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JHS

MB Enthusiast
Joined
Sep 8, 2020
Messages
1,903
Location
Lincolnshire, near Skegvegas.
Car
2020 Honda HR-V 1.6i DTEC EX
does it become uneconomical to own a car?
It is no secret that my mighty C250d S205 AMG Line P P+ is not a garage or driveway queen, it is a means of transport and used as such.In the last 2 years it has covered 14k and 16k miles.
Now I see many posts where folk talk about doing in the region of 5k a year, and i wonder how that is worth owning a car?
Not a criticism,we all have our own reasons, but ignoring the convenience factor at what point does it become uneconomical to own a car with capital tied up, interest lost,interest on finance,service,fuel,tax,maintenance such as tyre and brakes etc. maybe using a £25k car?
When does using public transport or taxis become more sensible?
 
Dunno either, i did around 2,500 miles in the SL last year, this year slightly less ..... and loved every single one of those miles! I did even less on the two motorbikes and the 4x4 did around 2000 miles...

But i do rack up around 8k a year in the fully electric works van.....
 
does it become uneconomical to own a car?
It is no secret that my mighty C250d S205 AMG Line P P+ is not a garage or driveway queen, it is a means of transport and used as such.In the last 2 years it has covered 14k and 16k miles.
Now I see many posts where folk talk about doing in the region of 5k a year, and i wonder how that is worth owning a car?
Not a criticism,we all have our own reasons, but ignoring the convenience factor at what point does it become uneconomical to own a car with capital tied up, interest lost,interest on finance,service,fuel,tax,maintenance such as tyre and brakes etc. maybe using a £25k car?
When does using public transport or taxis become more sensible?
Public transport is not an option at all , so I’ll pay whatever to have my own car .
 
I do about 8-10K a year in my X4, comprising a daily commute and longer holiday trips - some to the airport but others touring. It's not practical for us to take suitcases on public transport and my commute is to an area not served by trains/buses. While I could commute (and even travel to the airport) by taxi, I would need to hire a car for our longer trips, so for me a car is the obvious choice.

My wife does around 1-2K a year in her X1. On the face of it, it's not economical to keep it, but it's not just a matter of money.

It's convenience - there is no need to book taxis or study timetables, it's just a matter of getting in and driving. It's also easier to put shopping in the back straight from the trolley, then bring it into the house in stages - we're not getting any younger and sometimes you just need to take a breather. In the English weather, it's also very convenient to be able to step straight into a car rather than waiting, cold and wet, for a train or bus.

It's also a matter of costing individual journeys. It's one thing booking a taxi to and from the supermarket for £10 each time - there is a natural reluctance to avoid spending money so things get put off. The car, on the other hand, is already paid for, Road Tax and Insurance are annual payments and even putting fuel in the tank is something of a ten-weekly thing (for her). You perceive individual journeys as not having a direct cost and consequently things do not get put off.

Additionally, it's a matter of independence. I'm sure that most of us remember passing our driving test and getting our first car - the freedom to no longer to rely on buses or the "taxi of Mum and Dad". Giving up car ownership would feel a retrograde step.

Finally, and particularly appropriate at this time of the year, the car boot is a place where we can hide each other's Christmas presents without risk of peeking.
 
As a half way house, car clubs are doing well in London with ULEZ, large insurance uplifts, parking and increasing purchase prices meaning owning is not viable.

Not really a mileage directly reason, albeit many in London don't do that many miles.

I am with the consensus here though. It's convenient.
Owning a washing machine is also convenient but is (for most) a less emotional ownership / even hobby.

Is there an Indesit washing machine forum...?
 
Don't we own cars because we want to, and get enjoyment and convenience out of them? Using a pure cost argument, then we should also all downsize to the smallest viable home, and maybe just eat the basic nutritional requirement everyday. Going out for pleasure - you jest!
 
We bought an 02 plate Fiesta back in Feb this year for £1500.
It came with a new MOT, 43,000 on the clock, decent history and it’s ULEZ.

I’ve used it to bump over a grands worth of scrap lead and our daughter has been using it for college and her part time job.

Last week I spent £20 odd quid for some bulbs to be fitted by the Halfords bloke. Thats the total we’ve spent so far.

It’s earned us 3X what I paid for it so it’s surely the cheapest motoring possible.

The next MOT is in January so fingers crossed and you can see the car in the Cherished Numberplate thread.

For us it’s a washing machine, or a kettle.
 
Don't we own cars because we want to, and get enjoyment and convenience out of them? Using a pure cost argument, then we should also all downsize to the smallest viable home, and maybe just eat the basic nutritional requirement everyday. Going out for pleasure - you jest!

Exactly that.

I've had my SL for 19 years, and it's covered 15k miles in that time. Insurance, tax and servicing have all been relatively cheap, and it's probably lost very little in depreciation. There's not a huge amount of money tied up in it (I used a small inheritance from my grandmother to buy it), so I wouldn't have earned much in interest given the low rates we've had for ages now. I have a garage to keep it in. So why not? :)
 
I was covering an average of 2600 miles a year over a 3 year period in my E63.
It was worth £25k+ and I decided to sell it before it began to depreciate and bought a cheap runabout until such times I know I'll be covering far more miles.
Then its back in a V8 AMG again before we are forced in EV's forever.

