Waste Disposal Advice

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spinaltap

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I am contemplating adding a waste disposal unit to my existing sink since it was reported on the news that we might be required to place our unused foodstuffs in a 'slop bin' for council collection.

Given that I had not previously considered installing such a device on my existing Franke sink unit (the mains is close by, shared by the dishwasher), I would appreciate others' advice on what to consider in choosing a particular brand - and what pitfalls, if any, there may be.
 
We have had an Insinkerator 45 for 3 years...no problems at all.
 
We have had an Insinkerator 45 for 3 years...no problems at all.

We had an Insinkerator in our last place (can't remember the exact model) and had no trouble with it either.

Thought about getting one in our new place but it was soon forgotten (until you mentioned it now!)
 
Had a Frankie with the house - that lasted about 25 years (one repair/overhaul by me). Replaced with the cheapest Insinkerator from B&Q about 3 years ago - no problems.
 
Wastemaid and insinkerator are both good brands. Try to get a package with the air switch. Also buy the biggest powered unit you can justify it will take more abuse
 
Another vote for Insinkerator here. I've had one for the last 6 years and apart from having to use the key on it once to free it off when a rather large bone jammed it, it just works.

Personally, I'd go for the batch feed type as there's less opportunity to accidentally feed it spoons and other cutlery. Also, avoid putting anything too fatty or fibrous down it. Our food waste that goes in the bin is virtually nil since installing it.
 
Two thoughts. When it's operating it needs lots of water (is yours metered?) to flush waste.

Don't allow a teaspoon to gain access to it's insides. :eek:
 
Or a plug chain. Its amazing what the equivalent of 30 ball bearings does to a grinder.
 
The Insinkerator is a flail type, ie, small metal hammers on a rotating disc. The teaspoon might get dented a bit, but the machine is not damaged. The same for a chain.
 
Or get a couple of chickens.
They will eat ALL of your (and your friendly neighbour's) food waste, provide fresh eggs, give you manure for your tomatoes, cucumbers, chillies etc.

And after a couple of years good service, you can eat them.
 
we might be required to place our unused foodstuffs in a 'slop bin' for council collection.

We've had one of those for a couple of years, not known round here as a slop bin (doubtless Daily Mail tory scaremongering at work), rather as a food waste bin, not really much of a chore to use and surely better than polluting our water supply?
 
Isn't nick right?

I am not an expert. Won't adding organics to the sewage system increase our water bills in the long term and encourage rats. Whilst composting should reduce the quantity of land fill required and produce some methane for heating etc.
 
We've had one of those for a couple of years, not known round here as a slop bin (doubtless Daily Mail tory scaremongering at work), rather as a food waste bin, not really much of a chore to use and surely better than polluting our water supply?

Isn't nick right?

I am not an expert. Won't adding organics to the sewage system increase our water bills in the long term and encourage rats. Whilst composting should reduce the quantity of land fill required and produce some methane for heating etc.

Seeing as water treatment plants remove this detrius and make thousands of tonnes of "plant food" a year, I see nothing wrong with a waste disposal unit.
We have had an Insinkerator for the last 6 years with no probs.
 
cheers, I half expected it to be more complicated than it seems.

I suppose there is a scholarly article somewhere that I should read.
 
Also, avoid putting anything too fatty or fibrous down it.
Like a hand.:eek:

Actually SWMBO did turn ours on once with her hand in it (retrieving some small object that has fallen in). She a had bit of a mental block and meant to do something else with her free and and hit the switch instead. Luckilly it didn't have chance to gather any momentum and immediately stalled against her finger. Painful and a lost nail, but no long term damage. Very lucky.
 
Something to consider:
These devices are not 'eco':-
the initial manufacturing process uses raw materials & energy
they use electric
they use water
the output is more likely to sludge & cause blockages downstream
yes, the water companies produce compost, but the more waste there is the more energy they use to extract the material & process the water
cost- there is a initial financial purchase outlay & continuing cost to power it

Post #10 spot on ;), or use a composter- this cuts out a very long middle man & means you don't have to pay the water company to extract it & then pay the garden centre for the same compost....
 
We have a food cone provided free a while back by the council. It sits in a hole in the ground, chuck unused food in that can't go on the compost heap, and shut the lid. No smell or yukky stuff, and it "disappears", presumably worms, insects and other creepy-crawlies dispose of it for us.

Some food won't compost in the usual way and will attract vermin, the the cone deals with meat, etc, with no hassles.
 

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