Why we remember

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Harrythedog

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On September 7th 1920, in strictest secrecy four unidentified British bodies were exhumed from temporary battlefield cemeteries at Ypres, Arras, the Asine and the Somme. None of the soldiers who did the digging were told why. The bodies were taken by field ambulance to GHQ at St-Pol-sur-Ternoise. There the bodies were draped with the Union Flag. Sentries were posted and Brigadier-General Wyatt and a Colonel Gell selected one body at Random. A French honour guard was selected, who stood by the coffin overnight. In the morning of the 8th a specially designed coffin made of oak from the grounds of Hampton Court was brought and the Unknown Warrior placed inside. On top was placed a Crusaders Sword and a shield on which was inscribed 'A British Warrior who fell in the Great War 1914-1918 For King and Country'. On the 9th of November the Unknown Warrior was taken by horse drawn carriage through Guards of Honour and the sound of tolling bells and bugle calls to the Quayside. There it was saluted by Marechal Foche and loaded onto HMS Verdun bound for Dover.....The coffin stood on the deck covered in wreaths and surrounded by the French Honour Guard. On arrival at Dover the the Unknown Warrior was greeted with a 19 gun salute, normally only reserved for field marshals. He then traveled by special train to Victoria station London. He stayed there overnight and on the morning of the 11th of November he was taken to Westminster Abbey. The Idea of the Unknown Soldier was thought of by a Padre called David Railton who had served at the front during the Great War and it was the Union Flag he used as an altar cloth at the front, that had been draped over the coffin. The intention was that all relatives of the 517,773 combatants whose bodies had not been identified could believe that the Unknown Warrior could very well be their lost Husband, Father, Brother or Son.... Every year on the 11th of November remember the Unknown Warrior...

LEST WE FORGET!
WE SHALL REMEMBER!
 
I am an RAF veteran, and am honoured to be taking part in our church service later this morning, delivering the ‘at the going down…’ words either side of the 2 minutes silence.

My service was during a time of peace, thankfully.
 
I've never served but respect those that have. Had a boys trip to some of the WW1 battlefields and cemeteries a fair few years ago, surprised my self by filling up with tears at the futility of it all.
RIP the unknown soldier, this civilian will never forget!
 
Just watched the March Past at the Cenotaph, Stephen Flynn the Westminster Leader of the SNP, couldn't have looked more Bored at having to Lay a Wreath at the Memorial, and he stayed silent when the National Anthem was sung!:mad::wallbash::wallbash:
 
Just watched the March Past at the Cenotaph, Stephen Flynn the Westminster Leader of the SNP, couldn't have looked more Bored at having to Lay a Wreath at the Memorial, and he stayed silent when the National Anthem was sung!:mad::wallbash::wallbash:

Yes, I remarked on that to Mrs Swotty.
Still, hopefully at the next election the SNP will return to insignificance.
What also annoyed me was Bliar turning up.
 
On September 7th 1920, in strictest secrecy four unidentified British bodies were exhumed from temporary battlefield cemeteries at Ypres, Arras, the Asine and the Somme. None of the soldiers who did the digging were told why. The bodies were taken by field ambulance to GHQ at St-Pol-sur-Ternoise. There the bodies were draped with the Union Flag. Sentries were posted and Brigadier-General Wyatt and a Colonel Gell selected one body at Random. A French honour guard was selected, who stood by the coffin overnight. In the morning of the 8th a specially designed coffin made of oak from the grounds of Hampton Court was brought and the Unknown Warrior placed inside. On top was placed a Crusaders Sword and a shield on which was inscribed 'A British Warrior who fell in the Great War 1914-1918 For King and Country'. On the 9th of November the Unknown Warrior was taken by horse drawn carriage through Guards of Honour and the sound of tolling bells and bugle calls to the Quayside. There it was saluted by Marechal Foche and loaded onto HMS Verdun bound for Dover.....The coffin stood on the deck covered in wreaths and surrounded by the French Honour Guard. On arrival at Dover the the Unknown Warrior was greeted with a 19 gun salute, normally only reserved for field marshals. He then traveled by special train to Victoria station London. He stayed there overnight and on the morning of the 11th of November he was taken to Westminster Abbey. The Idea of the Unknown Soldier was thought of by a Padre called David Railton who had served at the front during the Great War and it was the Union Flag he used as an altar cloth at the front, that had been draped over the coffin. The intention was that all relatives of the 517,773 combatants whose bodies had not been identified could believe that the Unknown Warrior could very well be their lost Husband, Father, Brother or Son.... Every year on the 11th of November remember the Unknown Warrior...

LEST WE FORGET!
WE SHALL REMEMBER!

Thanks for that, HtD.

Dad was in the RAF Regiment when it was formed in 1942 and later fought at Imphal and in the supply of reinforcements to Kohima. He survived, but with what we now know as ptsd. An uncle was evacuated from Dunkirk and then wounded on the beach at the Normandy landings. I'm sure many on here have similar family stories.

Lest we forget.
 

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