Pot hole damage/insurance write off

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As said, Cat N does not need an inspection.

The term "write off" I is rather misleading.

It is really just uneconomical to repair to the standard that the insurance company would need to meet. That doesn't mean that the vehicle cannot be repaired safely and to a high standard by other means such as reclaimed parts and using smaller repair facilities with lower costs.
I did say I wasn't sure about Cat N. However, found elsewhere:

What is Cat S and Cat N damage?​

A Cat S car is one which has sustained structural damage – think of items integral to the car's structure such as the chassis and suspension. While Cat S cars can safely be repaired and put back on the road, they must be re-registered with the DVLA.


Cat N classification encompasses damage to all non-structural damage, such as body panels, lights, and electrical systems. As with Cat S cars, Cat N vehicles can be put back on the road but they do not need to be re-registered with the DVLA – though you will still need to inform the DVLA your car has been written-off in the first place.

In effect, Cat N and Cat S replace the old Cat D and Cat C categories respectively, albeit with modifications to their remits.

What does Cat S and Cat N damage mean?​

The write-off categories are intended to reflect the type of damage sustained by a car that caused it to be written off. Knowing this information will go some way towards helping a future buyer understand what to look for when inspecting the car. Knowing that a car was previously structurally damaged is particularly important as poor repairs can be easier to hide from all but the most thorough of inspections
 
I did say I wasn't sure about Cat N. However, found elsewhere:

What is Cat S and Cat N damage?​

A Cat S car is one which has sustained structural damage – think of items integral to the car's structure such as the chassis and suspension. While Cat S cars can safely be repaired and put back on the road, they must be re-registered with the DVLA.


Cat N classification encompasses damage to all non-structural damage, such as body panels, lights, and electrical systems. As with Cat S cars, Cat N vehicles can be put back on the road but they do not need to be re-registered with the DVLA – though you will still need to inform the DVLA your car has been written-off in the first place.

In effect, Cat N and Cat S replace the old Cat D and Cat C categories respectively, albeit with modifications to their remits.

What does Cat S and Cat N damage mean?​

The write-off categories are intended to reflect the type of damage sustained by a car that caused it to be written off. Knowing this information will go some way towards helping a future buyer understand what to look for when inspecting the car. Knowing that a car was previously structurally damaged is particularly important as poor repairs can be easier to hide from all but the most thorough of inspections
Aware of all of that.

As said, the term "write-off" is misleading and misunderstood by many.
 
They have offered £13500 but I would reall like to keep the car as it’s the last ‘Phase 2’ R230 registered March 09 and I really enjoy driving it and the look.
Is their offer reasonable though? I've lost track of the prices for facelift R230's. As Chris Edu says above it can be easier and less stressful to accept a reasonable settlement and buy another, although you may have to be patient for a similar one to come up.
 
Is their offer reasonable though? I've lost track of the prices for facelift R230's. As Chris Edu says above it can be easier and less stressful to accept a reasonable settlement and buy another, although you may have to be patient for a similar one to come up.
Thanks for the input oldguy57
 

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