speaker cable markings

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mercmanuk

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on speaker cables is the striped usually + or -?
 
But if you didn't know how one end was connected, the normal standard would be?
 
does it matter if its wired with the right polarity when using a crossover on component speakers
 
But if you didn't know how one end was connected, the normal standard would be?
If you connect a meter switched to millivolts AC join one lead to ground (chassis) turn the radio on and play some music, connect the other lead to one of the 2 wires,, the one that makes the meter read (it will be all over the place) is the + lead.

To find the + on a loudspeaker,connect an AA cell over the terminals and the cone will move in or out, the one that makes it move out, will be the one that the + of the battery is connected to
 
does it matter if its wired with the right polarity when using a crossover on component speakers

Yes it does the speaker must be in phase,, if not the sound will be diffused and little base.

On my earlier post, I meant it does not matter as long as the speaker each side is wired the same
 
cheers for the advise
 
Everything Malcolm says is correct, convention is that the striped wire is the 'plus'. There may be a red dot on one of the speaker terminals and it goes to that one.
 
Everything Malcolm says is correct, convention is that the striped wire is the 'plus'.

This is my understanding about after market speakers that come with wires. Likely elsewhere too but when I look at my MB, it is the ground wire that is striped (seems to be brown "like ground" plus a stripe).

Anyway one should remember that amps today are bridged, there is no "real ground wire" in the sense that it would remain at ground potential and would be common with all speakers. The notation is there only to gain the correct speaker phasing as TV mentioned.
 
Everything Malcolm says is correct, convention is that the striped wire is the 'plus'. There may be a red dot on one of the speaker terminals and it goes to that one.

That's what I wondered. I have always assumed so and followed this with my own speaker wiring but good to know it's the accepted norm.
 
Hi, Can I just confirm, on MB speaker connections the striped wire is +

Thanks

Ian
 
See post no8 the convention in a two wire speaker lead [one lead with a colour tracer the other lead plain] is the wire with tracer is positive. Thats the convention How an installer has connected the wiring might be different of course but unlikely.
 
Im afraid it does matter - the + coming from the system should be wired to the +ve on the speaker, or else the cone does not function in the correct manner. It moves in the opposite direction if it is wired the wrong way.
 
See post no8 the convention in a two wire speaker lead [one lead with a colour tracer the other lead plain] is the wire with tracer is positive. Thats the convention How an installer has connected the wiring might be different of course but unlikely.

I know thats convention, and I was just double checking mercedes stuck to convention. Plus it will save time during the install.

I don't want my speakers going backwards :)

Thanks

Ian
 
Im afraid it does matter - the + coming from the system should be wired to the +ve on the speaker, or else the cone does not function in the correct manner. It moves in the opposite direction if it is wired the wrong way.
As mentioned earlier in this thread, it only matters in the sense that all speakers need to wired in the same phase, i.e. each lead with the tracer must go to the same terminal on each speaker, either the +ve or the -ve: it matters not a jot which.
 
What he said.

If I had any doubt I would check the cables at the source (head unit / amp) and the speakers just to be sure.

Any doubt would be overcome by using a multimeter on the open circuited cables to check.
 
As mentioned earlier in this thread, it only matters in the sense that all speakers need to wired in the same phase, i.e. each lead with the tracer must go to the same terminal on each speaker, either the +ve or the -ve: it matters not a jot which.

Sorry to disagree, but actually, it does matter...........
The positive side of the speaker must be wired to the positive side of the amplifier and likewise the negative terminal of the speaker must be wired to the negative output terminal of the amplifier.
If its reversed (positive to negative), then the speaker will not "push" the speaker cone forward to make the sound. It will instead "pull" the cone backward. You will lose a degree of "punch" in the sound and will be bland and flat.
I agree its even more important to make sure ALL speakers are wired the same, otherwise they will be out of phase, and one speaker will be "pushing" and the other will be "pulling". In effect, cancelling each other out. The sound will then be really thin and lacking in all bass.


.
 
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Except that it's AC. For every positive swing there will be an equivalent negative swing.
All that matters is that the speakers are in phase.

At least that's what I was taught at my radio fitting course at Radiomobile in 1973 :)
 

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