The EV fact thread

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So what I infer from this is that the car starter battery in a mild hybrid is a 48 volt Lithium ion which costs £2000 to replace. Given that there is no chance this battery will last the life of the vehicle we are trading a very minor improvement in MPG for a 20 fold increase in starter battery cost. That makes no financial sense at all for long term ownership or indeed for the older used car buyer. Who will want an old mild hybrid when there is a prospect of a £2000 bill at any time.

Seems to me this is the worst of all worlds with straight ICE or full EV being a better proposition.
 
So what I infer from this is that the car starter battery in a mild hybrid is a 48 volt Lithium ion which costs £2000 to replace. Given that there is no chance this battery will last the life of the vehicle we are trading a very minor improvement in MPG for a 20 fold increase in starter battery cost. That makes no financial sense at all for long term ownership or indeed for the older used car buyer. Who will want an old mild hybrid when there is a prospect of a £2000 bill at any time.

Seems to me this is the worst of all worlds with straight ICE or full EV being a better proposition.

I suspect that the main motivation here was emissions reduction. Manufacturers have emissions reduction targets to meet, or they are hit with substantial fines.

Keeping in mind that for every ten low-emissions cars that they manage sell, they can build another AMG :D
 
It also allows the addition of instant extra torque and thus a reduction of ICE capacity without sacrificing the most used torque band.Some large VOLVOS have very small engines now.:(
 
volvos system components
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Either you have been misquoted or you do indeed have a mild hybrid ----an MB part/chassis no may help- Is the new battery 48 volt? the 48 volt system is confined to the engine electrics the rest of the car lights interior etc will run on 12volts via a convertor. its also possible that in a bid to rationalise parts mercedes have produced a half way house sort of car using hybrid engine parts without the control circuitry for hybrid capability but that would seem sneaky/strange? who quoted you? MB or aftermarket? time for second opinion? a picture of the existing battery/s in the boot may also help??
 
In the news today:

Chinese giant BYD will avoid paying tariffs on electric cars exported to Britain after announcing plans for a massive factory in Turkey.

The company is expected to invest $1bn (£780m) in the new facility, which will have the capacity to produce up to 150,000 electric and hybrid models each year.

BYD’s move comes after the European Union imposed provisional extra tariffs of 17pc on the car maker, on top of an existing 10pc tariff for vehicles imported from outside the bloc.

Other Chinese car makers face extra duties of up to 38pc.

But BYD’s new factory will allow it to circumvent these taxes, as Turkey shares a customs union with the EU. At the same time, the UK’s trade deal with Turkey – which covers the automotive sector – means exports to Britain are also tariff-free.

 
Either you have been misquoted or you do indeed have a mild hybrid ----an MB part/chassis no may help- Is the new battery 48 volt? the 48 volt system is confined to the engine electrics the rest of the car lights interior etc will run on 12volts via a convertor. its also possible that in a bid to rationalise parts mercedes have produced a half way house sort of car using hybrid engine parts without the control circuitry for hybrid capability but that would seem sneaky/strange? who quoted you? MB or aftermarket? time for second opinion? a picture of the existing battery/s in the boot may also help??
No it really is ICE, promise. It’s an AMG GT.
 
 

Crazy, but it's a 'specialist' car where they've obviously decided that saving 25 kg or so is a high priority. Interesting that there's an option to 'code out' the Li pack (which must be a 12V one) and use a standard lead/acid instead. Otherwise it wouldn't be possible to do the swap as the charging/monitoring protocols for the two chemistries are quite different.

Quite apart from choosing a Li battery the mentioned capacity of just 60 Ah sounds very low for reliably starting a big engine in a car that's unlikely to be a daily driver. The battery in my R129 is 100 Ah .... even my W205 (which is just a 2 litre 4 cyl) has an 80 Ah.
 

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