Tesco diesel

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The switches aren't on the tanker. The line injection for final fuel additives is upstream of the tanker. Unless what you're saying is that the tanker drops part of the load into forecourt brand-X and another part in forecourt brand-Y. If it's the latter, there has been a major departure from how it was being managed when I was involved.
 
Shell advertise their low-end fuel as 'fuel save', suggesting that their basic fuel (not V-power) provides more mpg over competitors' standard fuel.

This must be true or someone would have complained to the ASA by now.

I don't personally care too much about mpg, but to my mind this is proof that each retailer does use its own additives, which are different to other retailers' additives.

And this should put to rest the myth that 'all fuels are the same because they come the same oil refinery'.

Granted, the actual differences between the benefits derived from the various additive packs may not be that tangible, but this is a separate discussion.
 
How do they put the additives in?
By line injection units at the distribution terminal.

It's a bit like the fizzy drinks dispenser in your favourite pub. The fizzy water is common, but the dispensing person presses a button to select which flavour concentrate is added.
 
Well it better be a method that ensures even distribution throughout the tank capacity.
 
...Unless what you're saying is that the tanker drops part of the load into forecourt brand-X and another part in forecourt brand-Y. If it's the latter, there has been a major departure from how it was being managed when I was involved.

I doubt this very much. The fuel tankers are branded, and I don't recall ever seeing a Shell tanker in an Esso garage or a Tesco tanker in a Sainsburys etc.
 
Well it better be a method that ensures even distribution throughout the tank capacity.
Part of the additive packet includes a 'carrier' which helps with distribution. In any case it's not a case of pouring a bucket full into a big tank. It's carefully metered in when fuel is drawn down by the tankers.
 
I doubt this very much. The fuel tankers are branded, and I don't recall ever seeing a Shell tanker in an Esso garage or a Tesco tanker in a Sainsburys etc.
Good point, though some tankers are plain unbranded units. And if for example a Greenergy tanker pulls up at a Tesco forecourt, I've no idea if the same tanker could then stop at an Asda down the road as its next drop (a detail too far away from my role).
 
Maybe we should make this a sticky?

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Great variety of posts with loads of accounts of different fuels but my original post was why does my diesel Mercedes w204 c220 cdi with a om646 engine run noticeably smoother on regular Tesco diesel, I have tried all makes and varieties of fuels and additives but Tesco fuel runs smoother and with less noise, do i have a fault somewhere or just lucky that my car likes cheap fuel⛽

Its good you're happy with Tesco diesel but in my experience I have noticed no difference.
 
Trouble is I prefer to fill with shell v power for its cleaning properties but do like the quieter engine with Tesco fuel, decisions decisions
 
Trouble is I prefer to fill with shell v power for its cleaning properties but do like the quieter engine with Tesco fuel, decisions decisions

Have you considered a 50:50 mix? Lol
 
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Have a look at 0:28

Good find.

The tanker driver has a key card that identifies him/his vehicle/compartment size (there can be 6 x 5000+ ltrs in each) and what fuels he can load (diesel/unleaded) the total quantity and which company he works for and whether additives should be added.

It's all done by computer.
Simples.
 
Pity there was no more discussion of CETANE rating rather than octane rating as this would be more pertinent to the OP'S original post. Cetane number - Wikipedia
While checking on some background I did come across this reference to B10 biodiesel which might be of interest to MERCEDES owners taking their cars to France.
B10 diesel fuel: vehicle compatibility list | European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA)

Which brings up the question of UK market fuel labelling both on the vehicle and the dispensing pump. I don't buy much fuel nowadays so don't frequent the filling station forecourt often. Are fuel pumps adequately labelled such that consumers are adequately informed as to the type of fuel they are buying? I have no doubt they will be labelled "somewhere" but is it obvious/clearly expressed enough ?
https://assets.publishing.service.g...l-consumer-protection-fuel-pump-labelling.pdf
 
Cetane is essentially a rating of how easily a fuel spontaneously ignites. Higher cetane fuels ignite more easily than lower cetane fuels, (which is sort of the opposite of octane). Cetane boosters such as 2-EHN (actually a quite hazardous material) can be useful to help the initial combustion which mimics the effect of higher cetane base fuel. Cetane is (I think) the old name for a saturated C16 paraffin, which is likely to ignite quite readily.

U.K. Diesel is formulated to EN:590, which if memory serves, specifies a nominal cetane number of 50, so it's likely to be somewhere near that figure, but will vary batch to batch.

High cetane number, doesn't necessarily equate to higher power output or better fuel economy and there are a number other features of diesel fuels that are important, e.g. Cold filter plugging, wax point, lubricity, viscosity, sulphur content, density, bio content and so on.

The OP's post was about combustion noise, which is pretty much down to ignition delay (as mentioned in #69). Cetane rating is one factor that affects ignition delay, but it's not the only factor and it's difficult to speculate on what the causes are for a specific case without more detail about the fuels involved.
 

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