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Since we are supporting Ukraine in a significant way I would have thought that would up our score considerably.
I get that supporting Israel isn't so popular, but to finish 13 places behind them is a surprise.

Surly Brexit isn't still marking us down.

In this song contest.
Shirley,

We came 2nd in 2022, shortly after Brexit. Basically our (joint) second best ever result.

We were coming last LONG before Brexit.

Sadly the UK produces World class pop stars, but not Eurovision winners



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5 Last places out of 23 competitions.... ouch.
Tbh who gives a rats you know what. Eurovision is clearly very political in it's voting and has little to do with music that the majority of people listen to day in day out. If we are going to remain as one of the 5 national broadcasters who pay most of the annual costs we should embrace the weirdness, oddness and down right freak show that it's become and find some complete space cadet every year.... At least then we get to inflict some real dross on the European public; some of them might even recognise it for the "fluff you" gesture that it would be 😂.
 
Eurovision is clearly very political in it's voting and has little to do with music...
....the weirdness, oddness and down right freak show that it's become
This.

In previous years, had my young child been around, I would have watched it with them. But what was on Saturday night!? Now I have a young child; Forget that. I turned it off.
 
This.

In previous years, had my young child been around, I would have watched it with them. But what was on Saturday night!? Now I have a young child; Forget that. I turned it off.
Interesting that the eu flag wasn't allowed.
Fancy calling that political (I say with sarcasm), and saying it wasn't allowed because it was political.

They should ban the voting.
 
Interesting that the eu flag wasn't allowed.
Fancy calling that political (I say with sarcasm), and saying it wasn't allowed because it was political.

They should ban the voting.
Dear EU, you are not a country and you weren't competing so what's it to do with you?

I did laugh how the great and the good of the EU were getting excised by the "snub"..... I'm sure soon Eurovision will be another great idea we have the EU to thank for 😉
 
I think it makes sense to not allow flags other than those of countries competing.

There waa a real risk that the pro-Palestinian mob would ruin the event (as they have tried to do).
 
Interesting that the eu flag wasn't allowed.
Fancy calling that political (I say with sarcasm), and saying it wasn't allowed because it was political.

They should ban the voting.
Astonishing really.

Hopefully at this year’s Olympics we’ll see the EU at the top of the medal table, ahead of both the USA and China, as per Verhofstadt’s dream

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Eurovision will be another great idea we have the EU to thank for 😉
It being a great idea is toooo far back in history for the eu to understand.
The Common Market, well yeh, I would have to concede that (a year later).
 
When the first Eurovision Song Contest was held on May 24, 1956, little did we know that it was a pilot by the evil master puppeteers of the WEF to create a united Europe neehahahaha

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When the first Eurovision Song Contest was held on May 24, 1956, little did we know that it was a pilot by the evil master puppeteers of the WEF to create a united Europe neehahahaha

Screenshot-20240514-212032-Chrome.jpg
From Eurovision itself:

"As television services were introduced in most European countries in the mid 20th century, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) created the Eurovision Network in 1954 for the exchange and production of common television programmes, in order to cost-effectively increase the programming material for national broadcasting organisations"
The proposal for the Eurovision Network had come from Marcel Bezençon, the director general of the Swiss Broadcasting Corporation. But the idea for the Eurovision Song Contest would come from RAI. The Italian national broadcasting organisation began regular television services in January 1954, although the first experimental television broadcasts in Italy had occurred in Turin in 1934.

"The most popular and successful programme that the Eurovision Network would produce would be its namesake: the Eurovision Song Contest. After the Eurovision Network broadcast its first programmes in 1954 in Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and (what was then) West Germany, discussions ensued in the EBU as to how its co-productions could be made more entertaining and spectacular.

"Following suggestions put forward at the meeting of its Programme Committee in Monte Carlo, Monaco in 1955, the EBU decided at the session of its General Assembly in Rome later in that year to establish the Eurovision Song Contest. The inspiration for the Contest came from RAI, which had been staging Festival di Sanremo (the Sanremo Italian Song Festival) in the seaside resort town of the same name from 1951. Members of the Programme Committee attended the Sanremo Italian Song Festival in 1955, when it was also broadcast through the Eurovision Network.

"However, Sanremo was not the only song contest in Italy at the time: in the mid-1950s, the City of Venice and RAI organised the International Song Festival in Venice. The first edition in 1955 included entries submitted by the radio services of EBU members from Austria, Belgium, France, Italy, Monaco and the Netherlands. They each submitted six songs that were original and no longer than 3 and a half minutes, with the entries being voted on by national juries and the winner being awarded the Golden Gondola prize.

