Train journey home.

Discussion in 'OT (OFF Topic) Forums' started by Dieselman, Aug 15, 2008.

How fast can an intercity 125 go with only one engine?

  1. 125mph

    16 vote(s)
    55.2%
  2. 100mph

    7 vote(s)
    24.1%
  3. 80mph

    5 vote(s)
    17.2%
  4. 62.5mph

    1 vote(s)
    3.4%
  1. OP
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    Dieselman

    Dieselman Banned

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    Near enough. It's called Serial Hybrid.
     
  2. OP
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    Dieselman

    Dieselman Banned

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    London to Aberdeen, say 600 miles.
    600 @ 9mpg = 66.6 gallons 303 litres.
    840g.km Co2. over say 400 passengers. 2g/km per passenger.
     
  3. Dryce

    Dryce MB Enthusiast

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    The locos don't work very hard at speed and may well coast on the flat sections.

    The 125 is an old design but they have recently been re-engined.

    The Australians also have some.

    Voyagers are just heavyweight diesel multiple units. Engines under each carriage. Not as bad as some of the older short haul units but internally they're not as refined as the old 125s or traditional loco hauled stock.
     
  4. Dryce

    Dryce MB Enthusiast

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    I'd disagree on a technicality.There's usually no battery so no energy storage. The engine has to run all the time.

    The electric generator and traction motors are really just being used as a transmission.
     
  5. st4

    st4 Banned

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  6. Dryce

    Dryce MB Enthusiast

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    Typically diesel powered trains are diesel-electric (as you suggest above) or diesel hydraulic. Some of the older multiple unit types were diesel-mechanical.

    I don't think there are any diesel-hydraulic locomotives in use the UK except in preservation. There are modern diesel-hydraulic multiple units (eg. class 170s which are ubiquitious in Scotland).
     
  7. OP
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    Dieselman

    Dieselman Banned

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    I understand the diesel-electric bit but thought if there was no battery it's a serial hybrid, where as it's a duplex if there is storage and two motor connections, e.g. engine and electric motor.
     
  8. st4

    st4 Banned

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    They have 170's down south. I saw one in Liverpool Street which surprised me, as I thought we just had them. I do find the 170's comfortable and pretty quiet, but nothing beats a separate locomotive and coaches. I take it the 156 & 158's use the same system.
     
  9. Dryce

    Dryce MB Enthusiast

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    That's just pseudo-clag when it's a 66 shed.

    37s know how to do it properly.:)
     
  10. Dryce

    Dryce MB Enthusiast

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    I'm quite happy to stand (or sit) corrected.

    I understood the serial hybrid as involving battery because to count as a hybrid it has to be able to move on electric power alone. Without the battery you simply have an electric transmssion system. ??
     
  11. Dryce

    Dryce MB Enthusiast

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    As far as I'm aware - yes.

    Diesel-Hydraulic seems to be prefered for traditional multiple units and Diesel-Electric for the long distance units.

    I don't like the 170s because of the placement of the doors. And the perpetual announcements. I actually like the 156s more. But I'm weird.
     
  12. OP
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    Dieselman

    Dieselman Banned

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  13. st4

    st4 Banned

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    You are, bad train taste. 156's are noisy and slow and quite old hat now.

    They run the 156 up the west highland line, and this is the train I get to work. For the life of me I don't know why they don't use a 158 or 170. I used to think it was that 156's were lighter, but they run a class 37 locomotive for the sleeper service and freight up that line.
     
  14. Colin_b

    Colin_b MB Enthusiast

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    They don't appear to be as bad, don't lay down quite the smokescreen that the 66's do.....

    We did have a couple of 37 idling away all day today just upwind of the office today, No smoke, just the smell!
     
  15. Dryce

    Dryce MB Enthusiast

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    Ah but I remember the older DMUs. The 156s were reasonably quiet (relatively rattle free) - 2+2 instead of 2+3 seating - and doors at each end (out of the way). I've had a lot of good naps on 156s.

    I don't think the 158s should be a problem as they use them on the Kyle line.

    They use a class 67 on the sleeper these days and it's got a quite high axle loading - class 37 is less. (You also get regular 66s and the odd 47, 57, and Deltic up the WHL). I can't see why the 170s couldn't be used.
     
  16. Dryce

    Dryce MB Enthusiast

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    Anytime I've seen a 66 at work it's been more of a heat shimmer off the top rather than a grey mass of particulates.

    Maybe it's a plot by the 37s to keep themselves going longer and into a fifth decade.
     
  17. verytalldave

    verytalldave MB Enthusiast

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    I didn't know I knew so many anoraks...............
     
  18. Kamisuma

    Kamisuma Active Member

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  19. Dryce

    Dryce MB Enthusiast

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    Takes one to know one.

    You just didn't realise until now.;)
     
  20. OP
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    Dieselman

    Dieselman Banned

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    Are you sure. I ask as it was defiantely covered as such and it makes sense. A rolling steel wheel on a steel rail doesn't deform anything like as much as a rubber tyre on tarmac. That takes energy.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolling_resistance

    This indicates 200-300 times less resistance.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2008

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