The ultimate Mercedes purchase experience: how to lose a deal.

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Can you tell me when this was introduced? My understanding is that when you take dealer finance there is no "cooling off" period as you have visited the dealership's trade premises and made an informed decision.

Now, if a double glazing salesman visits you at your home and presents you with a finance deal which you sign you do have a "cooling off" period.

I worked for 27 years for a major finance company so things may have changed.

As I understand it, the cooling off period from a finance agreement arranged through your MB dealer is not protected by any statutory law in the UK. But I think the dealerships do not provide the full contract of the agreement which is sent on from HQ a few days later once your application has been accepted. The contract I have seen previously (over a year ago, but might well have changed now) stated that the finance contract can be cancelled within 14 days of receiving the full contract.
 
Bottom of the pile under the value for money category. :p
BMW
Mercedes
Audi
Porsche
LandRover

I would suggest that this result stems from the fact that most main dealer have changed their business model. Instead deriving the bulk of their revenue from selling cars They make a healthy amount from their servicing and spare parts. :dk:

Or possibly more to the point, these are premium brands, not intended to offer 'value for money'. If you want value for money, you probably buy a Skoda.

I don't dispute the other part of your post though, undoubtably the model has changed!
 
The icing on the cake is that the two MB dealers (Cheshire and Merseyside) belong to the same group

So the icing for the dealer is that they actually did not loose out on this. Just as supermarkets do not care whether you pay for your shopping at till number 1 or number 12.
 
So the icing for the dealer is that they actually did not loose out on this. Just as supermarkets do not care whether you pay for your shopping at till number 1 or number 12.

Not quite :)

At a supermarket, whichever till you choose, it's fine for them. Even if you walk away from one till, all the other tills still belong to the same business.

But with MB dealership... they run the risk that the next time a customer walks-off the showroom, the other 'till' (dealership) might not be one of their own chain.
 
I'm not really sure what the issue is. You want to buy a car, you know what you want, options etc. -So order online via drivethedeal (or others, I just said them as I have personal experience) and save money. They place your order with their MB dealer, who confirms your order, let's you know when it's expected to arrive and delivers your car when it's ready.

What could be easier????

cheers, Steve

Actually I had used a website similar to drivethedeal to have an idea of the best price I could get and then I showed that quote to the MB dealer in Merseyside, who (after a bit of hesitation) agreed to match that quote. That was quite easy as well ;-)
These days I buy almost everything on the internet, but cars for me are still an exception, as no online review can replace the need for a proper test drive, which takes me to the main point: the "issue", if we want to put it in that way, is that it is not normal for any business to invest time, money and resources with a potential customer and then systematically ignore him when it is the time to get rewarded for all that effort.
As for the fact that both dealerships belong to the same group, I do not think that it is the same as going to till 1 instead of till 12 in the same supermarket. If within 10 miles you have two Tescos (one very successful and the other one losing sales and customers), guess which one might be at risk of closure, restructuring, etc. ?
From a dealer's perspective, selling a car to a new customer should be the first step in building a profitable relationship and MB in Cheshire has definitely blown it, as if they were not bothered to deal with me when I was about to give them some decent cash, how can I expect them to care when I will only need a service or some spare parts in 12 months time?
 
Can you tell me when this was introduced? My understanding is that when you take dealer finance there is no "cooling off" period as you have visited the dealership's trade premises and made an informed decision.

Now, if a double glazing salesman visits you at your home and presents you with a finance deal which you sign you do have a "cooling off" period.

I worked for 27 years for a major finance company so things may have changed.

No idea on the history, sorry. But my understanding is that every financial loan contract has a 14-day right-to-withdraw clause whether it is a web-based arrangement, over the phone, or face-to-face. There is a lengthy thread on the Audi forum that includes a number of posts where people state that they have cancelled a car finance agreement during the cooling-off period.
 
What do you think??.....

Well I would have thought not, but from your comment it appeared like you found a broker who will do that, if you meant you could just ring up a dealer and arrange the test, then I thought the whole point of this thread was how the main dealer virtually completely ignored the OP......

What did you mean?
 
Well I would have thought not, but from your comment it appeared like you found a broker who will do that, if you meant you could just ring up a dealer and arrange the test, then I thought the whole point of this thread was how the main dealer virtually completely ignored the OP......

What did you mean?

I'm glad you got there in the end.
 
It is behaviour so contrary to any form of salesmanship or service that you begin to wonder if there is a system that encourages it.

A friend used to sell cars for a very prominent manufacturer (all details changed to avoid embarrassment). For a period he was the only salesman at a new branded subsidiary in their main London dealership (staff turnover was horrendous) and was set a target of selling 21 new cars and 1 used car. It was not so long after that model had been launched, it sold like hot cakes, and there weren't many used ones around. His bonus was entirely dependent on meeting that target and was very generous above that.

He, by dint of working his backside off, sold 41 new cars but no used ones as they had no used ones. When he went to see the sales manager to confirm his bonus, he was told that sadly there was no bonus as he'd failed to sell a secondhand car. Dumbstruck he asked to see the sales director who told him in no uncertain terms that he was a schmuck, he should have bought a used car to sell to meet the target, and that this was a lesson in life that targets matter.

I have to say I was staggered by this, as it is economic insanity, but he was adamant it happened - he got so annoyed he resigned on the spot, stripped off his corporate clothes and walked half naked to M&S to get a set to wear! But, it happened and gives an insight into the sort of people who populate these places to a greater or lesser extent.

