Definative explination.... Pull left

Page may contain affiliate links. Please see terms for details.
You could've cleaned it before taking it in ... ;)
Sadly no... :(

The wheels were refurbished last week, I thought I'd give it a couple of weeks more before washing it.

I use a local hand car wash, they're good but they will use whatever it is that they are using on the wheels.
 
Taken me till now to realise there is a WiM forum. .....my bad LOL
 
That's pretty deep stuff.
Don't forget when your N/S front tyre looses its outside edge the centre of the tyre is in a different place and can make any vehicle pull to one side.
And as mentioned the camber if the road. Find a level road or drive on the other side and try it.
I don't know about Mercedes but some cars have eletronic assist power steering have to be adjusted to be central or will be biast one way.
Ken
 
Alignment (1728 x 2304).jpg

Had mine done yesterday. It's astonishing how such small adjustments make such a large change. It's like driving a different car. The bloke did mention that the near side front caster could be adjusted using a bolt but if I was happy with the way it drives not to worry.
Anyway, thought I would share.
Cheers.
 
View attachment 84595

Had mine done yesterday. It's astonishing how such small adjustments make such a large change. It's like driving a different car. The bloke did mention that the near side front caster could be adjusted using a bolt but if I was happy with the way it drives not to worry.
Anyway, thought I would share.
Cheers.

What I don't understand is unless you change to suspension arm bolts for a cranked bolt how can it alter anything. When I changed my arms although the holes in the arms were elongated it has locating tags but straight bolts ?
Regards Ken
 
What I don't understand is unless you change to suspension arm bolts for a cranked bolt how can it alter anything. When I changed my arms although the holes in the arms were elongated it has locating tags but straight bolts ?
Regards Ken
If that's all you don't understand you're way ahead of me! I haven't had a look at said bolts....now I'm going to have to! I suspect having the bolt done will throw everything out of whack again. At the moment I'm happy with the way it goes down the road so I'm leaving well alone.
 
There are a few different types of adjuster bolts but the most common is a bolt with two grooves along its length. The bushing on the lower arm and control arm has four rails along its core, two left and two right. The bolts groves feed along one side of the rails left or right depending on what direction each angle is being corrected.
 
There are a few different types of adjuster bolts but the most common is a bolt with two grooves along its length. The bushing on the lower arm and control arm has four rails along its core, two left and two right. The bolts groves feed along one side of the rails left or right depending on what direction each angle is being corrected.
So you change the bolt?. I thought you maybe turned it but my bolts were straight so was puzzled.
 
This will give you some idea what the bolt looks like:

Genuine-Mercedes-Benz-C-E-Class-Camber-Adjustment-Bolt.jpg


And see also here:

Castor Camber/Castor Fluted Adjustment Bolts Question. - MBWorld.org Forums
 
Hi WiM, I've read this with interest. My S211 E500 regularly ends up pulling to the left. My 'man' has a hunter alignment system but I reckon that with the potholes and everything, I have to probably have an alignment done three or four times a year. My Falken FK501s were all worn on the shoulders after around 24,000 miles, as I didn't respond quickly enough to have the alignment done.

I have a couple of questions for you:

- when you align the wheels and install the grooves adjustment bolts, do you also ensure that the ride heights of the air suspension are correct?

- once installed, will my 'man' be able to make micro adjustments as and when required, or will the car still need to be brought back to you for a little 'black magic'?

I'm in SW20, so not a million miles away and am going to be swapping the summer alloys back soon, so probably an ideal time to consider your service.
 
Hi WiM, I've read this with interest. My S211 E500 regularly ends up pulling to the left. My 'man' has a hunter alignment system but I reckon that with the potholes and everything, I have to probably have an alignment done three or four times a year. My Falken FK501s were all worn on the shoulders after around 24,000 miles, as I didn't respond quickly enough to have the alignment done.

I have a couple of questions for you:

- when you align the wheels and install the grooves adjustment bolts, do you also ensure that the ride heights of the air suspension are correct?

- once installed, will my 'man' be able to make micro adjustments as and when required, or will the car still need to be brought back to you for a little 'black magic'?

I'm in SW20, so not a million miles away and am going to be swapping the summer alloys back soon, so probably an ideal time to consider your service.



