EGR system removal.

Page may contain affiliate links. Please see terms for details.
They want to both test NOx tail pipe and the performance of the NOx control systems on the car at the same time .

So it's going to be a while .
 
The main benefit of removing the EGR is that you are not recycling dirty exhaust gases back through the inlet manifold and cylinders this is what causes the build up of the black gunk that restricts the air flow
I find it extraordinary that after spending so much effort over the years in removing exhaust gasses from the combustion chamber as efficiently and quickly as possible, (bigger valves, more valves, polished exhaust ports, freeflow exhaust systems etc), someone has come up with the hair brain idea of putting them back in. :D
 
I find it extraordinary that some buy a Mercedes than skimp on the maintenance and - best of all - believe that they know better than the engineers who designed it. Staggering ignorance. Staggering, but it just wont die.
 
EGR is closed at idle anyway, it’s only open at partial throttle. So all MOT stations would need a rolling road or road test equipment. Seems unlikely.

I find it extraordinary that after spending so much effort over the years in removing exhaust gasses from the combustion chamber as efficiently and quickly as possible, (bigger valves, more valves, polished exhaust ports, freeflow exhaust systems etc), someone has come up with the hair brain idea of putting them back in. :D

Yes, once you do a little reading on all of the emissions, contraptions that are bolted on to a turbo, diesel engine, you realise that it’s actually a pretty stupid method of transporting small vehicles. I say that as a diesel owner…
 
Not true.... Google EGR.

The EGR valve is closed when the engine is starting up. During idle and at low speeds, only a small amount of power is required, and therefore only a small amount of oxygen, so the valve gradually opens – it can be up to 90% open at idle.
 
Last edited:
The volatility of the oil contributes to carbon build up. Buy your oil on price and this is what you get.
Its not just using cheap oil! even if using bmw ll04 approved oil you still get carbon build up in the inlet system its not possible to have clean induction manifold and inlet ports when sending untreated exhaust gasses through them end of! regardless of quality of oil used
 
Last edited:
Its not just using cheap oil! even if using bmw ll04 approved oil you still get carbon build up in the inlet system its not possible to have clean induction manifold and inlet ports when sending untreated exhaust gasses through them end of regardless of quality of oil used
There are oils that are low volatility (extended drain interval oils - that have to have low volatility) but you won't trip over them in the usual outlets. Because of that. it's unlikely that you've encountered them. I'm not saying they can eliminate the carbonisation - but they go along way to preventing it.
Alternatively. AlfaItalia's catch tank sounds like a reasonable method to keep carbonisation at bay.
 
There are oils that are low volatility (extended drain interval oils - that have to have low volatility) but you won't trip over them in the usual outlets. Because of that. it's unlikely that you've encountered them. I'm not saying they can eliminate the carbonisation - but they go along way to preventing it.
Alternatively. AlfaItalia's catch tank sounds like a reasonable method to keep carbonisation at bay.
Alfatalias oil catch tank is connected to the closed crankcase breather system to prevent blowing the crankshaft seals by build up of crankcase pressure that is there on Turbocharged engines! totally different problem to EGR valve sending exhaust gasses back through the induction system
 
Alfatalias oil catch tank is connected to the closed crankcase breather system to prevent blowing the crankshaft seals by build up of crankcase pressure that is there on Turbocharged engines! totally different problem to EGR valve sending exhaust gasses back through the induction system
The crankcase ventilation system routes the crankcase vapours to the inlet manifold where it finds and mixes with EGR. Eliminate one or the other and the carbonisation problem ceases. Only one can be eliminated legally - and it aint the EGR.
 
The crankcase ventilation system routes the crankcase vapours to the inlet manifold where it finds and mixes with EGR. Eliminate one or the other and the carbonisation problem ceases. Only one can be eliminated legally - and it aint the EGR.
Wrong you obviously dont understand how crankcase breather system works especially on turbo charged engines running high boost pressures again the catch tank idea is to prevent blowwing the seals on the cranckase and block it catches the oil vapour that as been forced past the piston rings which is not dirty contaminated exhaust gases from the EGR
 
Alfatalias oil catch tank is connected to the closed crankcase breather system to prevent blowing the crankshaft seals by build up of crankcase pressure that is there on Turbocharged engines! totally different problem to EGR valve sending exhaust gasses back through the induction system
Wrong
The crankcase ventilation system routes the crankcase vapours to the inlet manifold where it finds and mixes with EGR. Eliminate one or the other and the carbonisation problem ceases. Only one can be eliminated legally - and it aint the EGR.
Right
Wrong you obviously dont understand how crankcase breather system works especially on turbo charged engines running high boost pressures again the catch tank idea is to prevent blowwing the seals on the cranckase and block it catches the oil vapour that as been forced past the piston rings which is not dirty contaminated exhaust gases from the EGR
Wrong.
 
LOL....I was a car mechanic for a living!!.....so I understand a bit!!. And I've had the EGR and PVC and swirl flaps apart on my car and others more than a few times. But obviously I bow to your superior qualifications and knowledge.....Oh hang on a bit....no....I dont!


I'm out and leave you kids to it!!
 
LOL....I was a car mechanic for a living!!.....so I understand a bit!!. And I've had the EGR and PVC and swirl flaps apart on my car and others more than a few times. But obviously I bow to your superior qualifications and knowledge.....Oh hang on a bit....no....I dont!


I'm out and leave you kids to it!!
Don't forget the time spent selling used cars too!! im sure that you were a well qualified motor mechanic i dont think! where was it Halfords?
 
Just for your info....it was first a indie car garage...then a main Audi/VW dealer....the same one I later become a salesman and then sales manager at.....and it was mainly new cars as we didn't have a lot of space for used.. I still do the odd paid spannering job now....but not so much as I don't like working (and risking oil) on my new drive!....and my knees are not what they were....so it only friends and relatives now.

....after that correction...I'm really out!! :)
 
Just for your info....it was first a indie car garage...then a main Audi/VW dealer....the same one I later become a salesman and then sales manager at.....and it was mainly new cars as we didn't have a lot of space for used.. I still do the odd paid spannering job now....but not so much as I don't like working (and risking oil) on my new drive!....and my knees are not what they were....so it only friends and relatives now.

....after that correction...I'm really out!! :)
Ha Ha:banana: Got yer!!!!!!!!!
 
I find it extraordinary that after spending so much effort over the years in removing exhaust gasses from the combustion chamber as efficiently and quickly as possible, (bigger valves, more valves, polished exhaust ports, freeflow exhaust systems etc), someone has come up with the hair brain idea of putting them back in. :D
I don't think that you are quite getting the concept.

Efficient extraction of exhaust gases for improved cylinder filling is not the same as lowering the levels of pollutants by recycling gases to ensure more complete combustion.
 
Last edited:

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top Bottom