As to going to Drive the Deal, am I the only one who asked them for a quote on a new car, and heard absolutely nothing?

Not excusing the OP's experience with a salesman at all but if some of the people spent a day in the salesmans shoes they'd understand a bit more why so many don't seem to give a ****; high staff turnover, demanding customers, pressuring management etc etc not to mention those complete time wasters who spend hours tyre-kicking and test driving then go away and order online.
 
As I understand it, each dealership (regardless of who actually owns that dealership) is given a 'patch' and its own sales quota and target for each month. A while back when I was trying to order a RHD mercedes from Denmark, I had to find a MB dealer off the beaten track who would take my RHD order as all the MB dealers in the major towns and cities in Denmark were not interested since they were able to sell more cars to locals than their quota permitted.

In the end I found a MB dealer a couple of hundred miles away from the port who agreed to take my order and deliver the car to me at the port on a trailer. It would appear that they were far below their quota and sales target and were unusually keen for me to order more RHD cars from them! This was the only MB dealer in Denmark that I found out of calling over twenty dealerships that would take a RHD order at that time.
 
Not excusing the OP's experience with a salesman at all but if some of the people spent a day in the salesmans shoes they'd understand a bit more why so many don't seem to give a ****; high staff turnover, demanding customers, pressuring management etc etc not to mention those complete time wasters who spend hours tyre-kicking and test driving then go away and order online.

I wouldn't have thought that there was anything unique there. We all have travails (or travaux, if you're French).

I've been to a couple of other brand dealerships recently.

My usual M.O. is to look at several marques and models that interest me, decide which I want and then look around/wait for the ideal used to appear. I always buy from main dealers.

At BMW I was looking at a specific used car and they couldn't have been more helpful.

At the first Audi dealership I was told that the model I wanted to test was out with a customer, and someone would call me tomorrow to arrange a test drive. No one did, so I struck off that dealership for any future dealings (the word 'dealership' is becoming a misnomer these days it seems).

The second Audi dealership showed only slightly more interest although the 'salesman' seemed to be more interested in resuming his post leaning on the reception desk chatting-up the receptionists. He politely declined a test drive as there was no specific car that I was interested in, and as he didn't put much effort into showing me the model (car not receptionist), though he did give me the freedom to sit in one and press some buttons, I struck him off the list too.

If I had been a salesman under those circumstances, especially with nothing else to do, I would have had at least two things going through my mind, (1) communicating with a potential customer, or tyre-kicker, would help make home-time seem to come around quicker, (2) the time spent in such a way just could be an investment for the future, i.e. if I show an interest, maybe he'll come back here when he decides what he wants. Whether or not a sale results, what has the 'salesman' lost?

I have yet to try Jaguar. My dealings with them over my ten years of Jaguar ownership was always good. That may or may not still be the case.

A lot of them are totally devoid of interpersonal skills and only want to deal with things that fall into their lap.
 
The service from Mercedes dealers is awful. Having bought three approved used cars that were all a nightmare in terms of dealers not doing what was agreed and the standard of preparation, I will buy from a non-franchised dealer next time who cares about their reputation rather than riding on the marque reputation. No point in contacting MB in Milton Keynes either - total waste of time - even when I had evidence from an independent FIMI qualified engineer they just agreed with the dealer!
 
As I understand it, the cooling off period from a finance agreement arranged through your MB dealer is not protected by any statutory law in the UK. But I think the dealerships do not provide the full contract of the agreement which is sent on from HQ a few days later once your application has been accepted. The contract I have seen previously (over a year ago, but might well have changed now) stated that the finance contract can be cancelled within 14 days of receiving the full contract.

From Which consumer rights:-

"Cooling off periodsUnder the Consumer Credit Act you have 14 days to withdraw from a credit or loan agreement. The legislation applies to all credit agreements, whether made in person, on the internet or over the phone.
Your right to withdraw from a loan agreement is extended to all agreements falling within the Directive, as well as hire purchase agreements, pawn broking agreements, and business loans below £25,000. The right to withdraw doesn't apply to loans above £60,260.
If you think the loan provider has done something wrong, you can refer your complaint to the Financial Ombudsman Service"
 
I had a similar experience with VW dealership some years back. My wife wanted to replace her Seat Ibiza and we were seriously considering a Golf or Tiguan as she liked both. However the visit to the dealership put us off. The sales man did not show much interest in selling and was in a way trying to avoid any price discussion. I assume he thought we could not afford what we were asking for... We walked out as I did feel offended by that approach and went towards my car. I turned around and then I notice the sales man watching us with a big surprise in his face when he saw us jumping in my newish at the time 911 but was too late to do anything... Actually for me was a blessing as I then changed my wife's opinion and we bought a Mercedes and then another after that. .. But for VW they lost a potential loyal customer due to an incompetent sales man

TG
 
Bizarre to hear so many story's of bad service. I bought my car from Merc in Cheshire (so probably the same dealer) over Dec/Jan and the service was immaculate. Nothing was too much to ask, they added £5k to their initial offer on the part ex value of my previous car when i told them it wasn't enough, I was expecting maybe a grand more but £5k was a pleasant surprise! They always called when they said they would and the whole experience was completely painless. Maybe it just depends which rep you get.
 
Was this at Cambridge? I've always had good service in there!

No, Peterborough. But part of the same group: Robinsons
 

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