Locked keys in boot c220 w204

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Hi , on my car I left the keys in the boot by mistake and the boot refused to close.

I was then looking for the keys and found them in the boot , removed the keys and the boot closed and locked !!
 
This is a friend of mines car, he locked his keys in the boot, a locksmith came out and gained entry to the car but was unable to gain access to the boot (no button to open). Breakdown came out and the only option was to cut the parcel shelf and fish the keys out.

Was there any other way this could have been done?

There was references to pulling fuses or disconnecting the battery.
I did this to mine. The solution was to open the door using a spare skeleton key I happened to have. The the AA bloke took out one of the after market parcel shelf speakers. He then deployed a set of bent welding rods with a variety of lights and magnets to retrieve the key. Chops.
 
I did this to mine. The solution was to open the door using a spare skeleton key I happened to have. The the AA bloke took out one of the after market parcel shelf speakers. He then deployed a set of bent welding rods with a variety of lights and magnets to retrieve the key. Chops.

Why not just open the boot with the skeleton key?
 
Why not just open the boot with the skeleton key?

The skeleton key that I had would open the driver's door and glovebox but not the boot. Maybe the bootlid/lock had been replaced at some point. Dunno.
 
The skeleton key that I had would open the driver's door and glovebox but not the boot. Maybe the bootlid/lock had been replaced at some point. Dunno.

Or possibly it was seized due to lack of regular use? A bit of penetrating oil might help for next time (hopefully there won't be one).
 
Depending on the ability unlock the car with MercedesMe.

I had a 2016 E350 that I locked the keys in the boot area when in France and this saved the day.

Robin
 
BTW, on my W204, Comand UK retrofitted the boot opening button on the front speaker housing. I had it on the W203 and it made no sense not to have it on the W204.
I’ve had the boot opening button on the speaker housing on my facelift W204 from new.
 
On the subject of the 'emergency' metal blade supplied with most cars these days many will not work particularly on older cars simply because most have never been used .

First thing I did when I bought my 2006 car 5 years ago was try to use the blade.....tight as FRUCK !! had to use lube (ooh err missuss) and pliers to get the locks to eventually turn. (Same with the 2006 ex mother in law Toyota Yaris)

Not sure if testing the mechanical key blade is part of dealer service , it should be, but it's worth doing it yourself in case you ever need to use in on a dark and rainy night . It only takes a few minutes.
 
I’ve had the boot opening button on the speaker housing on my facelift W204 from new.

It wasn't a separate option as such, but it was only available with certain trim levels. I still think it's odd that such a basic feature wasn't standard for all trim levels on the C-Class.
 
On the subject of the 'emergency' metal blade supplied with most cars these days many will not work particularly on older cars simply because most have never been used .

First thing I did when I bought my 2006 car 5 years ago was try to use the blade.....tight as FRUCK !! had to use lube (ooh err missuss) and pliers to get the locks to eventually turn. (Same with the 2006 ex mother in law Toyota Yaris)

Not sure if testing the mechanical key blade is part of dealer service , it should be, but it's worth doing it yourself in case you ever need to use in on a dark and rainy night . It only takes a few minutes.

Like you I thought it would be a good idea to try the lock on my CLK. Especially as I was starting to experience the bouncing lock issue. The lock itself was very stiff and I didn't have any luck with either blade even after much lube. On examining the blade keys they don't match. So whether one or none of the keys are actually for my car I have no idea.

It's on my to-do list :rolleyes:
 
My C class doesn't even have a lock on the boot. Cabin switch or Key Fob only.
Cheap builds these Mercs!

Is it a 4-door saloon with a boot lid, or a 2-door coupe with a hatch?
 
Like you I thought it would be a good idea to try the lock on my CLK. Especially as I was starting to experience the bouncing lock issue. The lock itself was very stiff and I didn't have any luck with either blade even after much lube. On examining the blade keys they don't match. So whether one or none of the keys are actually for my car I have no idea.

This is something I've been meaning to do for the 8.5 years I've owned my W204 so I've just been out to the garage and tried the key for the first time. It opened both the drivers door and the boot with no stiffness and I didn't use any lube. The boot lock is hidden in the number plate recess. I doubt the locks have seen any lubrication in the 14 year life of the cars so I'm inclined to leave them alone while they work and perhaps exercise them at every annual service - if I remember.

That's one box ticked. today The other thing I don't do near often enough is check the pressure in the spare wheel. The spacesavers run at double the normal pressure so they tend to deflate over time. Sure enough it was down to 45 psi. Another box ticked.
 

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