Can you pass this English Sats exam for 10 and 11 year olds?

lisa110rry

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10/10 but proofreading is part of my job. I did a maths one on another site and got 87.5/100 (one question wrong) through a stupid mistake while the phone was ringing. Calculations are another big part of my job.

I feel I could pass an English Language A level (I was not educated in the UK so never took one when young) but in no way could I consider a Maths A Level.
 

Happytalk73

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3/10 for me.

Not ashamed one little bit. I'm a good Dad & Hubby and loving life. :bannana:

Ant. :D
 

ChrisEdu

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I had a look at this year's maths test today and didn't think it was too bad, if anything, it wouldn't stretch the children that used to sit the level 6 papers.

Apparently, the SPAG test wasn't as bad as that example, but the comprehension paper caused some difficulties.
 

Red C220

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I had a look at this year's maths test today and didn't think it was too bad, if anything, it wouldn't stretch the children that used to sit the level 6 papers.

Apparently, the SPAG test wasn't as bad as that example, but the comprehension paper caused some difficulties.

The biggest problem I had with the Maths paper is I didn't understand much of
he terminology used. I have no idea what Factors are. Also I've never seen division done in the way it's taught these days.

Add to this I can't operate my step daughters calculator which apparently does fractions.

I do find the political correctness of the questions comical though.
 
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Red C220

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I thought my 4/10 would be a low I'm delighted to see I'm at least 1 mark less daft than some other members.
 

ChrisEdu

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The biggest problem I had with the Maths paper is I didn't understand much of
he terminology used. I have no idea what Factors are. Also I've never seen division done in the way it's taught these days.

Add to this I can't operate my step daughters calculator which apparently does fractions.

I do find the political correctness of the questions comical though.

It's fairly important that I know those things as, when not trying to kill myself, teaching it is my bread and butter. I'm a specialist teacher that is trained to work with children that struggle, although I also teach some of the more able, which makes a nice change.
 

ash59fifty-uk

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10/10 I loved English in school, science and humanities also

Funnily enough the three main ones which came with perks-

English: got to watch films, nothing beat the excitement of the teacher rolling in that old telly on the trolley

Humanities: history (being the favourite of the 3 subjects within humanities) and plenty of school trips

Science: got to officially burn and blow things up!

:thumb:
 

Happytalk73

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Well, our 10 year old daughter just got 8/10 which shows that the school work she's doing is virtually up to scratch.

I've told her they'll be no pocket money this week because she got a couple wrong! ;)

Ant.
 

MarkII

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I've always considered my command of English to be quite good but :eek: 6/10, so I passed but not in a way I'm proud of.

I can't recall ever learning about the 'active voice', or 'past progressive' for that matter but I left school a long time ago, so maybe I've forgotten. Made a simple mistake on question 9 (which I really should have got right) and I should've got question 3 right - coz it's about a 'relative' :D

Thankfully, as others have said, my less than stellar performance in that test doesn't seem to reflect my success in my working life.

My other half's a TA in Early Years and (don't tell her I said this) but her grammar and spelling are atrocious :eek:

Whilst I think it's right for language to evolve (spelling wise), the problem is that we judge children by the pre-existing 'norms' of our language, whilst all the time they're bombarded by what appears to be poor grammar and spelling from the internet and other 'un-regulated' mediums.

Presumably, to ace this test, children need to not only understand how grammar works but read books more, where the format of the grammar has (hopefully) been checked first....

BTW: If I've made gaffs in my grammar during this post - it's coz I got sicks, 'in it :D
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Also I seem to remember being 'in love' with my english teacher, so I was distracted.....
 
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oldguy57

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Ah the passage of time - going through some very old papers I came across a 40 year old degree final exam paper - absolutely unfathomable to me now.
 

ChrisEdu

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The trouble with how the English curriculum is going is that it is strangling any enjoyment and joy of reading and writing for their own sake. Children are getting so stressed about remembering all of the different constructs that their love of a good book, or enjoyment of writing a story, is almost being seen as secondary to the need to know all of this technical information that, as many have already said, has very little, if any, real world importance. Something that the government is failing to recognise is the fact that each generation changes the use of language to suit its needs and fit with the times. Unfortunately, all the while our masters are public school educated, with their perceptions coloured in a particular way, this is likely to remain the status quo. That said, I do think certain common basics, like punctuation, are important for making sense of things. Likewise, I wouldn't want to condone the use of text speak as something used in a formal setting, but it does have an important role in the modern world and shouldn't be dismissed.
 
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I got 6/10 but like most things in my life I guessed at least half of the questions and somehow managed to get a result.
 

DSM10000

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I got 6/10 but like most things in my life I guessed at least half of the questions and somehow managed to get a result.

Do not be harsh on yourself Lee, after all, English is your second language :D:D:D
 

fredT

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5 - Not native and was never keen on grammar anyhow.

Are we not wasting our and our kids time with this crap though? Yes good language skills is important but there is no need to write and talk like freakin lawyers?

What use is it to anyone to able to point out the post aggressive adverb in a sentence?

Basically I think language should take a leaf out of math's book; simple and to the point sentencing should be favoured over drawn out equations. If you know what I mean
 

E55BOF

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10/10, but I have a knack for languages, so no surprise there. I admit it was luck that I gave the correct answer to the question asking me to identify which was a preposition; it's fifty years since I needed to analyse an English sentence, and I cannot recall the definition of a preposition.

I can't recall ever hearing of a 'past progressive', but the term gives the meaning away. It may just be that the way English is taught has changed a little since I left school in 1967...
 

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Before I retired, I used to do a voluntary session once week in a local primary school in London, helping Year 6 and Year 7 kids with reading. No wonder so many of them were poor readers, if they had to spend so much time and effort learning grammatical jargon like that. I'm sure when I endured classical grammar lessons at school, we didn't go into such detail - just concentrated on rules and examples. 9/10 for me and my brain now hurts.
 

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