SpeedFit vs Compression

Whitey

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I'm intending to use polypipe on my new plumbing system due to long complicated runs and for a reduction in joints under the floor).

I was just wondering what opinions were on using the Speedfit fittings vs a copper olive compression fitting ?

I'm quite confident in the push-fit fittings have used several now, but ultimately I think copper olives and compression tees would be best long term ?

Copper pipe might be best but prices are creeping up.

Cheers

Chris
 

Meldrew2

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The speedfit fittings are perfectly fine - as long as you cut the pipe cleanly (definitely not with a hacksaw)

If you really have to use compression fittings, make sure that you use metal inserts to prevent the plastic pipe squashing.
 

SPX

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Copper is more susceptible to temperature as well iirc so the push fittings are a good choice.
 

developer

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I try not to use anything with mechanical joints in inaccessible locations.

However, I know people who have used compression and speedfit for years, wihout problems.
 

flying haggis

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I have used speedfit in the past and have had no problems. Make sure you use a proper cutter for the pipe as a clean smooth end :eek: is essential to ensure watertightness and dont forget the pipe inserts even with speedfit style fittings.

cutter here

http://www.google.co.uk/aclk?sa=L&ai=CWirltZLcUP3NO82V0wWBvoDwCf2q2KACpeCs7ial_Ob2eQgFEAEoBVC43cLYBGC7vq6D0ArIAQeqBCRP0P1Vle4ne3gNgaU3mNWDiwqcU_XQahICWk6_mRTIzMgWeSvABQWgBiaAB-3j1R3gErXImorgxqetOg&sig=AOD64_2EDrHfW8TYw9oxQ_sE1ErZGUR3yQ&ctype=5&ved=0CD4Qww8&adurl=http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0025VKQW4/%3Ftag%3Dhydra0b-21%26hvadid%3D10340182029%26ref%3Dasc_df_B0025VKQW4&rct=j&frm=1&q=speedfit+pipe+cutter+

one benefit I found was that the fittings are rotatable even when fitted so installation is easier

guide here
http://www.johnguest.com/Home/literature-downloads/UK-Literature/DIY-Installation-Manual.aspx
 
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Piff

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Certainly easy to use & can be threaded through where copper is impossible.

I have known a couple of failures though - one was on installation with an O ring unseated and of course it was impossible to access easily (why speedfit was used in the first place)
The other was a few months after installation and was a split collar on the fitting causing a leak in a pipe boxing which only became apparent a few days later when the leaking water spread an started soaking up the adjacent walls.

I know a few plumbers and always ask - "what would you use in your own house?" The answer is usually copper with soldered joints - tried & tested for many years.
 
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Whitey

Whitey

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Thanks for the input so far !

Yes, I would like to use copper but I am planning to use a manifold system so in theory, the only joints will be at the manifold in a cupboard, then at the radiator end. By using polypipe, I won't have to have any other joints in between . . .

That's the plan anyway !
 

Piff

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Thanks for the input so far !

Yes, I would like to use copper but I am planning to use a manifold system so in theory, the only joints will be at the manifold in a cupboard, then at the radiator end. By using polypipe, I won't have to have any other joints in between . . .

That's the plan anyway !
Sounds like a good idea if all joints can be accessed. I've just put in underfloor heating using similar system (14mm plastic pipe from these people)
 
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Whitey

Whitey

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I have been looking at the Nu Heat stuff for a while, but after trying out a plinth heater (that takes heat from the central heating circuit) I think the place would become too hot !
 

Peter T

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I was advised by a plumber friend, if you use comp fittings on plastic pipe, use only copper olives not the brass ones.

Also, take care if you use in-line stop-cocks. I had one come appart on me and found that, on one side of the fitting, the depth of entry of the pipe is short and the olive is close the end of the pipe. The combination of this and a brass olive and the pipe slid out under pressure!
 
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Whitey

Whitey

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Everything on the incoming mains will be copper as far as possible; which reminds me I need to find a key to turn off the water meter/road stop **** . . .

^ valve
 

Piff

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I have been looking at the Nu Heat stuff for a while, but after trying out a plinth heater (that takes heat from the central heating circuit) I think the place would become too hot !
Thermostats!
 

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