage.
What then?
Will they demand payment?
Will they do the sensible thing and go back through recent usage to get a rational idea of what is right?
What if the over reading ISN'T an over reading but a large short term real increase in usage that the customer claims is spurious?

Our ever increasing reliance on 'tech', to replace people, can only cost us, in both stress and cash.

Why complicate something that works?
 
Ironically I have only switched a few times, and the first was to OVO. I can’t remember the switch to OVO or subsequently BG requiring a visit. The most recent example did require a visit because it was to replace meters at my request.
Not a requirement on thier part, Rob, but without a smart meter, someone needs access to obtain the final meter reading. As @markjay says, anyone with a key can do it, but it's too easy to sit in an office and intruct remotely when you don't have to do this.
 
I read my own meters and keep a spreadsheet record of readings and consumption.
It is quick, easy and obvious when my consumption pattern changes
I'm with Octopus.
Previously Eon and BG.
All as dual fuel suppliers
All have tried to foist smart meters on to me.
The latest was;
Your electricity meter will go out of calibration at the end of this year, we need to fit a new one and it will be a smart meter as the old style meters are no longer made.

I have submitted monthly meter readings for years and can't recall anyone coming to read the electricity and gas meters even when switching suppliers. I have had a the same line about needing new meters. It may be true in that meters have a finite calibration life and they are required to replace them at a certain age. That said I've lived in the same house for over 30 years and the gas meter is the original one installed in 1990. The electricity meter has been replaced but only once.

The new generation of smart meters will allow suppliers to regulate the usage of each home.
This to allow, for example, reduction in voltage during periods of high demand.
This, we are told, to prevent blackouts.
But, it will also allow the powers that be to blackout an area large or small, for any given period of time, should the power that is, deem it necessary.

I don't see any mechanism that the supplier can use to reduce voltage because that is determined by the transformer tappings at the substation and cannot be changed by a meter, smart or otherwise. Transformer tappings can be changed remotely or even automatically according to the load on the transformer but even then they limited by law to maintain voltage in the range -6% to + 10 %. In practice the voltage variations are usually very much smaller. In theory they could manage domestic consumption in a small way but it's very much more problematic to do that for industry. They may be able to disconnect the supply of electricity but they will never be able to do that for gas as the risk of air entering the system makes it simply too dangerous.
 

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