UK Border Agency Gets Tough

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Are asylum seekers allowed to work?

Yes.

With some restrictions.

It's part of the madness of the system. In a nice cosy world allowing asylum seekers to work is a reasonable principle. However in the real world it also acts as an economic incentive both to genuine asylum seekers and economic migrants. So it keeps the numbers increasing.

Never mind - it keeps an ecosystem of solicitors and barristers in comfort.
 
Are asylum seekers allowed to work?

In virtually all cases no, they aren't. In fact I have never seen an ARC (applicant registration card) that has had employment permitted on it (apart from a badly forged one).

However, I'm pretty sure that around 2010 something was done to address the situation of failed asylum seekers. These are people who's cases have been heard and subsequently refused and therefore had any access to benefits stopped. They were allowed to work pending removal from the UK.
 
However, I'm pretty sure that around 2010 something was done to address the situation of failed asylum seekers. These are people who's cases have been heard and subsequently refused and therefore had any access to benefits stopped. They were allowed to work pending removal from the UK.


Research briefings - UK Parliament

That's rather more restrictive than I understood it to be - but I love the note at the end about the EC putting forward proposals to make it less restrictive.
 
I feel sorry for the poor guy , being deported back to somewhere that was presumably so bad that he had to uproot himself and come here , perhaps leaving friends and family behind . Do you know where he was from ?

I expect his belongings , whilst of some value , are hardly uppermost in his mind right now - all the same , I hope you manage to get them back to him , and find another tenant too .
 
I feel sorry for the poor guy , being deported back to somewhere that was presumably so bad that he had to uproot himself and come here , perhaps leaving friends and family behind . Do you know where he was from ?

I expect his belongings , whilst of some value , are hardly uppermost in his mind right now - all the same , I hope you manage to get them back to him , and find another tenant too .
 
Sorry about the duplicate post above , which happened when my train went into a dead spot , too late to correct by the time I had reception again :(
 
Would you rather have him living on benefits

If you allow employment you potentially avoid paying benefits to those who can work. But you potentially enlarge the problem because it's likely to draw in more people.
 
Would you rather have him living on benefits

May sound harsh but all in all I'd rather he wasn't here at all.

I wonder how many countries he travelled through not requesting asylum before he ended up here claiming it?
 
None probably.

Most make a bee-line for 'benefit Britain'.
 
May sound harsh but all in all I'd rather he wasn't here at all.

I wonder how many countries he travelled through not requesting asylum before he ended up here claiming it?

It is harsh yes and for your info,I travelled a few countrys before deciding to settle here :thumb:

Why did I do that,so my kids can have a better life and better future ahead
 
It is harsh yes and for your info,I travelled a few countrys before deciding to settle here :thumb:

Why did I do that,so my kids can have a better life and better future ahead

Asylum seekers as defined by the 1951 Convention are expected to seek asylum in the first "safe" country they have opportunity to. Just because the UK is an island, does not mean we should have no asylum problem. Flights or ships are arriving into the UK constantly from all over the planet, but also - if the person is making their way to the UK using an agent, chances are they will be smuggled across borders and into the EU. Since Schengen has removed any internal borders of member states, once you're in one member state you can move freely throughout them all.

Basically it's quite feasible that someone can travel half way across the planet and the first officials they meet are in the UK.

Obviously there are also the many many people sleeping rough near northern European ports. Trying continuously to get to the UK and having continuous meetings with the local law enforcement. The Dublin convention and the use of Eurodac allows the UK to return asylum seekers to other EU member states if they have been seen by authorities there, but otherwise it is very hard to prove the travel history of someone who has no passport or ID and has been smuggled across borders from their home country.
 
