Workshop safety - kids

Discussion in 'OT (OFF Topic) Forums' started by CCAALLVVIINN, Feb 10, 2017.

  1. CCAALLVVIINN

    CCAALLVVIINN MB Enthusiast

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    Am after advice regarding the safety of a new home workshop I am building

    The workshop is going to contain some pretty dangerous tools, table saw, chop saw band saw etc.

    I am putting a stable door on it so as my 7 and 8 year old can't get in but can attract my attention when I'm working in there

    My worry is the girls getting in there and pressing buttons, they are very sensible children but better to be safe than sorry

    The garage can be isolated from the fuse board in the house, but I was wondering if there was a timer cutout that could be put in to the circuit somewhere that would cut the power automatically if I forget to turn it off and lock the door

    I await your thoughts
     
  2. camerafodder

    camerafodder MB Enthusiast

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    I grew up with all this sort of stuff and managed to retain my fingers. I think education is the primary thing along with a lock on the door.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2017
  3. renault12ts

    renault12ts MB Club Veteran

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    A padlocked isolator switch.

    When you remove the padlock you then padlock the door to the room...you can'
    t forget the isolator because you must remove the lock from the door when you want to leave...and then set the switch.

    Cumbersome, but (almost) foolproof.
     
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  4. DrFeelgood

    DrFeelgood MB Enthusiast

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    My mate Dave (really) wasn't so lucky, he lost half a finger.

    His favourite trick used to be to hold his hand up and ask to borrow four and a half quid.
     
  5. Dryce

    Dryce MB Enthusiast

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    I'd suggest contacts on the door and a sounder that is powered when the bench is powered.

    If the door is opened while you are in the workshop and the bench is powered then you (a) get warning somebody is approaching and (b) if you leave and the bench is powered you get a warning.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    CCAALLVVIINN

    CCAALLVVIINN MB Enthusiast

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    You're not really understanding my question
     
  7. MercedesDriver

    MercedesDriver MB Enthusiast

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    And safety switch located high enough so the kids can't reach it or locked in cupboard. There are also advanced versions with id card scan but I think that locked main power switch should be sufficient.
     
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  8. MercedesDriver

    MercedesDriver MB Enthusiast

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  9. Darrell

    Darrell MB Enthusiast

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    My brother has got 3 kids under the age of 11 and has a workshop full of electronic nasties and no injuries so far.
    Education is the key here and also the fact that (according to kids) that machines are boring. Snapchat, instagram etc etc are better.
     
  10. Meldrew2

    Meldrew2 MB Enthusiast

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    The stable door could be connected to a sensor that when the door is opened triggers a latching "stop" control that interrupts the sockets which is reset by a control which is either out of reach, key operated or both. Do not allow the lighting to be interrupted.

    If you forget to secure the stable door, opening it will cut off the power to tools. Likewise, leaving the workshop will isolate the sockets automatically.

    Im concerned about a stable door- they can be climbed over. I would suggest a door with a mesh panel instead.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2017
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  11. OP
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    CCAALLVVIINN

    CCAALLVVIINN MB Enthusiast

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    That's a simple solution, I think I'll go with it, thank you
     
  12. davidjpowell

    davidjpowell MB Enthusiast

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    I think so much depends on the kids. My daughter I would be happy with the basic prevention. My nephews who push the rules wherever they can - that padlock seem's like a good idea...
     
  13. Stratman

    Stratman MB Enthusiast

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    I'm not sure I'd want to be in a room of sharp spinning things with the door locked, that's if I correctly understand the proposed solution.

    Seconds wasted kicking in the door is more claret on the floor.
     
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  14. st13phil

    st13phil MB Enthusiast

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    Fine until someone needs emergency access because you have injured yourself, and you're locked in.

    If you wish you could implement a simple power circuit that requires the door to be closed to be "on", but unexpected stopping of machinery when someone opens the door can have unintended consequences too.

    My personal view is that you can try to get too clever with something like this and box yourself into a problem if you haven't thought through all potential scenarios. If you do want to get (more) clever then perhaps:

    1. Start with education, impressing on the kids that the machinery is potentially dangerous
    2. Install a global e-stop system so that hitting any e-stop button in the room cuts power to all machinery. That way, if something does go wrong everything can be isolated quickly
    3. Have the door to the room interlocked and on a powered shoot bolt so that if the room is "live" the door is locked, but if power is cut the door opens
    4. Include an e-stop button outside the room too. In an emergency, hitting that will power everything off and allow access
    For proper safety it should all be dual circuit, properly designed so that fault masking can't occur, and the interlocks mustn't daisy-chained - which is where things start to get a bit ridiculous for a home workshop :crazy:
     
  15. Yugguy

    Yugguy MB Enthusiast

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    Just talk to them. I have all my weights set up in my garage, with some heavy stuff that could hurt a kid if they messed with it. From an early age my daughter knew never to touch them without me being there.
     
  16. camerafodder

    camerafodder MB Enthusiast

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    Indeed, my suggestion of a simple lock was to use when no-one was in there.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2017
  17. camerafodder

    camerafodder MB Enthusiast

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    I do understand. I was simply offering a simple pragmatic approach based on my own personal experience. :)
     
  18. brucemillar

    brucemillar MB Enthusiast

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    A very sensible question to ask. Thank you.

    The best manual safety switches (irrespective of application) are the ones that pull out, as opposed to push in. This avoids accidental tripping in the event that you have deliberately activated the switch to turn off the huge, ugly spinning saw that you are now being extricated from. You do not want a rescuer to trip and fall against the switch, starting everything up again!!

    You now want to go the extra mile and get one, that either comes in a box with a spring loaded flap/cover and ensure that it is fitted so the the flap opens upwards!!

    Pull switches are normally spring loaded and require a fair force and a bit of (do I want to do this) thought, to pull them out. This gets by, the natural inclination of most children and ALL males to, push the DO NOT PUSH button.

    Education is paramount and can never be underestimated (I know, that you know this). The more we label "Do Not Touch" the more the temptation will grow to touch. Yes I do this for a living....

    If it were me.... I would do the above. Then only have it on when I am in the room/workshop. Not 100% but nothing is.
     
  19. renault12ts

    renault12ts MB Club Veteran

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    Do your daughter's friends also know this?
     
  20. Pontoneer

    Pontoneer Hardcore MB Enthusiast

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    I'd have though a simple 'emergency stop' push button near the door would cover the most likely emergency : that of you being injured using the kit . A secondary , key operated switch , to prevent unauthorised use in your absence , could be wired in series .

    The 'stable door' , to keep kids out , should not be too obstructive in case anyone needs in to help you in the event of an accident , but could itself trigger a bright strobe , rather than an audible alarm ( which might be masked by machinery noise ) so that you are alerted if anyone opens it .
     

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