Spotted In The Scrapyard.

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Any guesses ?

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My wife had an old H plate white Orion Ghia Injection when I met her.....basically the thinking man's (or woman's) XR3i. Best thing about it was the heated screen!
 
1986 Nissan Sunny

I had one of these in the early noughties......


........it was last.

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Rover 75

They were quite well thought of in their time and there are fewer and fewer left so they won't be at rock bottom forever. This is a late one (possibly pre-registered at the factory) and as with a lot of the other output from Rover they will start to fetch very good money in the not-too-distant future once they have finally been raised above Gumtree banger status and gained some sort of "classic" following.

And along with the MG variant, V6 examples like this should fetch a premium:

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I also thought the 75/ZT was a cracking car, but I never owned one. I did own a Rover 220 SDi at a similar time and it was a fast, frugal, comfortable and capable car at the time. It was very popular with the fair sex too which was a bonus.

I bought it because at the time it was temporarily about as fast as hot diesel hatches got with 105 PS in a relatively small and lightweight body, but the Golf soon eclipsed it when the 130 PS PF engine came along in the “red i” GTi.

I had been impressed with the Rover 600 ti, 820 Vitesse and 220 Coupe Turbo “Tomcat” which I used to drive at work from time to time, company cars for the senior manager. That gave it the edge over the Peugeot 306 Turbo D which was the only real alternative.

Back to the 75, I personally think they deserved more success.
 
Mini Clubman (or maybe a 1275GT on a good day):

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Back to the 75, I personally think they deserved more success.

Rover didn't exactly help themselves. When every other car manufacturer was looking ahead and embracing new technologies, someone at the company thought it would be a good idea to introduce sepia-tinted dials that looked like something off an octogenarian's mantlepiece:

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Rover didn't exactly help themselves. When every other car manufacturer was looking ahead and embracing new technologies, someone at the company thought it would be a good idea to introduce sepia-tinted dials that looked like something off an octogenarian's mantlepiece:

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What are you saying exactly 😊 think it’s very retro and stylish 😎
 
Rover didn't exactly help themselves. When every other car manufacturer was looking ahead and embracing new technologies, someone at the company thought it would be a good idea to introduce sepia-tinted dials that looked like something off an octogenarian's mantlepiece:

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It was at a time when in the same/similar the Jaguar S-type were also trying to reflect their back catalogue, and VW, Mini and Fiat tried to do the same, and there wasn’t really an established and successful formula to follow. I actually quite liked it back then, and I was a whippersnapper.
 
Rover didn't exactly help themselves. When every other car manufacturer was looking ahead and embracing new technologies, someone at the company thought it would be a good idea to introduce sepia-tinted dials that looked like something off an octogenarian's mantlepiece:

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Got to take issue with that statement!
Prior to Rover introducing the above, virtually all - if not literally all - dials were plain black with white numerals. All the same, without variation. Then Rover invigorated instrument design and the others followed.
 
Got to take issue with that statement!
Prior to Rover introducing the above, virtually all - if not literally all - dials were plain black with white numerals. All the same, without variation. Then Rover invigorated instrument design and the others followed.

Nobody but nobody followed that design and the company sank two or three years later !

Whilst their design of instrumentation was far from the only cause it helped to re-enforce the perception that they made cars that only appealed to pensioners who could still remember previous decades when Rovers were upmarket and desirable vehicles. That's never a good idea and when you're struggling for sales in a fiercely-competitive market you can't afford to project your brand in such a backward-looking way.

Then they went and introduced the City Rover.......
 
I suppose that this is a US equivalent of this thread:


I've actually posted a lot of these cars here (ADO16, Jaguar XJS, MGB, Ford 100E, Renault 5, Ford Capri, Yugo, Triumph TR7, Jaguar XJ40, Ford Granada, Porsche 924, Sunbeam Alpine, Lancia Beta).

And over the years I can remember seeing an early Triumph Spitfire, a Mark 1 Ford Consul, several Triumph Heralds, Volvo Amazons, Hillman Minxes and Rover P5s, quite a lot of BMC Farinas and MG Midgets, countless Mark 2 Cortinas, Jaguar XJ6s and Mercedes W114s / W115s and least one Jaguar Mark 1. And there are too many others to mention that I wish I had photographed.

However, all of these were before the days of digital / phone cameras and most will never be seen again in yards this side of the pond.

So I'll just have to make do with Peugeot 206s and Vauxhall Corsas......
 
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Saab 96:

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It was registered in Cumberland over half a century ago in March 1972:

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And I have sneaking suspicion that it may possibly have been a V4:

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I thought the Rover 600s had all gone by now but it seems I was wrong. This is a fairly early one and its last MOT expired in June 2007 so it has been lying idle collecting dust somewhere for many years:

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That hasn't turned for a long time:

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