Just adding my twopenneth based on experience. When my now wife first came to the UK to study English she was asked at passport control, "Would you like to work in the UK?". She knew that on a student visa she wasn't allowed to work here but she was honest and answered yes, just as we'd all say yes to "Would you like to win a £5 million on the lottery?" We know it's not going to happen but we'd still like it. Unfortunately the immigration officer didn't see it that way and refused her entry. I had arranged her course and accommodation in the UK, and I was at Heathrow to meet here and take her to Cheltenham. After a few hours of waiting, during which time I also managed to talk to the immigration officer, she was released "into my custody" until the next available flight back to her home country (a week later!). Although it wasn't pointed out to us, I discovered that she could submit an appeal. I helped her prepare and submit an appeal, which meant she could stay and study pending a court hearing. When eventually after 4 months it went to court the Immigration Officer was heavily criticised for being so petty and the case thrown out.

Helping her throughout all this turmoil brought us much closer together and we ended up getting married :) (after a couple more battles with Immigration at Heathrow!) That was in 1995. Since then she has set up her own business, employing ten English people and paying lots of tax, whilst not claiming a single penny in benefits of any kind.

We've also had a few problems getting permission for various members of my wife's family to come to the UK for short holidays, but my persistence has always paid off in the end. None of our visitors has been a cause for Governmental concern and have always returned home on time.

So the UK Border Agency can be very tough, but they appear to concentrate their efforts on easy and the wrong targets. That way, IMHO, they can push up their success stats and tell everyone how wonderful they are.
 
He has been in touch this afternoon and I'll provide an update tonight.
 
Just adding my twopenneth based on experience. When my now wife first came to the UK to study English she was asked at passport control, "Would you like to work in the UK?". She knew that on a student visa she wasn't allowed to work here but she was honest and answered yes, just as we'd all say yes to "Would you like to win a £5 million on the lottery?" We know it's not going to happen but we'd still like it. Unfortunately the immigration officer didn't see it that way and refused her entry. I had arranged her course and accommodation in the UK, and I was at Heathrow to meet here and take her to Cheltenham. After a few hours of waiting, during which time I also managed to talk to the immigration officer, she was released "into my custody" until the next available flight back to her home country (a week later!). Although it wasn't pointed out to us, I discovered that she could submit an appeal. I helped her prepare and submit an appeal, which meant she could stay and study pending a court hearing. When eventually after 4 months it went to court the Immigration Officer was heavily criticised for being so petty and the case thrown out.

Helping her throughout all this turmoil brought us much closer together and we ended up getting married :) (after a couple more battles with Immigration at Heathrow!) That was in 1995. Since then she has set up her own business, employing ten English people and paying lots of tax, whilst not claiming a single penny in benefits of any kind.

We've also had a few problems getting permission for various members of my wife's family to come to the UK for short holidays, but my persistence has always paid off in the end. None of our visitors has been a cause for Governmental concern and have always returned home on time.

So the UK Border Agency can be very tough, but they appear to concentrate their efforts on easy and the wrong targets. That way, IMHO, they can push up their success stats and tell everyone how wonderful they are.

Unfortunately any job where the powers that be base everything on facts and figures, hitting targets and producing impressive looking stats is the only way forward.

That's not to say that your now wife would have been refused entry purely because it would look good on the stats. The same as the person would not have been detained yesterday purely for stats.

Any refusal has to be referred up the chain and will only be authorised after in depth interviews of the passenger and any sponsors in the UK. Likewise this chap the OP told us about knew that his asylum claim had been rejected and that he was therefor liable to be removed. He wouldn't have been given any advance notice of this as people tend not to turn up!
 
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Both d w124 and knighterrant have given examples of immigration, not asylum.
 
That was in 1995.

The old IND was a didactic crazy nightmare back then. Wave through the chancers and stop the anybody who was legit on a quibble.

Refused my wife leave to enter (yup after we got married). Nightmare. Documentation FU that was *their* FU. No right of appeal. But 7 days to get back out - for which we were told to be grateful. Advice from UKIAS lawyer was for her not to leave. An MP (not our own as he was off at some party do) sorted it. IND were not particularly nice about that either as I know the details of one of the conversations.

I have yet to be convinced the UKBA is that much better - but it couldn't be worse. Now we pay through the nose if we need to get her passport updated. Judging by the way they handles things there is a bit more gracefulness when things are not quite right - but I'm deeply suspicious that their IT and backoffice process hasn't actually improved much in 20 years.
 
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