Tips for 18y old learning to drive

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by tylerdurden, Jun 28, 2017.

  1. tylerdurden

    tylerdurden Active Member

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    Son has reached the age.

    Cannot remember my days it was so long ago.

    Anyway, need a bit of advice

    Any tips on finding a good driving school (other than personal recommendations - which I will be looking for).

    Also, any idea what the average number of lessons is before being told your OK to sit the test? I know this will vary but there will be a median number of lessons

    Ta
     
  2. moonloops

    moonloops MB Enthusiast

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    7 to 12 lessons to pass the test in the old days.

    Nowadays, the theory test can be done by an above average house brick.

    Word of advice for anyone starting out driving, the very first sign of a bad driver is one that has to use their horn.
     
  3. mickday

    mickday Active Member

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    I have had four teenagers who have gone through the learning to drive process in the last 8 years.

    They have all varied in the number of lessons but probably quickest was about 20 (oldest son) and 40 (oldest girl)

    As for driving school reviews from others is always the best way
     
  4. ph47mf

    ph47mf Active Member

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    I think you've taken on too much responsibility, get him to do everything.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    tylerdurden

    tylerdurden Active Member

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    LOL; I'm paying.......therefore I'm interested.
     
  6. ph47mf

    ph47mf Active Member

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    if you're paying, do what my dad did, he used to take me to a private road and taught me the basic controls - starting and stopping, controlling the clutch and parking. If he can master these in his own time, when he actually have lessons the tutor can skip all these and use the precious time on gaining experience on the road, it will save you quite a bit of money.
     
  7. PobodY

    PobodY MB Enthusiast

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    Likewise, I'd give him a bit of practice somewhere quiet (like an empty car park) just driving back and forth getting comfortable controlling the car. - Unfortunately if it's quite different from the one he'll take the test in, this may become counterproductive.

    I'm trying to remember the tips I was taught:
    Things like making a point to turn your head when you check the mirrors so that the assessor can see that you're doing it.
     
  8. Mattns

    Mattns Active Member

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    Also supplement lessons with an instructor with time behind the wheel of the family car on regular journeys. My wife and I used to let my sons take the wheel two or three times a week, no particular lesson but racks up the experience and road craft. If you live in a rural area some time on a narrow country lane is also good, if your nerves can stand it :)
     
  9. kid-jensen

    kid-jensen MB Enthusiast

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    As above, there's no substitute for driving experience, assuming you give the correct amount of adviuce and "constructive" criticism to avoid picking up bad habbits.

    Any time you have to go somewhere, get your son to drive, all experience counts.

    I managed to use this philosophy all those years ago when I was learning. In the end I had 2 actual lessons with a driving school, and the instructor said I really only needed one.
    Seemed to work as I passed first time.

    Mind, I studdied WAY harder for the Driving test thsan I did in any of my exams!
     
  10. OP
    OP
    tylerdurden

    tylerdurden Active Member

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    Thanks all.

    Our family cars are all large and auto's. Prob not best to learn on.

    Presume need extra insurance for a learner
     
  11. kid-jensen

    kid-jensen MB Enthusiast

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    Yes you do, but the premium will skyrocket when he actually passes his test!

    Go figure.....
     
  12. ph47mf

    ph47mf Active Member

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    if he has a car in mind he wants to buy after the test, buy it now and practice on it. After he has passed, he will be completely comfortable with it.
     
  13. garycat

    garycat Active Member

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    Get a MkI Ford Ka - easily the best car to learn in, the cheapest insurance and surprising fun too.

    Take him to a deserted car park to learn the basic controls, balancing clutch & revs, knowing where the brake is instinctively when you need it on the roads (and you will!)

    Let them drive as much as possible to get road time, even if it's just to Lidl and back.
     
  14. mat8n

    mat8n Banned

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    You do realise he could have been driving for a year now?
     
  15. Darrell

    Darrell MB Enthusiast

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    [QUOTE Nowadays, the theory test can be done by an above average house brick..[/QUOTE]

    16 years after I passed my driving test I took my bike test and therefore had to sit the hazard perception test. I failed!
     
  16. rhud

    rhud Active Member

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    Tell him 1.It's not a sport and 2. Always be on the lookout for some other driver doing something stupid.
     
  17. fabes

    fabes MB Enthusiast

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    Learner insurance was £400 on a £500 Corsa 1.0 my daughter bought.
    The extra time behind the wheel it gave over the 1 hour, once a week with instructor was the reason she has passed within a year of starting (first time, she's unbearably smug......,)

    One on Admiral multi car is only £950 now. That's not even £100 a month which was my objective to better

    Would thoroughly recommend getting a learner car as adding to family cars is expensive and could cost you your Ncd. Also a chance to look after a little run about
     
  18. John

    John Hardcore MB Enthusiast

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    I did this. Got insured on my mum's car, my dad took me out to master the basics on a quiet road and then pushed me into the deep end. I got up to speed quite quickly (excuse pun) and I drove everywhere as a named learner driver when the need arose.

    I think my brother did the same but in his own car.

    Saved a fortune - insurance was £130 back in 1993. Only needed 3 lessons from our local instructor. I used him because my brother did but I don't know if he was known to be good or not but he turned out to be good anyway as I passed first time.

    Luckily my mum only ever drove manuals.

    Auto-only cars ruins that idea though!

    I also studied way harder for my driving test than I ever did for any exams I did - including for the 2:1 honours degree I got.
     
  19. PobodY

    PobodY MB Enthusiast

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    Surely an S15 Silvia is the right car to learn to drive in?

    [YOUTUBE]https://youtu.be/WaAu4L2cl4c[/YOUTUBE]

    Plus, power slides are something every 18 year-old needs to know for after they've passed. :D
     
  20. E63AMG

    E63AMG Active Member

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    My son did an intensive course & passed 5 days after his 17th birthday. My daughter passed 3 months to the day after her 17th. The secret is definitely booking the test & working to that timeframe. Don't just keep going for lessons with no target date as it will run in & on. Then, they'll say, you're ready we'll put in for your test. Then you're kicking your heels for 8 weeks waiting, having another lesson or 2 a week. It's all not that hard. Get a good instructor who'll show them what's needed & do loads of hours yourself to get their confidence up.

    Lastly, don't listen to horror stories from non petrol heads that think everything to do with driving is mystical!

    Nige.
     

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