Wheel alignment equipment differs between makes as to how it clamps on.
I always said that the equipment is only as good as the person using it. Someone that's keen can do a very good job on old equipment.
As your suspension goes up and down steering angles will alter a little so you would want your standard ride height. You wouldn't do a micro adjustment in between major work.
If your taking the outer edges off both front tyres your most likely towing in. If only the left its possibly roundabouts or low pressures.
I have to say on my C220 my tyres wear very smooth. When it's in a lock the wheels lean into to corner like a motorbike.
Ken
 
That's neat.
I was expecting bolts with the centre section offset.
You would think though on a normal straight car standard bolts should be ok.
I changed all arms in mine and had it aligned and the steering is spot on.
Not sure what you mean by "a normal straight car"... If the camber of the front wheel is within the MB spec, then there's no need for an adjustable bolt. It is only needed on a wheel where the camber is out of the permitted range. The only way to accurately measure the camber these days is on a wheel alignment machine (I don't believe anyone is still using the mechanic camber measuring tools of old). The effect of a misaligned suspension can be unequal tyre wear, or increased load (and wear) on suspension components, and change of driving characteristics. With regards the latter, Tony Bones at WIM can advise - e.g. if you want to tune the suspension for sharper steering response or better straight-line stability at high speed etc. That said, many drivers won't notice a misaligned suspension, as long as the tyres don't seem to be wearing abnormally.
 
Not sure what you mean by "a normal straight car"... If the camber of the front wheel is within the MB spec, then there's no need for an adjustable bolt. It is only needed on a wheel where the camber is out of the permitted range. The only way to accurately measure the camber these days is on a wheel alignment machine (I don't believe anyone is still using the mechanic camber measuring tools of old). The effect of a misaligned suspension can be unequal tyre wear, or increased load (and wear) on suspension components, and change of driving characteristics. With regards the latter, Tony Bones at WIM can advise - e.g. if you want to tune the suspension for sharper steering response or better straight-line stability at high speed etc. That said, many drivers won't notice a misaligned suspension, as long as the tyres don't seem to be wearing abnormally.
Not sure what you mean by "a normal straight car"... If the camber of the front wheel is within the MB spec, then there's no need for an adjustable bolt. It is only needed on a wheel where the camber is out of the permitted range. The only way to accurately measure the camber these days is on a wheel alignment machine (I don't believe anyone is still using the mechanic camber measuring tools of old). The effect of a misaligned suspension can be unequal tyre wear, or increased load (and wear) on suspension components, and change of driving characteristics. With regards the latter, Tony Bones at WIM can advise - e.g. if you want to tune the suspension for sharper steering response or better straight-line stability at high speed etc. That said, many drivers won't notice a misaligned suspension, as long as the tyres don't seem to be wearing abnormally.

By Straight I just meant a car that has had no accident damage or a damaged subframe.
Thanks Ken
 
By Straight I just meant a car that has had no accident damage or a damaged subframe.
Thanks Ken
Understood.

I was referring mostly to the suspension going out of alignment during the course of normal use, as result of passing speed bumps, pot holes, occasional contact with the kerb etc.

I usually get the suspension geometry adjusted every two years, but it obviously depends also on the mileage. And, after replacing suspension components.

But again, many drivers don't bother with suspension alignment unless there's an obvious issue such as steering wheel pull or unequal tyre wear.
 
When I replaced all 6 of the 'linkages' of the front of my C55 I had done a little homework and was aware of the slotted bolt/elongated hole thing.
The new parts arrived and the (Lemforder) arms has the elongated hole and I had genuine MB slotted bolts.

Upon dis assembly I discovered none of that mattered as the bolts that came out did not have slots in them but the bushes had elongated holes. The bolt would only fit in the centre of the elongated hole, so thats how it went back together. With the new slotted bolts in the middle of the new bushings.

This was done on a Saturday so (reluctantly) I took the car to the local kwikfit for alignment check the next morning. I was pleasantly surprised to see that they had the latest up to date alignment kit installed. It was a quiet morning and the bloke doing the alignment work had never done a S203 C55 AMG before and was keen to do it right and searched his system properly to find the correct settings and spent time getting it right. He wanted to make a small adjustment to the rear but upon inspection we both agreed that the eccentric bolts had seen 'better days' and snapping one on a Sunday morning was not something worth risking . I had no issues with tyre wear so we let sleeping dogs lie. A rear sub frame overhaul is going to be my first big project on this almost 150K mile car..when I can get garage space.

Basically what I am saying is I got this car with close to 100K on the clock and have had no issues with uneven tyre wear and as I have never driven a 'box fresh' version of the same car to compare, I have to assume that all is well.

When I get around to the rear sub frame overhaul the car will be going to someone like W.I.M .

QUESTION for W.I.M : I believe you have threaded adjusters that you can fit to the front of C55 which enables better scope for adjustment. Did I see that you fitted them to the C55 wagon that Mercedes Enthusiast magazine used to own ?
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top Bottom