Spray painting internal house doors

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mattc

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We have some curiously sized (read metric) doors in our house which are fibreboard with a plastic coating. they were fitted 20 odd years ago when the house was brand new and I guess the developer got them cheap due to the odd european sizing. I want to paint them as they have yellowed over the years.

Any suggestions how to do this. I was thinking of spraying them (can borrow a friends compressor) as I am certain i will not get a good finish if i use a brush. Something that concerns me is getting the paint to match with woodwork which needs doing to (by hand I hasten) - this would probably be gloss but may be satinwood.

What paint would I need to use as I have never sprayed using a compressor before.

matt
 
Metric doors are good..;)
Why not just paint them as normal, that way you will have a regular finish.
 
because I think it will look pony. The doors are smooth at the moment and with my crap brush technique I reckon I would make a right mess of it!

Given the plasticised finish to the doors will I need some special primer too?
 
Speak to these guys, they might give you some tips as it will cost a lot to get someone else to do it. We've used them on a couple of projects - problem with spray finish is it looks great when new but can chip and scratch and then it looks cack. Good old gloss paint, whilst not as nice is easier to maintain in good order especially if you use a roller.


Ade
 
Given the plasticised finish to the doors will I need some special primer too?

Unlikely as all paint is plastic really.

Just learn to paint properly..:D
 
hmm; dont like the "looks cack" bit. Presumably with a 10 year old who is like the proverbial bull this would not be a good idea.

If I go down the gloss route will i need a primer? or will it stick? (dont want to try a door only to find its crap.)
 
Gloss (or satin paint), gloss paint roller. No brush marks, decent finish.

Don't buy own-brand Quick Dry Satin from Homebase. It's got a very low opacity, and little adhesion. I've just done our hall stairs and landing with it, and I'm really disappointed
 
Gloss (or satin paint), gloss paint roller. No brush marks, decent finish.

Don't buy own-brand Quick Dry Satin from Homebase. It's got a very low opacity, and little adhesion. I've just done our hall stairs and landing with it, and I'm really disappointed

With paint I tend to buy Dulux - bit more expensive but better to work with.

P.S. forgot to mention that the doors downstairs have crappy mouldings on them so the transfer from brush to roller might look crap
 
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If I go down the gloss route will i need a primer? or will it stick? (dont want to try a door only to find its crap.)

You shouldn't need primer but will need undercoat.
 
mattc said:
With paint I tend to buy Dulux - bit more expensive but better to work with.

Even so, it can be a good thing to get trade rather than 'domestic'.

A client told me a while back that trade paints have a higher opacity, and therefore give better coverage. And they're cheaper measure for measure. Only problem is, you have to buy a bigger tin.
 
Even so, it can be a good thing to get trade rather than 'domestic'.

A client told me a while back that trade paints have a higher opacity, and therefore give better coverage. And they're cheaper measure for measure. Only problem is, you have to buy a bigger tin.

when you say Trade do you mean like Leyland?
 
Agree, own brand satin to be avoided - my bedroom skirting and radiator still looks like primer despite multiple coats.. I'd suggest decent non drip gloss white or get a professional in ;)

I wouldn't worry about the mouldings, provided the paint bonds it will look like a painted timber door.

You could look at the cost of hanging new blanks - they don't cost much.

We always specify Dulux as they give out the biggest swatch. :)

Really nice stuff is Farrow & Ball, but maybe not appropriate in this case.


Ade
 
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Yes, but you can also get Dulux trade, among others. You'll have to go to a builders' merchant as opposed to a DIY shed,
 
Agree, own brand satin to be avoided - my bedroom skirting and radiator still looks like primer despite multiple coats.. I advocate decent non drip gloss white or get a professional in ;)

Too tight to pay someone:eek:

I wouldn't worry about the mouldings, provided the paint bonds it will look like a painted timber door.

thats good to hear

You could look at the cost of hanging new blanks - they don't cost much.

Would agree but for the non-standard sizes - hence would need to cut and fit. Have no idea who original manufacturer was I am afraid.

We always specify Dulux as they give out the biggest swatch. :)

Really nice stuff is Farrow & Ball, but maybe not appropriate in this case.

Agree, lovely paints but will save them for the day I buy my Victorian/Edwardian country pile:rolleyes:


Ade

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Trade paints generally have quicker flashing off times, so need quicker handling and are more difficult to brush out.
 
How about something like the Earlex HV1900 Spray System? Check the Earlex web site or Axminster.co.uk are one seller quoting £50.
 
Saw some nice oak doors on the weekend - never need painting!
 
Not Swedoor by any chance are they?

Apparently pricey when new - or so I'm told.

They look great when mint - but when the surface is damaged it pretty much writes off the door.
 
Just use a small sponge roller plus a brush for the mouldings and something like Dulux eggshell. I just finished replacing all our old brown interior doors with moulded panel doors, 13 in total + handles, hinges, latches etc. 2 coats per side per door. Thats 52 coats of paint and not one single run !
 
Farrow & Ball Eggshell. V good paint, I've painted 25 doors with it. Use a nicely worn real bristle brush, it'll look great.
 

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