Disabling Adblue/NOx Sensors via Vediamo or Xentry

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Speedy55

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2022
Messages
36
Location
Worcestershire
Car
W212 E220CDI Avantgarde
Hi Guys,
I have 2015 W212 E220 with OM651.
Is it possible to disable AdBlue Level Meter sensor and/or NOx sensors via Vediamo or Xentry?

I'm so bored. Either I see NOx sensor error or AdBlue malfunction error every 2-3 months. I replaced both NOx sensors and recoded via Xentry. Deleted all errors. (NOx sensors are genuine MB btw)

Then a few miles later I saw the engine light on my dashboard. I scanned on Xentry and I could see only stored errors, no current error codes. I cleared the fault codes and popped up a couple of days later.

Now, I'd like to disable AdBlue and NOx sensors via software.

Is it possible? Appreciate your suggestions.

Thanks,
 
'AdBlue Delete' is obviously possible, but I don't personally know what's involved.

But are you sure that you want to keep the car? AdBlue Delete and DPF gutting are both ticking time bombs - when the DVSA (and insurance companies) will finally get smart about these mods there will be very many people out there with unsellable cars that they can't give away - you don't want to be one of them.......
 
Nox levels will be part of the MOT soon.... no EGR or AdBlue will almost certainly mean a fail.
 
@markjay tbh, I don't know if Adblue delete and disabling sensors are the same things.

I know, DPF and/or AdBlue deleting is not legit in the UK.

I was just planning to disable the sensors during my ownership as it's annoying :(
I am not planning to sell my car after deleting/disabling AdBlue.

At least, I wanna drive it without NOx or AdBlue alerts for another year or two :)

Thanks,
 
I can't see how they'd introduce NOx and PM testing at MOT. Measuring at idle wouldn't be sufficient, so it would mean all stations would need a dynamometer as well the gas analysers.
 
I can't see how they'd introduce NOx and PM testing at MOT. Measuring at idle wouldn't be sufficient, so it would mean all stations would need a dynamometer as well the gas analysers.
There already NOx analysers on the market...and most EGRs are only open at idle and just above....and not at all under heavy load... which is why when they fail jammed open or partiallyI open you lose power at higher revs.... no dyno needed.

Googled..

To help minimize NO the EGR valve allows a precise quantity of exhaust gas to re-enter the intake the system, effectively changing the chemical makeup of the air entering the engine. With less oxygen, the now diluted mixture burns slower, lowering temperatures in the combustion chamber by almost 150°C, and reducing NOx production for a cleaner, more efficient exhaust.

The EGR valve has two primary settings: open and closed, although the position can vary anywhere in between. The EGR valve is closed when the engine is starting up. During idle and at low speeds, only a small amount of power is required, and therefore only a small amount of oxygen, so the valve gradually opens – it can be up to 90% open at idle. However as more torque and power is required, for example during full acceleration, the EGR valve closes to ensure as much oxygen enters the cylinder.

As well are reducing NOx, EGR valves can be used in downsized GDi engines to reduce pumping losses and improve both combustion efficiency and knock tolerance. In diesel, it can also help to reduce diesel knock at idle.
 
I know nothing about AdBlue (because I’ve never owned a diesel), but I’ve suffered the NOx sensor warnings enough to have learnt about them. When you say “disable the NOx sensors”, do you mean just that or do you mean disable the NOx sensor warning codes? I had the latter done several years ago after the third lot of sensor replacements. All was good for a year or so, then another sensor fault code popped up. Who knew there was more than one fault code?

I cancelled that code with my cheap OBD scanner, but it popped up again a few weeks later. After repeating the process a couple of times, the software gave up trying to persuade me to spend >£1k on more new sensors. Over a year later, it tried again so I repeated the cancelling process - and it gave up again. I’m now resigned to spending around ten minutes cancelling DTCs every year or so instead of the hassle and expense of getting sensors replaced.
 
There already NOx analysers on the market...and most EGRs are only open at idle and just above....and not at all under heavy load... which is why when they fail jammed open or partiallyI open you lose power at higher revs.... no dyno needed.

Googled..

To help minimize NO the EGR valve allows a precise quantity of exhaust gas to re-enter the intake the system, effectively changing the chemical makeup of the air entering the engine. With less oxygen, the now diluted mixture burns slower, lowering temperatures in the combustion chamber by almost 150°C, and reducing NOx production for a cleaner, more efficient exhaust.

The EGR valve has two primary settings: open and closed, although the position can vary anywhere in between. The EGR valve is closed when the engine is starting up. During idle and at low speeds, only a small amount of power is required, and therefore only a small amount of oxygen, so the valve gradually opens – it can be up to 90% open at idle. However as more torque and power is required, for example during full acceleration, the EGR valve closes to ensure as much oxygen enters the cylinder.

As well are reducing NOx, EGR valves can be used in downsized GDi engines to reduce pumping losses and improve both combustion efficiency and knock tolerance. In diesel, it can also help to reduce diesel knock at idle.
This thread was about SCR, not EGR.
SCR doesn't really do much at idle, so testing NOx at idle won't tell you much about it's efficacy.

Sure there are analysers to test NOx and parts, but those don't come cheap. So if MOT stations had to install those, they wouldn't be happy. Then, to test properly vehicle needs to be under load, so that means testing on the road or a dyno. Either way, that's a big change for test stations.

That info about EGR is a little out of date. Cooled EGR allows it to be used across a bigger operating range, not just around idle.
Low pressure EGR used by quite a few Eu6 marques, in addition to HP EGR, allows use across an ever wider operating range.
 

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