I had an inspection today at work ..... EV charging points was on the report!

Page may contain affiliate links. Please see terms for details.
Because the EV fanboys are presenting a fantasy world which doesn't exist in real life?
More likely that Accountants are “saving money” without understanding the business, surely?

Postman Pat is an ideal application for first gen EV vans, but that doesn’t mean it’s for all and sundry yet.

.
 
...What’s the score with all of that. The higher the kW the quicker the charge and then no doubt the price?

Yes. However, each model of car has its own max charging rate, and so opting for a charger that has a higher capacity than what your car can take is pointless, because the charging speed will always be limited to the lowest of the two (the charger's capacity or the card's maximum charging rate).
 
Talking of which, I saw today that MB World at Weybridge has FREE 50kwh chargers (2 hours only - for use by anyone who rocks up)

Are they any good?

View attachment 149831

There are three 50kW chargers at our local Aldi and they are also free for all (i.e. not even limited to Aldi shoppers).
 
More likely that Accountants are “saving money” without understanding the business, surely?

Postman Pat is an ideal application for first gen EV vans, but that doesn’t mean it’s for all and sundry yet.

.
 
More likely that Accountants are “saving money” without understanding the business, surely?

Postman Pat is an ideal application for first gen EV vans, but that doesn’t mean it’s for all and sundry yet.

.
I don't think so, I worked in the utility industry where our diesel vans had PTO's ( power take off units) which provided air compressors and electric generators run from the diesel engine while stationary at work sites. I've always wondered how an electric vehicle could provide this after driving to the site, working all day and still driving home after work. I don't think it's possible. How will all the emergency services operate when called on to work long hours and relying on batteries? I suspect diesel engines still have many uses that batteries will never compete with!
 
I don't think so, I worked in the utility industry where our diesel vans had PTO's ( power take off units) which provided air compressors and electric generators run from the diesel engine while stationary at work sites. I've always wondered how an electric vehicle could provide this after driving to the site, working all day and still driving home after work. I don't think it's possible. How will all the emergency services operate when called on to work long hours and relying on batteries? I suspect diesel engines still have many uses that batteries will never compete with!

I had similar toughts, firstly when I saw Tesco delivery vans, I was wondering how can the battery provide power for refrigeration AND for driving around all day, then when I saw the the Council's rubbish lorries, I wondered how the battery can power the compactor at every stop AND the truck itself.

My guess is that in spite of being on the road for hours on end, the actual mileage driven by these vehicles is actually very low.
 
Pen

Pentagon

So it was a business lease deal? And the finance provider agreed to take the vehicles back before the end of the lease agreement period?
 


They’re a total shit-show of a business.
 
There are three 50kW chargers at our local Aldi and they are also free for all (i.e. not even limited to Aldi shoppers).
For sure, my badly worded question was more around whether they actually deliver close to 50kwh and whether people use them.

OK, it is a reminder that ‘“normal” people routinely get 300+ miles of travel for free by dropping into MB World for a coffee or a meeting. (That’s more than two weeks driving for half the drivers on UK roads)
 
I don't think so, I worked in the utility industry where our diesel vans had PTO's ( power take off units) which provided air compressors and electric generators run from the diesel engine while stationary at work sites. I've always wondered how an electric vehicle could provide this after driving to the site, working all day and still driving home after work. I don't think it's possible. How will all the emergency services operate when called on to work long hours and relying on batteries? I suspect diesel engines still have many uses that batteries will never compete with!
Read my comment again and think about what I said.

Postman Pat is doing 20-40 miles per day local, usually with return to base.

The tax man ( and you, the tax payer) gives an enormous tax break to EV van owners which must be tempting to Accountants but not to Transport Managers, who know that sometimes daily use can be much higher than average daily use.

You’re right about the Emergency Services needing the ability to add diesel. That’s why, like HGV haulage, they’ve never been part of the BEV changeover. (Although that’s no reason not to put a routine, local non-fast response, Plod or GP into a BEV with a 300 mile range)
 
Last edited:
That’s why, like HGV haulage, they’ve never been part of the BEV changeover
I think you will find they are....from .Gov

"“For HGVs, that is 2035 for everything under 26 tonnes and by 2040, all HGVs that are sold will need to be zero-emission.”
 
I think you will find they are....from .Gov

"“For HGVs, that is 2035 for everything under 26 tonnes and by 2040, all HGVs that are sold will need to be zero-emission.”
Isn’t this about the change to Hydrogen rather than BEV ?
 


They’re a total shit-show of a busine
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top Bottom