......

Yet, for technical reasons, the first Eurovision Song Contest in 1956 was not held in Italy but in Switzerland: its geographical centrality in Europe made it a natural node for the terrestrial transmitters required for this experiment in live, simultaneous, transnational broadcasting. The EBU’s headquarters were also in Switzerland. But the first Eurovision Song Contest still reflected an international fashion for Italian popular culture, as it was staged in the Swiss-Italian city of Lugano and was hosted in Italian.

In those first few Contests it seemed obvious to participating artists that they should enter songs sung in their native tongue, but as the event expanded and grew in popularity, songwriters began to assume that the more universal the lyrics, the more likely the song would resonate with juries. Which could explain the popularity of classic Eurovision winners like Boom Bang A Bang and La La La.

 
International events are vital for mutual understanding.

Which is why Brussels does deserve recognition for the European Union's success in creating the Olympics, NATO, the Nobel Peace Prize, Eurovision, and the World Wide Web.




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Ah, but, because of the wonderful mayor I bet both cars were ulez compliant so didn't kill anyone with their fumes!
And if they weren’t he would’ve charged them £12.50 to make them compliant.

Knowing the way our illustrious mayor thinks, the powers that be will put more effort in chasing non payers of ULEZ fines than people that shoot innocent women on the streets.
 
From Eurovision itself:

"As television services were introduced in most European countries in the mid 20th century, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) created the Eurovision Network in 1954 for the exchange and production of common television programmes, in order to cost-effectively increase the programming material for national broadcasting organisations"
The proposal for the Eurovision Network had come from Marcel Bezençon, the director general of the Swiss Broadcasting Corporation. But the idea for the Eurovision Song Contest would come from RAI. The Italian national broadcasting organisation began regular television services in January 1954, although the first experimental television broadcasts in Italy had occurred in Turin in 1934.

"The most popular and successful programme that the Eurovision Network would produce would be its namesake: the Eurovision Song Contest. After the Eurovision Network broadcast its first programmes in 1954 in Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and (what was then) West Germany, discussions ensued in the EBU as to how its co-productions could be made more entertaining and spectacular.

"Following suggestions put forward at the meeting of its Programme Committee in Monte Carlo, Monaco in 1955, the EBU decided at the session of its General Assembly in Rome later in that year to establish the Eurovision Song Contest. The inspiration for the Contest came from RAI, which had been staging Festival di Sanremo (the Sanremo Italian Song Festival) in the seaside resort town of the same name from 1951. Members of the Programme Committee attended the Sanremo Italian Song Festival in 1955, when it was also broadcast through the Eurovision Network.

"However, Sanremo was not the only song contest in Italy at the time: in the mid-1950s, the City of Venice and RAI organised the International Song Festival in Venice. The first edition in 1955 included entries submitted by the radio services of EBU members from Austria, Belgium, France, Italy, Monaco and the Netherlands. They each submitted six songs that were original and no longer than 3 and a half minutes, with the entries being voted on by national juries and the winner being awarded the Golden Gondola prize.

......

Yet, for technical reasons, the first Eurovision Song Contest in 1956 was not held in Italy but in Switzerland: its geographical centrality in Europe made it a natural node for the terrestrial transmitters required for this experiment in live, simultaneous, transnational broadcasting. The EBU’s headquarters were also in Switzerland. But the first Eurovision Song Contest still reflected an international fashion for Italian popular culture, as it was staged in the Swiss-Italian city of Lugano and was hosted in Italian.

In those first few Contests it seemed obvious to participating artists that they should enter songs sung in their native tongue, but as the event expanded and grew in popularity, songwriters began to assume that the more universal the lyrics, the more likely the song would resonate with juries. Which could explain the popularity of classic Eurovision winners like Boom Bang A Bang and La La La.

70 years on, did the bureaucracy of the EBU (European Broadcasting Union) succeed in encouraging the sharing of programmes across EUrope?

A quick glance at your TV shows the wealth of European TV content and internationally formatted programmes at your command.

The closest we’ve got is “Who wants to be a Millionaire” and “Dancing with the Stars” being duplicated but with different languages and set ups.

All despite the EBU
 
What I want to know is how much the BBC spends on Eurovision each time. Given that the presenters and numerous unneeded hangers on all go on a nice little jolly when in reality the whole thing could be commentated on from someone's front room these days!
 

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