UK Border Agency Gets Tough

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I'm amazed he even managed to apply for asylum after a visa expired.

I thought you had to apply for asylum when you first arrive in the UK .. certainly, that's what all the signs at the airports say

I have no idea how the process works- perhaps that's why it's failed :dk:.
 
Asylum seekers must apply for asylum immediately they enter the country. Waiting until a visa issued for other reasons has expired, and only then then deciding they might be persecuted if they return home is not considered 'immediately'.
 
Asylum seekers must apply for asylum immediately they enter the country. Waiting until a visa issued for other reasons has expired, and only then then deciding they might be persecuted if they return home is not considered 'immediately'.

This is not correct.

During his tenure as Home Secretary, David Blunkett attempted to introduce a rule stating that all asylum seekers must make their claim within 48 hours of arrival in the UK. He was thwarted because for reasons that I still don't understand it was deemed unfair and in breach of the asylum seekers' rights.

They can wait until the system catches up with them before making a claim for asylum although a delay may prejudice their claim.
 
Presumably there is provision for someone to claim asylum if, for instance, the situation in their home country changes during the time that they are here on a visa?
 
Presumably there is provision for someone to claim asylum if, for instance, the situation in their home country changes during the time that they are here on a visa?

I believe this is what's happened here (though it's something personal to him, not a change to the country) and from what I can gather the visa expired around the same time.

I referred to the bizarre/fantastic story some posts ago.
 
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I believe this is what's happened here (though it's something personal to him, not a change to the country) and from what I can gather the visa expired around the same time.

I referred to the bizarre/fantastic story some posts ago.

As I said earlier - even from the limited info available, this sounds like there's going to be a lot more involved in this and I don't envy the case worker or solicitor tasked with trying to sort it all out at the last minute either!
 
Update - he has until 16th for his brief to make a successful case.

Also, he tells me that he may be able to leave the detention centre between now and the 16th, if money changes hands - something else his solicitor is involved in.
He has asked that I now don't take his gear to the shipping agent, so he must feel he will be able to return to his flat between now and then :dk:.

Strangely (I thought) we are able to keep in touch by phone/text.
 
When I lived/worked in the States during the 80s , i was questioned by the U.S. immigration department , and they checked my work permit each time i entered the country . I had no expectation that without correct documentation would i be allowed to live in their country . I do not doubt for one minute that your tenant is a decent , hardworking chap. That in itself does not entitle him to residency. Unfortunately for him we have been paying out a fortune in benefits and extortionate legal bills for a great many undesirable people that should not be in our country , and I for one welcome a tightening up on asylum seekers. strange is it not , that a large percentage of asylum seekers appear to be males aged 20- 50. If you had reason to flee the U.K. because some terrible fate awaited you , would you just leave the family behind?
 
I believe this is what's happened here (though it's something personal to him, not a change to the country) and from what I can gather the visa expired around the same time.

I referred to the bizarre/fantastic story some posts ago.


So he entered the country legally, and had a visa, which now expired. He then tried to seek asylum, and was denied, so he is due to be deported, pending his appeal.

So far this sounds nothing more than a very personal case - but from where I stand it seems that everyone acted as they should. It is neither an example of our open borders and negligent immigration control, nor is it an example of some horrific injustice imposed on someone by heartless UKBA officers... just a person having real difficulties, and his Landlord being affected by this ordeal. I have empathy for both.
 
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It's a completely new scenario for me (and I think, him).

In principle I don't have a problem with tightening immigration laws, as I'm sure we're a soft touch.

I also don't rent to asylum seekers or anyone without the correct papers - he had a visa and a salaried job.

Unfortunately, as with many things in life, generalisations don't cover the more personal side of individual circumstances.

Because of generalisations I've refrained from stating his birth country - any ideas?
 
It's a completely new scenario for me (and I think, him).

In principle I don't have a problem with tightening immigration laws, as I'm sure we're a soft touch.

I also don't rent to asylum seekers or anyone without the correct papers - he had a visa and a salaried job.

Unfortunately, as with many things in life, generalisations don't cover the more personal side of individual circumstances.

Because of generalisations I've refrained from stating his birth country - any ideas?


You mentioned Catholic I think - somewhere from the Balkans?

Or Syria.... the Sunni rebels are known for their low tolerance of Christians, as opposed to the current regime which is Shiite, who are generally more accommodating for other religions?
 
You mentioned Catholic I think - somewhere from the Balkans?

Christian - Nigeria - and that's a direct connection to his problem with going back home and the basis of his asylum claim. I'll pm you - see what you think.
 
I'm guessing he's from the North of the country, where they don't approve of worshipping the same God in an unapproved manner.
 
And the crux of the problem is that parts of Nigeria are safer for Christians. I don't deny living there is tough for most of the locals but he could just move within his own country and be perfectly safe from religious issues. Obviously I don't know all the facts but I can claim some familiarity with that country having grown up there as a child for 15 years and worked there in the early 1990's for 2 years.
 
A quick update for completeness.

He went before a judge this morning and is now at the airport destined for Lagos, with his final appeal having failed.

Ultimately, I'm a sad for him - a nice guy :(.
 
Could we get together and bust him out ?
 
There is a guy from Sheffield being deported to Cameroon, he's married to an English Woman and was due to be deported today but over the weekend tried to kill himself so deportation on hold.

As posted earlier the authorities are now getting tough on this no more lame excuses for not wanting to return to the Country of origin, they are having a real crack down and not before time.

I have absolutely no problem with Genuine asylum seekers who fear for their lives but they should seek asylum in the nearest safest Country rather than pass through them all to get to soft Britain

Time to adopt the Australian Immigration policy me thinks, although we don't have a Christmas Island we could use the Isle of Man or Isle of Wight :D
 
As posted earlier the authorities are now getting tough on this no more lame excuses for not wanting to return to the Country of origin, they are having a real crack down and not before time.

I have absolutely no problem with Genuine asylum seekers who fear for their lives but they should seek asylum in the nearest safest Country rather than pass through them all to get to soft Britain

Time to adopt the Australian Immigration policy me thinks, although we don't have a Christmas Island we could use the Isle of Man or Isle of Wight :D

I don't necessarily disagree with any of this, but it's more difficult when you know someone personally.
 

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