But for the convenience alone I won't be without my own car.
 
I guess it’s all down to how much you like nicer cars. We all know we can get a reliable £1k car that does the job perfectly. (My sis and BIL been running £1k cars all their motoring lives). But if you’re into cars you have to accept there’s a price to pay.

My Sis & BIL think I’m mad for spending ‘silly money’ on a car. I think they’re mad for driving around in old sheds when they could easily afford £50k on a car. 🤷‍♂️
 
If we all cut back to the bare essentials in everything, then in theory we'd all have a lot more money to spend. Of course, we wouldn't spend it, because we've cut back to the bare essentials. In fact, we wouldn't all have a lot more money, because the economy would collapse if there was a drastic fall in consumer spending, and we'd be earning less or nothing.
 
does it become uneconomical to own a car?
It is no secret that my mighty C250d S205 AMG Line P P+ is not a garage or driveway queen, it is a means of transport and used as such.In the last 2 years it has covered 14k and 16k miles.
Now I see many posts where folk talk about doing in the region of 5k a year, and i wonder how that is worth owning a car?
Not a criticism,we all have our own reasons, but ignoring the convenience factor at what point does it become uneconomical to own a car with capital tied up, interest lost,interest on finance,service,fuel,tax,maintenance such as tyre and brakes etc. maybe using a £25k car?
When does using public transport or taxis become more sensible?
I think you might be addressing your question to the wrong audience, surely even the decision to buy a MB rather than a Ford, Hyundai, Vauxhall or VW ( no offence to any owners of these cars) is not a sensible one.
Buses pass my house every two hours and I have a free bus pass, I doubt very much if they'd let me bring my kayak on board. The nearest train station is 6 miles away and if a train to Cardiff takes 2 hours whereas it's just over an hour by car. So it could take on average 6 hours of travelling by bus/train and 2 hours by car.
Nearly forgot, there's no covered bus shelter so I'd get soaked as well.
 
I’ve just returned from a trip to Lapland with the family. For a change, I decided to go to and from Stansted by train and leave the car at home. Even including the taxi fare to and from Peterborough station, it worked out cheaper. All was good on the way out. The return leg, on the other hand, was fraught.

After boarding the plane at Rovaniemi airport we had to wait a long time for the wings to be de-iced. Then when we finally got to roar along the runway the pilot applied reverse thrust and brought us to a halt yards from the end. Four hours later than scheduled, after engineers squirted WD40 into the engines while we all sat on Ryanair’s rock solid plane seats, we took of.

Arriving very late at Stansted meant a much reduced train service to Peterborough, so lots more hanging around. Our relief of finally boarding a home-bound train was short lived when an announcement greeted us with the news that a shortage of train drivers meant that our Birmingham-bound train would terminate at Cambridge.

Alternative train routes were nonsensical at night with kids, so we had to take an expensive taxi home from Cambridge.

That’s why I prefer my ‘uneconomical car’ that only covers around 5k miles a year.
 
I would think that even just using taxis for a couple of thousand miles a year would cost me more than my total annual car spend on my vehicle. Bus or train I here you say?....absolutely no way I say back! Even if i could abide public transport it cannot and nor could it ever get close to the convenience of my own car on my own drive....ready at at my disposal 24 hrs a day and able to take me exactly where I need to go rather than some grubby station or bus stop somewhere vaguely in the area! Not to mention public transport is a complete joke anywhere outside the major cities.....something city dwellers seem to universally not understand. Cars all the way for me until there is a viable alternative.....so that's never then!
 
Hi TC350 , really sorry to read about your recent experience.

I have given up with public transport in the West Midlands conurbation and have been in constant communication with my local MP regarding transport issues.

Great Malvern is serviced by two service providers First Great Western and West Midlands trains , both are unreliable thus useless.At the weekends the waiting room is locked.

First Midland Red provide our intercity bus services but cannot keep to a time table !

Locally I now walk.

In Portugal you can set your watch to our local train and bus services provider.
 
I’ve just returned from a trip to Lapland with the family. For a change, I decided to go to and from Stansted by train and leave the car at home. Even including the taxi fare to and from Peterborough station, it worked out cheaper. All was good on the way out. The return leg, on the other hand, was fraught.

After boarding the plane at Rovaniemi airport we had to wait a long time for the wings to be de-iced. Then when we finally got to roar along the runway the pilot applied reverse thrust and brought us to a halt yards from the end. Four hours later than scheduled, after engineers squirted WD40 into the engines while we all sat on Ryanair’s rock solid plane seats, we took of.

Arriving very late at Stansted meant a much reduced train service to Peterborough, so lots more hanging around. Our relief of finally boarding a home-bound train was short lived when an announcement greeted us with the news that a shortage of train drivers meant that our Birmingham-bound train would terminate at Cambridge.

Alternative train routes were nonsensical at night with kids, so we had to take an expensive taxi home from Cambridge.

That’s why I prefer my ‘uneconomical car’ that only covers around 5k miles a year.
I’ll bet it was well worth the travel horror to see the main man though eh? 😊🥳👍👏
 

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